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  1. Family Firms and the Interests of Non‐Family Stakeholders: The Influence of Family Managers' Affective Commitment and Family Salience in Terms of Power.María de la Cruz Déniz-Déniz, María Katiuska Cabrera-Suárez & Josefa D. Martín-Santana - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (1):15-28.
    The goal of this research is to analyze the heterogeneity of family firms in the normative attention to their non-family stakeholders. With this aim, we suggest that the psychological process of top family managers in terms of individual affective commitment to their firms is a key variable to explain that heterogeneity. However, we also suggest a moderator effect of the family stakeholder salience in the relationship between the managers' affective commitment to the firm and the establishment of firm goals toward (...)
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  • When Do Non-Financial Goals Benefit Stakeholders? Theorizing on Care and Power in Family Firms.Melanie Richards - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Research studying the effects of non-financial goals on stakeholder relationships remains inconclusive, with scholars disagreeing on which goals increase or decrease a firm’s proactive stakeholder engagement. Instead of examining which goals act as forces for good or evil, we shift the focus of recent discussions by emphasizing the mechanisms that can explain the positive and negative stakeholder outcomes of non-financial goals under the umbrella of one theoretical lens. We do so by introducing an ethics of care perspective. Specifically, we first (...)
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  • The Vulnerability and Strength Duality in Ethnic Business: A Model of Stakeholder Salience and Social Capital.Alejandra Marin, Ronald K. Mitchell & Jae Hwan Lee - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):271-289.
    Managers in ethnic businesses are confronted with ethical dilemmas when taking action based on ethnic ties; and often as a result, they increase the already vulnerable positions of these businesses and their stakeholders. Many of these dilemmas concern the capital that is generated through variations in the use of ethnic stakeholder social ties. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a stakeholder-based model of social capital formation, mediated by various forms of ethnic ties, to explore the duality of ethnicity: (...)
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  • Sins of the Father’s Firm: Exploring Responses to Inherited Ethical Dilemmas in Family Business. [REVIEW]Reginald A. Litz & Nick Turner - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):297-315.
    How do individuals respond when they perceive that their family business has been built upon unethical business conduct? Drawing on an expanded version of Hirschman’s typology of generic responses to declining situations (Exit, Voice and Loyalty: Responses to Decline in Firms, Organizations, and States, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 1970), which includes responses of Exit, Voice, Loyalty, and Neglect, we offer a model that predicts probability of intended response behavior as a function of normative obligation (i.e., what one perceives ought (...)
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  • Profit or Legitimacy? What Drives Firms to Prioritize Social Stakeholders?Xiaoya Liang & Lihua Wang - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):57-79.
    This study questions the assumption that firms always prioritize economic stakeholders over social stakeholders. An examination of 468 Chinese private firms reveals three important conditions driving firms to prioritize social stakeholders over economic stakeholders. First, the percentage of family ownership increases the likelihood of social stakeholder priority up to a point, after which further increase in the percentage of family ownership decreases the likelihood of social stakeholder priority. Firms planning initial public offerings and smaller firms are more likely to prioritize (...)
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  • Investigating the Dynamics of Stakeholder Salience: What Happens When the Institutional Change Process Unfolds?Shahzad Khurram & Sandra Charreire Petit - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (3):485-515.
    Using data collected through semi-structured open-ended interviews and archival material, we examined the transience of stakeholders’ salience in the organisational field going through institutional change process. We found strong support for the dominant institutional logic-stakeholder salience relationship. More importantly, the results of our study reveal that changes in stakeholders’ salience are directly related to changes in stakeholders’ attributes. Moreover, we uncover mutual associations among various types of salience attributes and show that the degree of mutual association of various types of (...)
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  • Secondary Stakeholder Influence on CSR Disclosure: An Application of Stakeholder Salience Theory.Thomas Thijssens, Laury Bollen & Harold Hassink - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):873-891.
    The aim of this study is to analyse how secondary stakeholders influence managerial decision-making on Corporate Social Responsibility disclosure. Based on stakeholder salience theory, we empirically investigate whether differences in environmental disclosure among companies are systematically related to differences in the level of power, urgency and legitimacy of the environmental non-governmental organisations with which these companies are confronted. Using proprietary archival data for an international sample of 199 large companies, our results suggest that differences in environmental disclosures between companies are (...)
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  • Stakeholder Salience for Small Businesses: A Social Proximity Perspective.Merja Lähdesmäki, Marjo Siltaoja & Laura J. Spence - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (2):373-385.
    This paper advances stakeholder salience theory from the viewpoint of small businesses. It is argued that the stakeholder salience process for small businesses is influenced by their local embeddedness, captured by the idea of social proximity, and characterised by multiple relationships that the owner-manager and stakeholders share beyond the business context. It is further stated that the ethics of care is a valuable ethical lens through which to understand social proximity in small businesses. The contribution of the study conceptualises how (...)
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  • CSR and Family CEO: The Moderating Role of CEO’s Age.Olivier Meier & Guillaume Schier - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (3):595-612.
