Switch to: References

Citations of:

Socratic Puzzles

Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 60 (2):418-418 (1997)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Freedom, self‐ownership, and libertarian philosophical Diaspora.Justin Weinberg - 1997 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 11 (3):323-344.
    In Self?Ownership, Freedom, and Equality, G.A. Cohen argues that libertarianism does not follow from respect for freedom, and that libertarianism cannot be grounded on self?ownership. Cohen's arguments are, for the most part, compelling. That leaves the libertarian philosopher the options of either moving leftwards?for example, along the lines of Philippe Van. Parijs 's Real Freedom for All?or embracing some form of consequentialism. Either way, the result is the abandonment of characteristically libertarian political philosophy.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • A robust resolution of Newcomb’s paradox.Thomas A. Weber - 2016 - Theory and Decision 81 (3):339-356.
    Newcomb’s problem is viewed as a dynamic game with an agent and a superior being as players. Depending on whether or not a risk-neutral agent’s confidence in the superior being, as measured by a subjective probability assigned to the move order, exceeds a threshold or not, one obtains the one-box outcome or the two-box outcome, respectively. The findings are extended to an agent with arbitrary increasing utility, featuring in general two thresholds. All solutions require only minimal assumptions about the being’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Respect, cognitive capacity, and profound disability.John Vorhaus - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (5):541-555.
    According to one prominent form of moral individualism, how an individual is to be treated is determined, not by considering her group membership, but by considering her own particular characteristics. On this view, so this paper argues, it is not possible to provide an account of why people with profound cognitive disabilities are owed respect. This conclusion is not new, but it has been challenged by writers who are sympathetic to the recommended emphasis. The paper aims to show that the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Membership in a kind: Nature, norms, and profound disability.John Vorhaus - 2022 - Metaphilosophy 53 (1):25-37.
    Metaphilosophy, Volume 53, Issue 1, Page 25-37, January 2022.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Relevance of Coercion: Some Preliminaries &ast.Nicos Stavropoulos - 2009 - Ratio Juris 22 (3):339-358.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Self-respect & Childhood.Nanette Ryan - forthcoming - The Journal of Ethics:1-26.
    When we raise children what we are typically aiming for is a kind of flourishing; we want childrento live well as children, and to grow to become adults who live well too. Undoubtedly, part of what we are aiming forwhen we aim for a child’s flourishing is that they meet their developmental milestones well, and that they succeedamong their peers. We are also generally interested in how a child regards themselves; we want children tobelieve that they have value, and that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Snatching Hope from the Jaws of Epistemic Defeat.Robert Pasnau - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2):257--275.
    Reflection on the history of skepticism shows that philosophers have often conjoined as a single doctrine various theses that are best kept apart. Some of these theses are incredible – literally almost impossible to accept – whereas others seem quite plausible, and even verging on the platitudinous. Mixing them together, one arrives at a view – skepticism – that is as a whole indefensible. My aim is to pull these different elements apart, and to focus on one particular strand of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • How Cognitive Neuroscience Informs a Subjectivist-Evolutionary Explanation of Business Ethics.Marc Orlitzky - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4):717-732.
    Most theory in business ethics is still steeped in rationalist and moral-realist assumptions. However, some seminal neuroscientific studies point to the primacy of moral emotions and intuition in shaping moral judgment. In line with previous interpretations, I suggest that a dual-system explanation of emotional-intuitive automaticity and deliberative reasoning is the most appropriate view. However, my interpretation of the evidence also contradicts Greene’s conclusion that nonconsequentialist decision making is primarily sentimentalist or affective at its core, while utilitarianism is largely rational-deliberative. Instead, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The demandingness of Nozick’s ‘Lockean’ proviso.Josh Milburn - 2016 - European Journal of Political Theory 15 (3):276-292.
    Interpreters of Robert Nozick’s political philosophy fall into two broad groups concerning his application of the ‘Lockean proviso’. Some read his argument in an undemanding way: individual instances of ownership which make people worse off than they would have been in a world without any ownership are unjust. Others read the argument in a demanding way: individual instances of ownership which make people worse off than they would have been in a world without that particular ownership are unjust. While I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Nozicks libertarianske ekstremisme og post-libertarianisme.Lars Johan Materstvedt - 2005 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 40 (3):201-210.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Consent, Contestability, and Unions.Lars Lindblom - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (2):189-211.
    ABSTRACT:This article provides a normative justification for unions. It discusses three arguments. The argument from consent justifies unions in some circumstances, but if the employer prefers to not bargain with unions, it may provide very little justification. The argument from contestability takes as its starting point the fact that employment contracts are incomplete contracts, where authority takes the place of complete contractual terms. This theory of contracts implies that consent to authority has been given under ignorance, and, therefore, that authority (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Epistemology of Ethical Intuitions.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (2):175-200.
