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  1. Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education.F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins-D'alessandro & Lawrence Kohlberg - 1989
  • Rationalism and a Vygotskian Alternative to Business Ethics Education.David Ohreen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 10:231-260.
    Studies have shown ethics education has not systematically improved the moral reasoning of business students and professionals and, therefore, its effectiveness should be seen as deeply questionable. Business ethics education has limited effect, in part, because it rests on rationalistic traditions within normative ethics, business theory, and cognitive psychology. Emphasis is usually placed on student’s rationally thinking about issues as a way of improving their critical analysis and reasoning skills. Yet by focusing primarily on its cognitive dimension, ethics education has (...)
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  • Investigating Cognitive Moral Reasoning: The Effect of Dilemma Context and Gender Agreement Between the Subject and the Dilemma Actor.James Weber & Dina Nasri Siniora - 2021 - Business and Society Review 126 (4):455-478.
  • Forward Looking or Looking Unaffordable? Utilising Academic Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility to Assess the Factors Influencing its Adoption by Business.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (2):159-176.
    The paper demonstrates its ‘CSR at a tipping point’ thesis by juxtaposing views of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as essential for business and societal sustainability against those that see CSR as unaffordable or irrelevant in the current economic climate. Drawing from Kohlberg's seminal theory of moral development, CSR is conceptualised as the development of organisation moral reasoning, and the proposition is illustrated by demonstrating inter-disciplinary similarities in levels of ethical concern within different approaches to the practice of marketing, human resource (...)
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  • How Can Mindfulness Enhance Moral Reasoning? An Examination Using Business School Students.Ashish Pandey, Rajesh Chandwani & Ajinkya Navare - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (1):56-71.
    Given the comprehensive influence of mindfulness on human thought and behavior, and the importance of moral reasoning in business decisions, we examine the role of mindfulness as an antecedent to moral reasoning through two studies. In Study 1, we propose and test a theoretically derived model that links mindfulness and moral reasoning, mediated by compassion and egocentric bias using a survey design. In Study 2, we examine whether mindfulness training enhances moral reasoning using an experimental design with graduate students of (...)
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  • Examining the Effects of Moral Development Level, Self-Concept, and Self-Monitoring on Consumers' Ethical Attitudes.Bahtışen Kavak, Eda Gürel, Canan Eryiğit & Öznur Özkan Tektaş - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):115 - 135.
    This study investigates the possible effects of self-concept, self-monitoring, and moral development level on dimensions of consumers' ethical attitudes. "Actively benefiting from illegal activities," "actively benefiting from deceptive practices," and "no harm/no foul 1—2" are defined by factor analysis as four dimensions of Turkish consumers' ethical attitudes. Logistic regression analysis is applied to data collected from 516 Turkish households. Results indicate that self-monitoring and moral development level predicted consumer ethics in relation to "actively benefiting from questionable practices" and "no harm/no (...)
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  • The Effects of Performance Rating, Leader–Member Exchange, Perceived Utility, and Organizational Justice on Performance Appraisal Satisfaction: Applying a Moral Judgment Perspective.Carrie Dusterhoff, J. Barton Cunningham & James N. MacGregor - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2):1-9.
    The performance appraisal process is increasingly seen as a key link between employee behaviour and an organization’s strategic objectives. Unfortunately, performance reviews often fail to change how people work, and dissatisfaction with the appraisal process has been associated with general job dissatisfaction, lower organizational commitment, and increased intentions to quit. Recent research has identified a number of factors related to reactions to performance appraisals in general and appraisal satisfaction in particular. Beyond the appraisal outcome itself, researchers have found that appraisal (...)
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  • Identifying and Assessing Managerial Value Orientations: A Cross-Generational Replication Study of Key Organizational Decision-Makers’ Values.James Weber - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):493-504.
    This research investigates managerial value orientations using the Rokeach Value Survey to assess the importance managers assign to various values. While prior work and select organizational theory posit that MVO will not change over time, the data are analyzed to determine if the MVO of mid- to upper-level managers, the key decision-makers in most organizations, has remained generally the same or has changed from one generation to another. The results show that the MVO of managers from 1990 is significantly different (...)
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  • A New Methodological Approach for Studying Moral Reasoning Among Managers in Business Settings.James Weber & Elaine McGivern - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):149-166.
    The introduction and validation of a new instrument, The Moral Reasoning Inventory, designed to measure an individuals' moral reasoning (MR) in response to two moral dilemmas within a business setting is the subject of this article. The instrument consists of two moral dilemma scenarios with eight MR statements. Two measurement scales were used for analyzing patterns of individual responses: the strength of belief in the reasons and the importance of those reasons for resolving the dilemma. Managers enrolled in a part-time (...)
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  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non–Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167 - 183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
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  • Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (Ahp) to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity.Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391 - 407.
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of “moral intensity” (Jones, Academy of Management Review 16 (2),366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) (Saaty, The Analytic Hierarchy Process , 1980) and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the field of (...)
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  • Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity.Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391-407.
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of "moral intensity", 366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the field of ethics. Following a review of the literature, we discuss the development of the model. (...)
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  • Examining the Effects of Moral Development Level, Self-Concept, and Self-Monitoring on Consumers’ Ethical Attitudes.Bahtışen Kavak, Eda Gürel, Canan Eryiğit & Öznur Özkan Tektaş - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):115-135.
    This study investigates the possible effects of self-concept, self-monitoring, and moral development level on dimensions of consumers' ethical attitudes. "Actively benefiting from illegal activities," "actively benefiting from deceptive practices," and "no harm/no foul 1—2" are defined by factor analysis as four dimensions of Turkish consumers' ethical attitudes. Logistic regression analysis is applied to data collected from 516 Turkish households. Results indicate that self-monitoring and moral development level predicted consumer ethics in relation to "actively benefiting from questionable practices" and "no harm/no (...)
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  • A Comparative Study of Ethical Perceptions of Managers and Non-Managers.Noel Y. M. Siu & Kit-Chun Joanna Lam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):167-183.
    This study provides a comparison of the ethical perceptions of managers and non-managers, including professionals, teachers, sales persons and clerks, as well as technical and plant workers. Data of working individuals were collected in Hong Kong in the form of questionnaires which contain vignettes of questionable ethical issues. Factor analysis was used to identify the major ethical dimensions which were then used as the basis of comparison. Regression analyses were used to study the effect of various variables on ethical perceptions (...)
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