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  1. The Public Ecology of Freedom of Association.Andres Moles - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (1):85-103.
    This paper defends the claim that private associations might be legitimately constrained by a requirement of reasonableness. I present a list of goods that freedom of association protect, and argue that the limits to associational freedom have to be sensitive to the nature of these goods. In defending this claim, I cast doubt on two popular liberal arguments: One is that attitudes cultivated in the private sphere are not likely to spill over into the public arena. The other is that (...)
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  • Reply to Morgan.Matthew Clayton - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (1):91-100.
    This article responds to certain objections Jeffrey Morgan raises against the theory of liberal education defended in Justice and Legitimacy in Upbringing. First, it replies to his claim that the theory is too individualistic and pays insufficient attention to considerations of ‘care’. Second, it recapitulates and clarifies the argument that the ideal of autonomy supports the conclusion that it is illegitimate for parents to enrol their children into controversial conceptions of the good life, and seeks to rebut Morgan's criticisms of (...)
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Ban the Sunset? Nonpropositional Content and Regulation of Pharmaceutical Advertising”.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):W1 - W5.
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  • Free Speech, Autonomy, and the Marketplace of Ideas.Sarah Sorial - 2010 - Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (2):167-183.
  • Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement.Sarah Sorial - 2015 - Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form rather than content leads to categorization errors. (...)
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  • No-Platforming and Higher-Order Evidence, or Anti-Anti-No-Platforming.Neil Levy - 2019 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 5 (4):487-502.
    No-platforming—the refusal to allow those who espouse views seen as inflammatory the opportunity to speak in certain forums—is very controversial. Proponents typically cite the possibility of harms to disadvantaged groups and, sometimes, epistemically paternalistic considerations. Opponents invoke the value of free speech and respect for intellectual autonomy in favor of more open speech, arguing that the harms that might arise from bad speech are best addressed by rebuttal, not silencing. In this article, I argue that there is a powerful consideration (...)
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