    Intuitions are widely assumed to play an important evidential role in ethical inquiry. In this paper I critically discuss a recently influential claim that the epistemological credentials of ethical intuitions are undermined by their causal pedigree and functional role. I argue that this claim is exaggerated. In the course of doing so I argue that the challenge to ethical intuitions embodied in this claim should be understood not only as a narrowly epistemological challenge, but also as a substantially ethical one. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Virtues of Economic Rescue Legislation: Distributive Justice, Civil Law, and the Troubled Asset Relief Program.Henry S. Kuo - 2021 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 8 (1):305-329.
    This study constitutes an ethical analysis through the lens of distributive justice in the case of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), which was enacted in the midst of the Great Recession of 2007–2009. It begins by engaging with the visions of justice constructed by John Rawls and Robert Nozick, using their insights to locate the injustices of TARP according to their moral imaginations. However, this study argues that Rawls’ and Nozick’s theories of justice primarily envision the nature of law (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two types of debunking arguments.Peter Königs - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):383-402.
    Debunking arguments are arguments that seek to undermine a belief or doctrine by exposing its causal origins. Two prominent proponents of such arguments are the utilitarians Joshua Greene and Peter Singer. They draw on evidence from moral psychology, neuroscience, and evolutionary theory in an effort to show that there is something wrong with how deontological judgments are typically formed and with where our deontological intuitions come from. They offer debunking explanations of our emotion-driven deontological intuitions and dismiss complex deontological theories (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Coercive population policies, procreative freedom, and morality.R. Juha - 2001 - Philosophy and Geography 4 (1):67 – 77.
    I shall briefly evaluate the common claim that ethically acceptable population policies must let individuals to decide freely on the number of their children. I shall ask, first, what exactly is the relation between population policies that we find intuitively appealing, on the one hand, and population policies that maximize procreative freedom, on the other, and second, what is the relation between population policies that we tend to reject on moral grounds, on the one hand, and population policies that use (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Schauer on Coercion, Acceptance, and Schizophrenia.José Juan Moreso - 2016 - Ratio Juris 29 (2):215-222.
    This article provides a comment on The Force of Law, which is Schauer's new and illuminating contribution to the place of law in our societies and in our lives. It constitutes a strong defence of the importance of coercion in law. First, I consider cases where the law is not able to motivate human behaviour adequately, in order to show that legal coercion is not always justified. Second, I examine the Rawlsian distinction between the ideal and the nonideal theory and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mary Anne Warren and the Boundaries of the Moral Community.Timothy Furlan - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):230-246.
    In her important and well-known discussion “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion,” Mary Anne Warren regrets that “it is not possible to produce a satisfactory defense of a woman’s right to obtain an abortion without showing that the fetus is not a human being, in the morally relevant sense.” Unlike some more cautious philosophers, Warren thinks that we can definitively demonstrate that the fetus is not a person. In this paper, Warren’s argument is critically examined with a focus (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Free Will Scepticism Self-Defeating?Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (2):55-78.
    Free will sceptics deny the existence of free will, that is the command or control necessary for moral responsibility. Epicureans allege that this denial is somehow self-defeating. To interpret the Epicurean allegation charitably, we must first realise that it is propositional attitudes like beliefs and not propositions themselves which can be self-defeating. So, believing in free will scepticism might be self- defeating. The charge becomes more plausible because, as Epicurus insightfully recognised,there is a strong connection between conduct and belief—and so (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Colloquium 4: The Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Hugh Benson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):95-143.
  • Optional Stops, Foregone Conclusions, and the Value of Argument.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2004 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):317-329.
    If the point of argument is to produce conviction, an argument tor a foregone conclusion is pointless. I maintain, however, that an argument makes a variety of cognitive contributions, even when its conclusion is already believed. It exhibits warrant. It affords reasons that we can impart to others. It identifies bases tor agreement among parties who otherwise disagree. It underwrites confidence, by showing how vulnerable warrant is under changes in background assumptions. Multiple arguments for the same conclusion show how our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Autonomy, Value and the First Person.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2012 - In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press.
    This paper explores the claim that someone can reasonably consider themselves to be under a duty to respect the autonomy of a person who does not have the capacities normally associated with substantial self-governance.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations