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  1. Organizing for Society: A Typology of Social Entrepreneuring Models. [REVIEW]Johanna Mair, Julie Battilana & Julian Cardenas - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):353-373.
    In this article, we use content and cluster analysis on a global sample of 200 social entrepreneurial organizations to develop a typology of social entrepreneuring models. This typology is based on four possible forms of capital that can be leveraged: social, economic, human, and political. Furthermore, our findings reveal that these four social entrepreneuring models are associated with distinct logics of justification that may explain different ways of organizing across organizations. This study contributes to understanding social entrepreneurship as a field (...)
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  • Managing Relational Conflict in Korean Social Enterprises: The Role of Participatory HRM Practices, Diversity Climate, and Perceived Social Impact.Jeong Won Lee, Long Zhang, Matt Dallas & Hyun Chin - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (1):19-35.
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  • Dignity and the Process of Social Innovation: Lessons from Social Entrepreneurship and Transformative Services for Humanistic Management.Michael Pirson, Mario Vázquez-Maguirre, Canan Corus, Erica Steckler & Andrew Wicks - 2019 - Humanistic Management Journal 4 (2):125-153.
    In this paper we advance inquiry into human dignity in relation to the theory and practice of social entrepreneurship and innovation in a two-fold manner. First, we explore how concepts from the literatures of human dignity and humanistic management can inform and enrich social entrepreneurship and innovation. Second, we examine case studies of social entrepreneurship and innovation to refine how we think about and operationalize notions of human dignity. In this way, we connect human dignity research more closely to alternative (...)
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  • Dominant Articulations in Academic Business and Society Discourse on NGO–Business Relations: A Critical Assessment. [REVIEW]Salla Laasonen, Martin Fougère & Arno Kourula - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):521-545.
    Relations between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and companies have been the subject of a sharply increasing amount of publications in recent years within academic business journals. In this article, we critically assess this fast-developing body of literature, which we treat as forming a ‘business and society discourse’ on NGO–business relations. Drawing on discourse theory, we examine 199 academic articles in 11 business and society, international business, and management journals. Focusing on the dominant articulations on the NGO–business relationship and key signifiers they (...)
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  • Hybrid Forms of Business: The Logic of Gift in the Commercial World. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Grassl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):109-123.
    Benedict XVI in Caritas in Veritate advances a positive view of businesses that are hybrids between several traditional categories. He expects that the “logic of gift” that animates civil society infuses the market and the State with relations typical for it—reciprocity, gratuitousness, and solidarity. His theological rationale offers an answer to two questions that have largely remained open in the literature—why hybridization of business occurs and why it is desirable. A rational reconstruction of hybrid enterprise that goes beyond a simple (...)
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  • A Positive Theory of Social Entrepreneurship.Filipe M. Santos - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):335-351.
    I propose a theory aimed at advancing scholarly research in social entrepreneurship. By highlighting the key trade-off between value creation and value capture and explaining when situations of simultaneous market and government failure may arise, I suggest that social entrepreneurship is the pursuit of sustainable solutions to neglected problems with positive externalities. I further discuss the situations in which problems with externalities are likely to be neglected and derive the central goal and logic of action of social entrepreneurs, in contrast (...)
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  • Achieving Shared Triple Bottom Line (TBL) Value Creation: Toward a Social Resource-Based View (SRBV) of the Firm.Wendy L. Tate & Lydia Bals - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):803-826.
    While the economic and environmental dimensions of the triple bottom line have been covered extensively by management theory and practice, the social dimension remains largely underrepresented. The resource-based view of the firm and the natural resource-based view of the firm are revisited to lay the theoretical foundation for exploring how the social dimension might be addressed. Social capabilities are then explored by looking at the social entrepreneurship literature and illustrative cases with the purpose of elaborating RBV toward a social resource-based (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice—An Introduction.Nicola M. Pless - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):317-320.
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  • Conceptualizing the International For-Profit Social Entrepreneur.R. Scott Marshall - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):183 - 198.
    This article looks at social entrepreneurs that operate for-profit and internationally, offering that international for-profit social entrepreneurs (IFPSE) are of a unique type. Initially, this article utilizes the entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, and international entrepreneurship literatures to develop a definition of the IFPSE. Next, a proposed model of the IFPSE is built utilizing the dimensions of mindset, opportunity recognition, social networks, and outcomes. Case studies of three IFPSE are then used to examine the proposed model. In the final section, findings from (...)
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  • Data Envelopment Analysis and Social Enterprises: Analysing Performance, Strategic Orientation and Mission Drift.Matthias Staessens, Pieter Jan Kerstens, Johan Bruneel & Laurens Cherchye - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (2):325-341.
    This study endorses the use of data envelopment analysis, which uses benefit-of-the-doubt weighting to evaluate the social, economic and overall performance of social enterprises. This methodology is especially useful for creating composite indicators based on multiple outputs expressed in different measurement units, and allows for enterprise-specific weighting of the different objectives. Applying this methodology on a unique longitudinal dataset of Flemish sheltered workshops suggests that social enterprises may face different types of mission drift. Further, our results show that top-performing social (...)
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  • Going It Alone Won’T Work! The Relational Imperative for Social Innovation in Social Enterprises.Wendy Phillips, Elizabeth A. Alexander & Hazel Lee - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):315-331.
    Shifts in the philosophy of the “state” and a growing emphasis on the “Big Society” have placed an increasing onus on a newly emerging organizational form, social enterprises, to deliver innovative solutions to ease societal issues. However, the question of how social enterprises manage the process of social innovation remains largely unexplored. Based on insights from both in-depth interviews and a quantitative empirical study of social enterprises, this research examines the role of stakeholder relationships in supporting the process of social (...)
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  • Visionaries and Wayfinders: Deliberate and Emergent Pathways to Vision in Social Entrepreneurship.Sandra Waddock & Erica Steckler - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):719-734.
    This study explores the pathways from the aspiration to make a difference in the world to vision and action of social entrepreneurs. Based on the qualitative analysis of interviews with 23 individuals who have pioneered institutions and initiatives around corporate responsibility, we find two predominant pathways to vision. The deliberate path starts with aspiration and moves through purpose toward a relatively intentional vision that ultimately leads to, and is subsequently informed by, action. The emergent path also begins with aspiration then (...)
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  • Linking Social Entrepreneurship and Social Change: The Mediating Role of Empowerment.Helen M. Haugh & Alka Talwar - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):643-658.
    Entrepreneurship is increasingly considered to be integral to development; however, social and cultural norms impact on the extent to which women in developing countries engage with, and accrue the benefits of, entrepreneurial activity. Using data collected from 49 members of a rural social enterprise in North India, we examine the relationships between social entrepreneurship, empowerment and social change. Innovative business processes that facilitated women’s economic activity and at the same time complied with local social and cultural norms that constrain their (...)
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  • A Fair Trade-Off? Paradoxes in the Governance of Fair-Trade Social Enterprises.Chris Mason & Bob Doherty - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):451-469.
    This paper explores how fair trade social enterprises manage paradoxes in stakeholder-oriented governance models. We use narrative accounts from board members, at governance events and board documents to report an exploratory study of paradoxes in three FTSEs which are partly farmer-owned. Having synthesized the key social enterprise governance literature and framed it alongside the broader paradox theory, we used narratives to explore how tensions are articulated, how they can be applied within an adapted paradox framework, and how governance actors seek (...)
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