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  1. A Humanistic Narrative for Responsible Management Learning: An Ontological Perspective.Michael Pirson - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (4):775-793.
    Why has responsible management been so difficult and why is the chorus of stakeholders demanding such responsibility getting louder? We argue that management learning has been framed within the narrative of economism. As such, we argue that managers need to be aware of the paradigmatic frame of the dominant economistic narrative and learn to transcend it. We also argue that for true managerial responsibility, an alternative humanistic narrative is more fit for purpose. This humanistic narrative is based on epistemological metaphors (...)
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  • A Humanistic Perspective for Management Theory: Protecting Dignity and Promoting Well-Being.Michael Pirson - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (1):39-57.
    The notion of dignity as that which has intrinsic value has arguably been neglected in economics and management despite its societal importance and eminent relevance in other social sciences. While management theory gained parsimony, this paper argues that the inclusion of dignity in the theoretical precepts of management theory will: improve management theory in general, align it more directly with the public interest, and strengthen its connection to social welfare creation. The paper outlines the notion of dignity, discusses its historical (...)
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  • Building Institutions for the Common Good. The Practice and Purpose of Business in an Inclusive Economy.Martin Schlag & Domènec Melé - 2020 - Humanistic Management Journal 5 (1):1-6.
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  • Christian Ethics and Spirituality in Leading Business Organizations: Editorial Introduction.Domènec Melé & Joan Fontrodona - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):671-679.
    Christian ethics applied to economics and business has a long tradition. This dates back at least to the thirteenth century, with noteworthy developments in the four following centuries and again in the last century. Christian faith and reason intertwine to bring about principles, criteria, and guidelines for action and a set of virtues with relevance for economic activity. Christian spirituality, with 2000 years of history, has been embedded in Christianity from its beginning, but the application to modern business activity is (...)
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  • A Common Good Perspective on Diversity.Sandrine Frémeaux - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (2):200-228.
    ABSTRACTDrawing upon the theoretical debate on the concept of common good involving, in particular, Sison and Fontrodona, I aim to show how the common good principle can serve as the basis for a new diversity perspective. Each of the three dominant diversity approaches—equality, diversity management, and inclusion—runs the ethical risk of focusing on community or individual levels, or on particular disciplines—economic, social, or moral. This article demonstrates that the common good principle could mitigate the ethical risks inherent to each of (...)
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  • Reconsidering the Common Good in a Business Context.Thomas O’Brien - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):25 - 37.
    In our contemporary post-modern context, it has become increasingly awkward to talk about a good that is shared by all. This is particularly true in the context of mammoth multi-national corporations operating in global markets. Nevertheless, it is precisely some of these same enormous, aggrandizing forces that have given rise to recent corporate scandals. These, in turn, raise questions about ethical systems that are focused too myopically on self-interest, or the interest of specific groups, locations or cultures. The obvious traditional (...)
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