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The Great Fuss over "Philebus" 15b

Apeiron 25 (3):171 - 177 (1992)

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  1. Plato's Lost Lecture.Bennett Gilbert - 2012 - Dissertation, Reed College
    Plato is known to have given only one public lecture, called "On the Good." We have one highly reliable quotation from Plato himself, stating his doctrine that "the Good is one." The lecture was a set of ideas that existed as an historical event but is now lost--and it dealt with ideas of supreme importance, in brief form, by the greatest of philosophers. Any reading of the lecture is speculative. My approach is philosophical rather than historiographic. The liminal existence of (...)
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  • Pleasure, Falsity, and the Good in Plato's "Philebus".Ciriaco Medina Sayson - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    The argument in Plato's Philebus presents three successive formulations of the hedonist principle. Commentators often take Socrates' argument in the dialogue to be dealing solely with the third formulation, which states that pleasure, rather than intelligence, is closer in nature to the good. I argue that, nonetheless, in the dialogue Socrates remained concerned to provide a direct refutation of the first formulation, that is, of the straightforward claim that pleasure is the good for all living beings. ;Chapter One ascribes to (...)
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  • The Unorthodox Theory of Forms in Plato's Philebus.James Wood - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):45.
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  • Nevertheless: The Philosophical Significance of the Questions Posed at Philebus 15b.Amber Carpenter - 2009 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 12 (1):103-129.
  • The Ranking of the Goods at Philebus 66a-67b.P. M. Lang - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (2):153-169.
    At the very end of Plato's Philebus Socrates and Protarchus place the goods of a human life in a hierarchy (66a-67b). Previous interpretations of this passage have concentrated upon its relevance to the good human life, including the allowance of (true and pure) pleasures. This view picks up Plato's metaphor of a mixture of reason and pleasure, but the ranking of the goods is emphatically a vertical stratification and not a mixture in which all elements are equally fundamental. In this (...)
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