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  1. Rethinking the Relations of Nature, Culture and Agency.Patrick D. Murphy - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (4):311-320.
    Beginning with a critique of the Enlightenment human/ nature dualism, this essay argues for a new conception of human agency based on culturopoeia and an application of an ecofeminist dialogic method for analysing human- nature relationships, with the idea of volitional interdependence replacing ideas of free will and determinism. Further, it posits that we need to replace the alienational model of otherness based on a psychoanalytic model with a relational model of otherness based on an ecological model, and concludes by (...)
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  • Women and Language in Susan Griffin's Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her.Carol H. Cantrell - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):225-238.
    In Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her, Susan Griffin's embedding of language and culture within the natural world implicitly offers a critique of widespread assumptions, shared by many feminists, that language belongs only to the powerful and that it is inherently violent. Griffin's depiction of the process through which women come to speech is illuminated by V. N. VoloŇ°inov's work on the multiaccentuality of language and by Trinh Minh-ha's characterizations of oral traditions. Both authors stress the constant re-creation of (...)
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  • Ecofeminist Literary Criticism: Reading The Orange.Josephine Donovan - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):161 - 184.
    Ecofeminism, a new vein in feminist theory, critiques the ontology of domination, whereby living beings are reduced to the status of objects, which diminishes their moral significance, enabling their exploitation, abuse, and destruction. This article explores the possibility of an ecofeminist literary and cultural practice, whereby the text is not reduced to an "it" but rather recognized as a "thou," and where new modes of relationship-dialogue, conversation, and meditative attentiveness-are developed.
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  • Nonhuman Animals: A Review Essay.Marion W. Copeland - 1998 - Society and Animals 6 (1):87-100.
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