Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Attention-driven bias for threat-related stimuli in implicit memory. Preliminary results from the Posner cueing paradigm.Agata Sobków, Paweł Matusz & Jakub Traczyk - 2010 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 41 (4):163-171.
    Attention-driven bias for threat-related stimuli in implicit memory. Preliminary results from the Posner cueing paradigm An implicit memory advantage for angry faces was investigated in this experiment by means of an additional cueing task. Participants were to assess the orientation of a triangle's peak, which side of presentation was cued informatively by angry and neutral face stimuli, after which they immediately completed an unexpected "old-new" task on a set of the previously presented faces and new, distractor-faces. Surprisingly, the RTs were (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The emotional attentional blink: what we know so far.Maureen McHugo, Bunmi O. Olatunji & David H. Zald - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • When Is a Face No Longer a Face? A Problematic Dichotomy in Visual Detection Research.Vanessa LoBue - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (3):250-257.
    Countless studies have reported that individuals detect threatening/angry faces faster than happy/neutral faces. Two classic views have been used to explain this phenomenon—that negative valence drives the effect, or conversely, that low-level perceptual characteristics of the stimuli are responsible for their rapid detection. In the current review, I question whether dichotomous perspectives are the most parsimonious way to explain a large and inconsistent literature. Further, I argue that nondichotomous, multicomponent accounts for the detection of emotionally valenced stimuli might help take (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neural and Developmental Bases of the Ability to Recognize Social Signals of Emotions.Jukka M. Leppänen - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (2):179-188.
    Humans in diverse cultures develop a capacity to recognize and share others’ emotional states. In this article, studies in adult and developmental populations are reviewed and synthesized to build a framework for understanding the neural bases and development of emotion recognition. It is proposed that foundations for the development of emotion recognition are provided by an experience-expectant neural circuitry that emerges early in life, biases infants to attend to biologically salient information, and is refined and specialized through experience for processing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Preferential access to emotion under attentional blink: evidence for threshold phenomenon.Lewis O. Harvey, Zhao Fan, Jakub Traczyk & Remigiusz Szczepanowski - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (1):127-132.
    The present study provides evidence that the activation strength produced by emotional stimuli must pass a threshold level in order to be consciously perceived, contrary to the assumption of continuous quality of representation. An analysis of receiver operating characteristics for attentional blink performance was used to distinguish between two models of emotion perception by inspecting two different ROC’s shapes. Across all conditions, the results showed that performance in the attentional blink task was better described by the two-limbs ROC predicted by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark