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  1. The Balance Between Providing Support, Prolonging Suffering, and Promoting Death: Ethical Issues Surrounding Psychological Treatment of a Terminally Ill Client.Rachel Winograd - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (1):44 - 59.
    A psychologist with a client who is terminally ill and wishes to discuss end-of-life options, specifically the option of hastening death, is faced with an ethical dilemma as to how to proceed with treatment. Specifically, he or she is bound by the American Psychological Association's (2002) potentially conflicting Principles A and E, which advise a psychologist to ?do no harm? as well as ?respect ? self-determination.? In addition, Standard 4 (Privacy and Confidentiality) mandates that a client's personal information is to (...)
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  • Attitudes to Euthanasia in Icus and Other Hospital Departments.Selma Tepehan, Erdem Özkara & M. Fatih Yavuz - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (3):319-327.
    The aim of this study was to reveal doctors' and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia in intensive care units and surgical, internal medicine and paediatric units in Turkey. A total of 205 doctors and 206 nurses working in several hospitals in Istanbul participated. Data were collected by questionnaire and analysed using SPSS v. 12.0. Significantly higher percentages of doctors (35.3%) and nurses (26.6%) working in intensive care units encountered euthanasia requests than those working in other units. Doctors and nurses caring for (...)
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  • French Laypeople's and Health Professionals' Views on the Acceptability of Terminal Sedation.Julie Mazoyer, María Teresa Muñoz Sastre, Paul Clay Sorum & Etienne Mullet - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (10):627-631.
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  • Physician-Assisted Suicide: Views of Swiss Health Care Professionals. [REVIEW]Eliane Pfister & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):283-285.
    Physician-Assisted Suicide: Views of Swiss Health Care Professionals Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9246-2 Authors Eliane Pfister, Institute of Biomedical Ethics, University of Zurich, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Nikola Biller-Andorno, Institute of Biomedical Ethics, University of Zurich, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 7 Journal Issue Volume 7, Number 3.
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  • Doctor-Cared Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Perspective From Germany. [REVIEW]Fuat S. Oduncu & Stephan Sahm - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):371-381.
    The current article deals with the ethics and practice of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and dying. The debate about PAS must take the important legal and ethical context of medical acts at the end of life into consideration, and cannot be examined independently from physicians’ duties with respect to care for the terminally ill and dying. The discussion in Germany about active euthanasia, limiting medical intervention at the end of life, patient autonomy, advanced directives, and PAS is not fundamentally different in (...)
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  • Finnish Physicians’ Attitudes Towards Active Euthanasia Have Become More Positive Over the Last 10 Years.Pekka Louhiala, Heta Enkovaara, Hannu Halila, Heikki Pälve & Jukka Vänskä - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):353-355.
  • Accessing the Ethics of Complex Health Care Practices: Would a “Domains of Ethics Analysis” Approach Help? [REVIEW]Jeffrey Kirby - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (2):133-143.
    This paper explores how using a domains of ethics analysis approach might constructively contribute to an enhanced understanding (among those without specialized ethics training) of ethically-complex health care practices through the consideration of one such sample practice, i.e., deep and continuous palliative sedation (DCPS). For this purpose, I select four sample ethics domains (from a variety of possible relevant domains) for use in the consideration of this practice, i.e., autonomous choice, motives, actions and consequences. These particular domains were choosen because (...)
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  • Reasoning About Physician-Assisted Suicide: Analysis of Comments by Physicians and the Swedish General Public.G. Helgesson, A. Lindblad, H. Thulesius & N. Lynoe - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (1):19-25.
    Two questionnaires directed to Swedish physicians and a sample of the Swedish population investigated attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide (PAS). The aim of the present work was to analyse qualitative data from these questionnaires in order to explore how respondents reason about PAS. Data were analysed in two steps. First, we categorized different kinds of responses and identified pro and con arguments. Second, we identified general conclusions from the responses. The data reflect the differences in attitudes towards PAS among the public (...)
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  • Palliative Sedation Until Death: An Approach From Kant’s Ethics of Virtue.Jeroen G. J. Hasselaar - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):387-396.
    This paper is concerned with the moral justification for palliative sedation until death. Palliative sedation involves the intentional lowering of consciousness for the relief of untreatable symptoms. The paper focuses on the moral problems surrounding the intentional lowering of consciousness until death itself, rather than possible adjacent life-shortening effects. Starting from a Kantian perspective on virtue, it is shown that continuous deep sedation until death (CDS) does not conflict with the perfect duty of moral self-preservation because CDS does not destroy (...)
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  • Attitudes Toward Assisted Death Amongst Doctors in Northern Portugal.Ferraz Gonçalves - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (2):88-97.
    Introduction Context: In Portugal assisted death was approved in February 2020 by the Parliament, although the law is not yet in force. Objectives To find out what doctors think about those practices. Methods A link to a questionnaire was sent by email three times, at intervals of one week, to the doctors registered in the Northern Section of the Portuguese Medical Association, before the Parliamentary approval. Results The questionnaire was returned by 1148 physicians. A minority of doctors would practice a (...)
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  • Attitudes Toward End-of-Life Decisions Other Than Assisted Death Amongst Doctors in Northern Portugal.José António Ferraz-Gonçalves - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092211176.
    Background Doctors often deal with end-of-life issues other than assisted death, such as incompetent patients and treatment withdrawal, including food and fluids. Methods A link to a questionnaire was sent by email three times, at one-week intervals, to the doctors registered in the Northern Section of the Portuguese Medical Association. Results The questionnaire was returned by 1148 physicians. This study shows that only a minority of Portuguese doctors were willing to administer drugs in lethal doses to cognitively incompetent patients at (...)
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  • End-Of-Life Decisions in Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Sacrality and Dignity as Factors.Rocco Salvatore Calabrò, Antonino Naro, Rosaria De Luca, Margherita Russo, Lory Caccamo, Alfredo Manuli, Bernardo Alagna, Angelo Aliquò & Placido Bramanti - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):85-102.
    The management of patients suffering from chronic disorders of consciousness inevitably raises important ethical questions about the end of life decisions. Some ethical positions claim respect of human life sacredness and the use of good medical practices require allowing DOC patients to live as long as possible, since no one can arbitrarily end either his/her or others’ life. On the other hand, some currents of thought claim respect of human life dignity, patients’ wishes, and the right of free choice entail (...)
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  • What is problematic with palliative sedation?: a review.Bernd Alt-Epping, Friedemann Nauck & Birgit Jaspers - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (3):219-231.
    ZusammenfassungDie Palliative Sedierung als therapeutische Handlungsoption in anderweitig refraktären Behandlungssituationen wird in der Öffentlichkeit und in Fachkreisen in ihrer klinischen Wertigkeit grundsätzlich akzeptiert und weitgehend positiv konnotiert. Im Widerspruch dazu fallen sowohl die Quantität der empirischen Forschung als auch die Intensität der ethischen und klinischen Diskussion ins Auge, mit der konzeptuelle als auch durchführungsbezogene Aspekte der Palliativen Sedierung beschrieben und kontrovers erörtert werden. Anstatt eines distinkten Behandlungskonzeptes stellt sich hier eher ein komplexes Spektrum verschiedener Vorgehensweisen dar. Die folgende Übersichtsarbeit fasst (...)
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