Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. How Ethically Would Americans and Chinese Negotiate? The Effect of Intra-Cultural Versus Inter-Cultural Negotiations.Yu Yang, David De Cremer & Chao Wang - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):659-670.
    A growing body of research has started to examine how individuals from different countries may differ in their use of ethically questionable tactics during business negotiations. Whereas prior research focused on the main effect of the national culture or nationality of the negotiator, we add a new factor, which is the nationality of the counterpart. Looking at both these variables allows us to examine whether and how people may change their likelihood of using ethically questionable tactics in inter-cultural negotiations as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Effects of Implicit Negotiation Beliefs and Moral Disengagement on Negotiator Attitudes and Deceptive Behavior.Kevin Tasa & Chris M. Bell - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (1):169-183.
    In three studies, we examined the relationship between implicit negotiation beliefs, moral disengagement, and a negotiator’s ethical attitudes and behavior. Study 1 found correlations between an entity theory that negotiation skills are fixed rather than malleable, moral disengagement, and appropriateness of marginally ethical negotiation tactics. Mediation analysis supported a model in which moral disengagement facilitated the relationship between entity theory and support for unethical tactics. Study 2 provided additional support for the mediation model in a sample of MBA students, whereby (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Ethno‐Cultural Considerations in Negotiation: Pretense, Deception and Lies in the Greek Workplace.Abraham Stefanidis & Moshe Banai - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):197-217.
    A retrospect into ethos, this study examines the impact of individualism, collectivism, ethical idealism and interpersonal trust on negotiators' attitudes toward questionable negotiation tactics in Greece. A thousand survey questionnaires were administered to Greek employees, of which 327 usable responses were collected. Our findings empirically corroborated a classification of three groups of negotiation tactics, namely, pretense, deception and lies. Individualism–collectivism and ethical idealism were found to be related, and interpersonal trust was found to be unrelated, to attitudes toward questionable negotiation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethically Questionable Negotiating: The Interactive Effects of Trust, Competitiveness, and Situation Favorability on Ethical Decision Making. [REVIEW]Filipe Sobral & Gazi Islam - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):281-296.
    This study explores the direct and interactive effects of individual differences in interpersonal trust and negotiation style on ethical decision-making processes across commonly faced negotiation situations. Individual differences influence basic ideas about legitimate negotiating behaviors, affect behavioral intentions directly, and interact with the favorability of negotiating situations, resulting in direct, indirect, and interactive effects on ethical decision-making processes. Using a sample of 298 participants in executive education workshops, the study analyzes the relationship between interpersonal trust, competitiveness, moral judgment, and behavioral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Dark Side of Buyer Power: Supplier Exploitation and the Role of Ethical Climates.Martin C. Schleper, Constantin Blome & David A. Wuttke - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):97-114.
    Media increasingly accuse firms of exploiting suppliers, and these allegations often result in lurid headlines that threaten the reputations and therefore business successes of these firms. Neither has the phenomenon of supplier exploitation been investigated from a rigorous, ethical standpoint, nor have answers been provided regarding why some firms pursue exploitative approaches. By systemically contrasting economic liberalism and just prices as two divergent perspectives on supplier exploitation, we introduce a distinction of common business practice and unethical supplier exploitation. Since supplier (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Sweet Little Lies: Social Context and the Use of Deception in Negotiation.Mara Olekalns, Carol T. Kulik & Lin Chew - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):13-26.
    Social context shapes negotiators’ actions, including their willingness to act unethically. We use a simulated negotiation to test how three dimensions of social context—dyadic gender composition, negotiation strategy, and trust—interact to influence one micro-ethical decision, the use of deception. Deception in all-male dyads was relatively unaffected by trust or the other negotiator’s strategy. In mixed-sex dyads, negotiators consistently increased their use of deception when three forms of trust were low and opponents used an accommodating strategy. However, in all-female dyads, negotiators (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Maybe It’s Right, Maybe It’s Wrong: Structural and Social Determinants of Deception in Negotiation.Mara Olekalns, Christopher J. Horan & Philip L. Smith - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):89-102.
    Context shapes negotiators’ actions, including their willingness to act unethically. Focusing on negotiators use of deception, we used a simulated two-party negotiation to test how three contextual variables—regulatory focus, power, and trustworthiness—interacted to shift negotiators’ ethical thresholds. We demonstrated that these three variables interact to either inhibit or activate deception, providing support for an interactionist model of ethical decision-making. Three patterns emerged from our analyses. First, low power inhibited and high power activated deception. Second, promotion-focused negotiators favored sins of omission, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Emotional Intelligence and Deception: A Theoretical Model and Propositions.Joseph P. Gaspar, Redona Methasani & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (3):567-584.
    Deception is pervasive in negotiations and organizations, and emotions are critical to using, detecting, and responding to deception. In this article, we introduce a theoretical model to explore the interplay between emotional intelligence and deception in negotiations. In our model, we propose that emotional intelligence influences the decision to use deception, the effectiveness of deception, the ability to detect deception, and the consequences of deception. We consider the emotional intelligence of both deceivers and targets, and we consider characteristics of negotiators, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Confident and Cunning: Negotiator Self-Efficacy Promotes Deception in Negotiations.Joseph P. Gaspar & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (1):139-155.
    Self-confidence is associated with many positive outcomes, and training programs routinely seek to build participants’ self-efficacy. In this article, however, we consider whether self-confidence increases unethical behavior. In a series of studies, we explore the relationship between negotiator self-efficacy—an individual’s confidence in his or her negotiation ability—and the use of deception. We find that individuals high in negotiator self-efficacy are more likely to use deception than individuals low in negotiator self-efficacy. We also find that perceptions of the risk of deception (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Attitudes Toward Ethically Questionable Negotiation Tactics: A Two-Country Study.Moshe Banai, Abraham Stefanidis, Ana Shetach & Mehmet Ferhat Özbek - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):669-685.
    Current research has identified five discrete US negotiation tactics, a traditional one considered to be ethical, and four considered to be ethically questionable. Scholars have independently used culture to explain how the endorsement of these five negotiation tactics varies across nations. They have also independently used interpersonal trust and ethics propensity to explain antecedents of the endorsement of those five negotiation tactics. This research combines all those variables into one model that investigates the influence of horizontal and vertical individualism–collectivism, ethical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Trust, Distrust, and Trustworthiness in Argumentation: Virtues and Fallacies.Suzanne McMurphy - unknown
    What is trust? How does it function as a primary virtue for persuasive arguments? How does its presumption contribute to the effectiveness of an argument’s persuasiveness? This presentation will explore these questions and the controversy among scholars regarding how trust is generated and under what conditions it is lost. We will also discuss whether inauthentic trustworthiness is a manipulation used for gaining a fallacious advantage in argumentation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations