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  1. Laissez‐faire Social Darwinism and individualist competition in Darwin and Huxley.Richard Weikart - 1998 - The European Legacy 3 (1):17-30.
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  • New directions for scientific biography: The case of sir William dawson.Susan Sheets-Pyenson - 1990 - History of Science 28 (4):399-410.
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  • Darwin's Psychological Theorizing: Triangulating on Habit.Daniel Rochowiak - 1988 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (2):215.
  • The tree of life: introduction to an evolutionary debate. [REVIEW]Maureen A. O’Malley, William Martin & John Dupré - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):441-453.
    The ‘Tree of Life’ is intended to represent the pattern of evolutionary processes that result in bifurcating species lineages. Often justified in reference to Darwin’s discussions of trees, the Tree of Life has run up against numerous challenges especially in regard to prokaryote evolution. This special issue examines scientific, historical and philosophical aspects of debates about the Tree of Life, with the aim of turning these criticisms towards a reconstruction of prokaryote phylogeny and even some aspects of the standard evolutionary (...)
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  • Charles Darwin's theory of evolution: A review of our present understanding. [REVIEW]David R. Oldroyd - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (2):133-168.
    The paper characterizes Darwin's theory, providing a synthesis of recent historical investigations in this area. Darwin's reading of Malthus led him to appreciate the importance of population pressures, and subsequently of natural selection, with the help of the wedge metaphor. But, in itself, natural selection did not furnish an adequate account of the origin of species, for which a principle of divergence was needed. Initially, Darwin attributed this to geographical isolation, but later, following his work on barnacles which underscored the (...)
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  • Reflections on Darwin Historiography.Janet Browne - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (2):381-393.
    Much has happened in the Darwin field since the _Correspondence_ began publishing in 1985. This overview of historiography suggests that the richness of the letters generates fresh scholarly questions and that Darwin, paradoxically, is becoming progressively deconstructed as a key figure in the history of science.
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  • Erratum to: Charles Darwin’s Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and “The Gradual Birth & Death of Species”. [REVIEW]Paul D. Brinkman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363 - 399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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  • Charles Darwin’s Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and “The Gradual Birth & Death of Species”.Paul D. Brinkman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363-399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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