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  1. The UN Framework on Business and Human Rights: A Workers’ Rights Critique.Rashmi Venkatesan - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (3):635-652.
    The “Protect, Respect, Remedy” Framework along with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights is the current global standard regarding corporate conduct. This article analyses the UN Framework from the vantage point of labour rights in India by looking at the garment supply chain. It argues that it can do little to induce states and businesses to bring substantive improvements to working conditions in a largely informal economy like India. Without the state performing its duty to protect human (...)
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  • State Power: Rethinking the Role of the State in Political Corporate Social Responsibility.Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):1-14.
    Key accomplishments of political corporate social responsibility scholarship have been the identification of global governance gaps and a proposal how to tackle them. Political CSR scholarship assumes that the traditional roles of state and business have eroded, with states losing power and business gaining power in a globalized world. Consequently, the future of CSR lies in political CSR with new global governance forms which are organized by mainly non-state actors. The objective of the paper is to deepen our understanding of (...)
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  • Corporate Remediation of Human Rights Violations: A Restorative Justice Framework.Maximilian J. L. Schormair & Lara M. Gerlach - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):475-493.
    In the absence of effective judicial remediation mechanisms after business-related human rights violations, companies themselves are expected to establish remediation procedures for affected victims and communities. This is a challenge for both companies and victims since comprehensive company-based grievance mechanisms are currently missing. In this paper, we explore how companies can provide effective remediation after human rights violations. Accordingly, we critically assess two different approaches to conflict resolution, alternative dispute resolution and restorative justice, for their potential to provide dialogue-based, non-judicial (...)
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  • Corporate Governance in a Risk Society.Anselm Schneider & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-15.
    Under conditions of growing interconnectedness of the global economy, more and more stakeholders are exposed to risks and costs resulting from business activities that are neither regulated nor compensated for by means of national governance. The changing distribution of risks poses a threat to the legitimacy of business firms that normally derive their legitimacy from operating in compliance with the legal rules of democratic nation states. However, during the process of globalization, the regulatory power of nation states has been weakened (...)
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  • Beyond Guilty Verdicts: Human Rights Litigation and its Impact on Corporations’ Human Rights Policies.Judith Schrempf-Stirling & Florian Wettstein - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):545-562.
    During the last years, there has been an increasing discussion on the role of business in human rights violations and an increase in human rights litigation against companies. The result of human rights litigation has been rather disillusioning because no corporation has been found guilty and most cases have been dismissed. We argue that it may nevertheless be a useful instrument for the advancement of the business and human rights agenda. We examine the determinants of successful human rights litigation in (...)
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  • Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility: Competing or Complementary Approaches to Poverty Reduction and Socioeconomic Rights?Onyeka K. Osuji & Ugochukwu L. Obibuaku - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):329-347.
    Following the situation of poverty in the rights paradigm, this paper explores the links between the rights-based and corporate social responsibility approaches to the realization of socioeconomic rights in the broader context of an emerging recognition of CSR as private regulation of business behaviour. It examines complex theoretical and practical dimensions of responsibility and potential contributions of businesses to poverty alleviation and clarifies the apparent paradox of legal compulsion of essentially voluntary CSR activities. Rather than treat rights and CSR as (...)
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  • “Traduttore, Traditore?” Translating Human Rights into the Corporate Context.Marisa McVey, John Ferguson & François-Régis Puyou - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    This paper critically investigates the implementation of the UN guiding principles on business and human rights into the corporate setting through the concept of ‘translation’. In the decade since the creation of the UNGPs, little academic research has focussed specifically on the corporate implementation of human rights. Drawing on qualitative case studies of two multinational corporations—an oil and gas company and a bank—this paper unpacks how human rights are translated into the corporate context. In doing so, the paper focuses on (...)
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  • Torn Between Legal Claiming and Privatized Remedy: Rights Mobilization Against Gold Mining in Chile.Rajiv Maher, David Monciardini & Steffen Böhm - 2021 - Business Ethics Quarterly 31 (1):37-74.
    ABSTRACTMany academic authors, policy makers, NGOs, and corporations have focused on top-down human rights global norm-making, such as the United Nations Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights. What is often missing are contextual and substantive analyses that interrogate rights mobilization and linkages between voluntary transnational rules and domestic governance. Deploying a socio-legal approach and using a combination of longitudinal field and archival data, this article investigates how a local, indigenous community in Northern Chile mobilized their rights over a period (...)
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  • Confucian Ethics and Labor Rights.Tae Wan Kim - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):565-594.
    ABSTRACT:In this article I inquire into Confucian ethics from a non-ideal stance investigating the complex interaction between Confucian ideals and the reality of the modern workplace. I contend that even Confucian workers who regularly engage in social rites at the workplace have an internal, Confucian reason to appreciate the value of rights at the workplace. I explain, from a Confucian non-ideal perspective, why I disagree with the presumptuous idea that labor rights are necessarily incompatible with Confucian ideals and values. Specifically, (...)
