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  1. Experimental Philosophical Bioethics and Normative Inference.Brian D. Earp, Jonathan Lewis, Vilius Dranseika & Ivar R. Hannikainen - 2021 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 42 (3-4):91-111.
    This paper explores an emerging sub-field of both empirical bioethics and experimental philosophy, which has been called “experimental philosophical bioethics” (bioxphi). As an empirical discipline, bioxphi adopts the methods of experimental moral psychology and cognitive science; it does so to make sense of the eliciting factors and underlying cognitive processes that shape people’s moral judgments, particularly about real-world matters of bioethical concern. Yet, as a normative discipline situated within the broader field of bioethics, it also aims to contribute to substantive (...)
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  • LGBT Testimony and the Limits of Trust.Maura Priest - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics (x):200-201.
    Draft of forthcoming article in the Journal of Medical Ethics where I discuss ethical tension between LGBT testimony and testimonial trust of medical professionals.
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  • Commentary On: ‘Forever Young? The Ethics of Ongoing Puberty Suppression for Non-Binary Adults’.Alessandra Lemma - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):757-758.
    Notini et al 1 offer a timely addition in the wake of a significant increase in young people identifying as transgender and gender diverse. The authors focus specifically on the case of 18-year-old Phoenix’s request for ongoing puberty suppression to affirm a non-binary gender identity. A central issue raised by Phoenix’s predicament, and that I suggest we can extend to ethical consideration of requests for other types of medical intervention by binary and non-binary TGD individuals, is whether we should ‘affirm’ (...)
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  • ‘Harm Threshold’: Capacity for Decision-Making May Be Reduced by Long-Term Pubertal Suppression.Leena Nahata & Gwendolyn P. Quinn - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):759-760.
    We applaud Notini and colleagues for highlighting the clinical and ethical complexities of a case in which a non-binary individual desires indefinite treatment with puberty blockers.1 While we agree discontinuing treatment may cause psychological distress, we believe there are potential physical and neurocognitive harms caused by prolonged treatment that have been underestimated given the limited research conducted to date. Specifically, the impact of permanent pubertal suppression on the brain and decision-making capacity should be considered. In this context, we outline the (...)
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  • Identity, Well-Being and Autonomy in Ongoing Puberty Suppression for Non-Binary Adults: A Response to the Commentaries.Lauren Notini, Brian D. Earp, Lynn Gillam, Julian Savulescu, Michelle Telfer & Ken C. Pang - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):761-762.
    We thank the commentators for their thoughtful responses to our article.1 Due to space constraints, we will confine our discussion to just three key issues. The first issue relates to the central ethical conundrum for clinicians working with young people like Phoenix: namely, how to respect, value and defer to a person’s own account of their identity and what is needed for their well-being, while staying open to the possibility that such an account may reflect a work in progress. This (...)
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  • Who is Phoenix?Roberto D'Angelo - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):753-754.
    "Some patients find it difficult to be in the present because they are stuck in the past; others, by contrast, struggle to remain connected with the past and are suspended in a so-called present that is effectively atemporal, that is out of time”.1 For psychoanalysts, the most profound and ultimately ethical way that we can help individuals, is by helping them know themselves. This involves discovering how they were shaped by their past and how their ongoing self-experience cannot be understood (...)
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