    This study examines to what extent different types of CEOs in family firms influence external and internal stakeholder-related CSP as compared to CEOs in nonfamily firms. Linking family CEO and nonfamily CEO with CSR outcomes, we provide evidence that family CEOs are positively associated with both external and internal CSR, whereas nonfamily CEOs within family firms tend to be negatively associated with both external and internal CSR. We show that the incumbent CEO’s age moderates the above relationships, indicating the existence (...)
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  • Towards the Development of an Empirical Model for Islamic Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence from the Middle East.Petya Koleva - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (4):789-813.
    Academic research suggests that variances in contextual dynamics, and more specifically religion, may lead to disparate perceptions and practices of corporate social responsibility. Driven by the increased geopolitical and economic importance of the Middle East and identified gaps in knowledge, the study aims to examine if indeed there is a divergent form of CSR exercised in the region. The study identifies unique CSR dimensions and constructs presented through an empirical framework in order to outline the practice and perception of CSR (...)
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  • Orientation Toward Key Non-family Stakeholders and Economic Performance in Family Firms: The Role of Family Identification with the Firm.Mª de la Cruz Déniz-Déniz, Mª Katiuska Cabrera-Suárez & Josefa D. Martín-Santana - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (2):329-345.
    Based on the literature on stakeholder management and family firm dynamics, this research analyses the relationship between three constructs: the identification of business families with their family firms, FFs’ orientation toward key non-family stakeholders, and the achievement of better economic performance. Data analyses from 374 family and non-family members of 173 Spanish FFs show that a high level of family identification with their firms affects the orientation of FFs toward key non-family stakeholders in setting corporate goals and that this orientation (...)
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  • How Can Responsible Family Ownership Be Sustained Across Generations? A Family Social Capital Approach.Cristina Aragón-Amonarriz, Agustín Mateo Arredondo & Cristina Iturrioz-Landart - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (1):161-185.
    Responsible family ownership is a combination of the family’s commitment to the family-firm’s stakeholders in the long term and the explicit behaviour of the family members associated with the firm. However, families are not individuals but rather a system of relationships among family members. In such a context, misunderstandings in communication, anachronistic mentalities and different value systems can block the intergenerational transmission of RFO. Consequently, the responsibility of the family towards the FF’s stakeholders may be damaged and the firm’s socially (...)
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  • Family Ownership and Corporate Misconduct in U.S. Small Firms.Shujun Ding & Zhenyu Wu - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):183-195.
    This study adds to the theory of family business management by exploring the effects of family ownership on the corporate misconduct of small firms in the United States. The empirical findings indicate that small family-owned firms are less likely to commit misconduct than small non-family-owned firms. We interpret this finding as family firms aiming to achieve the trans-generational succession of moral capital. Further investigation shows a nonlinear family-ownership–misconduct relationship. A negative relationship between them only appears in mature firms. We further (...)
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  • From Rationality to Emotionally Embedded Relations: Envy as a Signal of Power in Stakeholder Relations.Marjo Siltaoja & Merja Lähdesmäki - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):837-850.
    Although stakeholder salience theory has received a great deal of scholarly attention in the business ethics and management literature, the theory has been criticized for overemphasizing rationality in managerial perceptions. We argue that it is important to better understand what socially constructed emotions signal in business relations, and we posit the role of envy as a discursive resource used to signal and construct the asymmetrical power relations between small business owner–managers and their stakeholders. Our study is based on a qualitative (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting: A Content Analysis in Family and Non-Family Firms.Giovanna Campopiano & Alfredo De Massis - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (3):511-534.
    Family firms are ubiquitous and play a crucial role across all world economies, but how they differ in the disclosure of social and environmental actions from non-family firms has been largely overlooked in the literature. Advancing the discourse on corporate social responsibility reporting, we examine how family influence on a business organization affects CSR reporting. The arguments developed here draw on institutional theory, using a rich body of empirical evidence gathered through a content analysis of the CSR reports of 98 (...)
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  • Socioemotional Wealth and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Critical Analysis.Piotr Zientara - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):185-199.
    This theoretical paper is offered in the spirit of advancing the debate on the socioemotional wealth construct and its impact on how family firms conceptualize and practise corporate social responsibility. The study builds on Kellermanns et al.’s :1175–1182, 2012) claim that the SEW dimensions can be positively and negatively valenced as well as makes a distinction between the selective and instrumental approach to CSR and the holistic and normative one. Drawing on these considerations, it provides a theoretical underpinning in favour (...)
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  • Family Control, Socioemotional Wealth, and Governance Environment: The Case of Bribes.Shujun Ding, Baozhi Qu & Zhenyu Wu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):639-654.
    This study examines the relationship between family control and young entrepreneurial firm’s bribing behavior around the globe. Relying on over 2,000 young firms from the World Bank Environment Survey, we find that family control helps to reduce a firm’s bribery behavior, but further investigation shows that this effect only exists in countries with weaker macro-governance environment. In countries with more established and transparent governance mechanism, family control does not seem to make any difference. We interpret our findings as the business (...)
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