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Autobiography and literary essays

In The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill. Liberty Fund (2006)

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  1. Benthamite Radicalism and its Scots Presbyterian Contexts.Valerie Wallace - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (1):1-25.
    This article argues that James Mill's immersion in Presbyterianism inspired an aversion to hierarchical government and a bias in favour of the Church of Scotland. These views are discernible in Bentham's Church-of-Englandism. Bentham argued for disestablishment on principle but, praising the Scottish Church as a , omitted the Kirk from his church reform manifesto. His position on disestablishment, however, and his endorsement of Presbyterianism were aligned with a voluntaryist strain of Presbyterian ecclesiological theory; Presbyterian dissenters and Benthamite Radicals began to (...)
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  • Jevons's Applications of Utilitarian Theory to Economic Policy*: Sandra J. Peart.Sandra J. Peart - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (2):281-306.
    The precise nature of W. S. Jevons's utilitarianism as a guiding rule for economic policy has yet to be investigated, and that will be the first issue treated in this paper. While J. A. Schumpeter, for instance, asserted that ‘some of the most prominent exponents of marginal utility’, were ‘convinced utilitarians’, he did not investigate the further implications for Jevons's policy analysis.
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  • The 'Sub-Rational' in Scottish Moral Science.Toni Vogel Carey - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):225-238.
    Jacob Viner introduced the term ‘sub-rational’ to characterize the faculties – human instinct, sentiment and intuition – that fall between animal instinct and full-blown reason. The Scots considered sympathy both an affective and a physiological link between mind and body, and by natural history, they traced the most foundational societal institutions – language and law, money and property – to a sub-rational origin. Their ‘social evolutionism’ anticipated Darwin's ‘dangerous idea’ that humans differ from the lower animals only in degree, not (...)
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