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  • The Battle for Business Ethics: A Struggle Theory.Muel Kaptein - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):343-361.
    To be and to remain ethical requires struggle from organizations. Struggling is necessary due to the pressures and temptations management and employees encounter in and around organizations. As the relevance of struggle for business ethics has not yet been analyzed systematically in the scientific literature, this paper develops a theory of struggle that elaborates on the meaning and dimensions of struggle in organizations, why and when it is needed, and what its antecedents and consequences are. An important conclusion is that (...)
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  • Conflict Minerals and Supply Chain Due Diligence: An Exploratory Study of Multi-Tier Supply Chains.Hannes Hofmann, Martin C. Schleper & Constantin Blome - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):115-141.
    As recently stakeholders complain about the use of conflict minerals in consumer products that are often invisible to them in final products, firms across industries implement conflict mineral management practices. Conflict minerals are those, whose systemic exploitation and trade contribute to human right violations in the country of extraction and surrounding areas. Particularly, supply chain managers in the Western world are challenged taking reasonable steps to identify and prevent risks associated with these resources due to the globally dispersed nature of (...)
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  • Creating Shared Value Meets Human Rights: A Sense-Making Perspective in Small-Scale Firms.Elisa Giuliani, Annamaria Tuan & José Calvimontes Cano - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (3):489-505.
    How do firms make sense of creating shared value projects? In their sense-making processes, do they extend the meaning spectrum to include human rights? What are the dominant cognitive frames through which firms make sense of CSV projects, and are some frames more likely to have transformative power? We pose these questions in the context of small-scale firms in a low-to-middle income country—a context where CSV policies have been promoted extensively over the last decade in the expectation of improved economic (...)
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  • Human Rights in the Void? Due Diligence in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.Björn Fasterling & Geert Demuijnck - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):799-814.
    The ‘Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’ (Principles) that provide guidance for the implementation of the United Nations’ ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ framework (Framework) will probably succeed in making human rights matters more customary in corporate management procedures. They are likely to contribute to higher levels of accountability and awareness within corporations in respect of the negative impact of business activities on human rights. However, we identify tensions between the idea that the respect of human rights is a perfect (...)
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  • Grounding Positive Duties in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink & Luc Van Liedekerke - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):527-539.
    For years business ethics has limited the moral duties of enterprises to negative duties. Over the last decade it has been argued that positive duties also befall commercial agents, at least when confronted with large scale public problems and when governments fail. The argument that enterprises have positive duties is often grounded in the political nature of commercial life. It is argued that agents must sometimes take over governmental responsibilities. The German republican tradition argues along these lines as does Nien-Hé (...)
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  • Guest Editors’ Introduction: Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Developing Country Multinationals.Jonathan Doh, Bryan W. Husted & Xiaohua Yang - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (3):301-315.
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  • Public Regulators and CSR: The ‘Social Licence to Operate’ in Recent United Nations Instruments on Business and Human Rights and the Juridification of CSR.Karin Buhmann - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):699-714.
    The social licence to operate concept is little developed in the academic literature so far. Deployment of the term was made by the United National Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and the UN ‘Protect, Respect and Remedy’ Framework, which apply SLO as an argument for responsible business conduct, connecting to social expectations and bridging to public regulation. This UN guidance has had a significant bearing on how public regulators seek to influence business conduct beyond Human Rights to broader (...)
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  • Past Trends and Future Directions in Business Ethics and Corporate Responsibility Scholarship.Denis G. Arnold, Kenneth E. Goodpaster & Gary R. Weaver - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):v-xv.
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  • Global Justice and International Business.Denis G. Arnold - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):125-143.
    Little theoretical attention has been paid to the question of what obligations corporations and other business enterprises have to the four billion people living at the base of the global economic pyramid. This article makes several theoretical contributions to this topic. First, it is argued that corporations are properly understood as agents of global justice. Second, the legitimacy of global governance institutions and the legitimacy of corporations and other business enterprises are distinguished. Third, it is argued that a deliberative democracy (...)
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  • CSR and the Debate on Business and Human Rights: Bridging the Great Divide.Florian Wettstein - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (4):739-770.
    Human rights have not played an overwhelmingly prominent role in CSR in the past. Similarly, CSR has had relatively little influence on what is now called the “business and human rights debate.” This contribution uncovers some of the reasons for the rather peculiar disconnect between these two debates and, based on it, presents some apparent synergies and complementarities between the two. A closer integration of the two debates, as it argues, would allow for the formulation of an expansive and demanding (...)
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  • Guest Editors’ Introduction: Human Rights and Business.Wesley Cragg, Denis G. Arnold & Peter Muchlinski - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):1-7.
    We provide a brief history of the business and human rights discourse and scholarship, and an overview of the articles included in the special issue.
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