Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. How Morality Becomes Demanding Cost Vs. Difficulty and Restriction.Marcel van Ackeren - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (3):315-334.
    ABSTRACTThe standard view of demandingness understands demandingness exclusively as a matter of costs to the agent. The paper discusses whether the standard view must be given up because we should think of demandingness as a matter of difficulty or restriction of options. I will argue that difficulty can indeed increase demandingness, but only insofar as it leads to further costs. As to restrictions of options, I will show that confinement can become costly and thus increase demandingness in three ways, by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • III—Ethics for Possible Futures.Tim Mulgan - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (1pt1):57-73.
    I explore the moral implications of four possible futures: a broken future where our affluent way of life is no longer available; a virtual future where human beings spend their entire lives in Nozick's experience machine; a digital future where humans have been replaced by unconscious digital beings; and a theological future where the existence of God has been proved. These futures affect our current ethical thinking in surprising ways. They raise the importance of intergenerational ethics, alter the balance between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • How Should Utilitarians Think About the Future?Tim Mulgan - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2-3):290-312.
    Utilitarians must think collectively about the future because many contemporary moral issues require collective responses to avoid possible future harms. But current rule utilitarianism does not accommodate the distant future. Drawing on my recent books Future People and Ethics for a Broken World, I defend a new utilitarianism whose central ethical question is: What moral code should we teach the next generation? This new theory honours utilitarianism’s past and provides the flexibility to adapt to the full range of credible futures (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Books Received. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (1):132-142.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Future of Philosophy.Tim Mulgan - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (3):241-253.
    In this article the editor of the Philosophical Quarterly briefly outlines the editorial process at that journal; explains why it is foolhardy to attempt to predict the future of philosophy; and, finally, attempts such a prediction. Drawing on his recent book Ethics for a Broken World, he argues that climate change, or some other disaster, may lead to a broken world where the optimistic assumptions underlying contemporary philosophy no longer apply. He argues that the possibility of a broken world has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Material Scarcity and Scalar Justice.Matthew Adams & Ross Mittiga - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (7):2237-2256.
    We defend a scalar theory of the relationship between material scarcity and justice. As scarcity increases beyond a specified threshold, we argue that deontological egalitarian constraints should be gradually relaxed and consequentialist considerations should increasingly determine distributions. We construct this theory by taking a bottom-up approach that is guided by principles of medical triage. Armed with this theory, we consider the range of conditions under which justice applies. We argue that there are compelling reasons for thinking that justice applies under (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophical Perspectives on Democracy in the 21st Century.Ann Cudd & Sally Scholz (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
    Chapter. 1. Philosophical. Perspectives. on. Democracy. in. the. Twenty-First. Century: Introduction. Ann E. Cudd and Sally J. Scholz Abstract Recent global movements, including the Arab Spring, the Occupy Movement, as well as polarizing ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Penser dans la perspective du pire : prolégomènes à une philosophie des catastrophes.Vincent Guillin - 2020 - Ithaque 2020:85-125.
    Dans ces « Prolégomènes à une philosophie des catastrophes », on avance qu'une réflexion philosophique sur ces phénomènes doit s’obliger à travailler dans une extension maximum (en abordant la question du point de vue métaphysique, ontologique, épistémologique, esthétique, éthique et politique) et en explorant toutes les ressources que nous offre la pensée comme outil cognitif (décrire, comprendre, expliquer), émotionnel (sentir et ressentir, éprouver), prédictif (prévoir, imaginer) et normatif (juger, décider). Penser les catastrophes au pluriel, c’est aussi se rendre compte qu’historiquement, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Environmental Ethics.Andrew Brennan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Environmental ethics is the discipline in philosophy that studies the moral relationship of human beings to, and also the value and moral status of, the environment and its nonhuman contents. This entry covers: (1) the challenge of environmental ethics to the anthropocentrism (i.e., humancenteredness) embedded in traditional western ethical thinking; (2) the early development of the discipline in the 1960s and 1970s; (3) the connection of deep ecology, feminist environmental ethics, and social ecology to politics; (4) the attempt to apply (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations