Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Eclipse of Value-Free Economics. The Concept of Multiple Self Versus Homo Economicus.Aleksander Ostapiuk - 2020 - Wrocław, Polska: Publishing House of Wroclaw University of Economics and Business.
    The books’ goal is to answer the question: Do the weaknesses of value-free economics imply the need for a paradigm shift? The author synthesizes criticisms from different perspectives (descriptive and methodological). Special attention is paid to choices over time, because in this area value-free economics has the most problems. In that context, the enriched concept of multiple self is proposed and investigated. However, it is not enough to present the criticisms towards value-free economics. For scientists, a bad paradigm is better (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Because You Had a Bad Day: The Role of Negative Affect and Justification in Self-Control Failure.Ally M. Heiland & Jennifer C. Veilleux - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (5):912-927.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Influence of Family Incivility on Cyberbullying Perpetration: A Moderated Mediation Model.Jing Gao, Fang Liu, Jianjun Xu, Jinyu Wang, Jiaqi Mou & Lingchao Wang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Previous research has extended the stress literature by exploring the relationship between family incivility and cyberbullying perpetration, yet relatively less attention has been paid to underlying psychological mechanisms between that relationship among university students. According to the Frustration-Aggression Theory, this study examined the relationships of family incivility, cyberbullying perpetration, negative emotions and neuroticism among Chinese university students. Data were collected from 814 university students. The results examined the mechanism through which family incivility was significantly related to cyberbullying perpetration through the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emotional Intelligence in Organizations: Bridging Research and Practice.Paulo N. Lopes - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):316-321.
    Although theory and research on emotional intelligence in the workplace has generated high expectations and promising findings, the gap between research and practice looms large. Several lines of inquiry point to the potential benefits of EI for leaders, teams, and organizations. Yet, assessing EI remains challenging, and research focusing on group and organizational levels of analysis is still scarce. In this review, I seek to bridge the gap between research and practice by considering a broader view of EI and discussing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Robust Passage Phenomenology Probably Does Not Explain Future-Bias.Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller, Christian Tarsney & Hannah Tierney - 2022 - Synthese 200 (1):1-23.
    People are ‘biased toward the future’: all else being equal, we typically prefer to have positive experiences in the future, and negative experiences in the past. Several explanations have been suggested for this pattern of preferences. Adjudicating among these explanations can, among other things, shed light on the rationality of future-bias: For instance, if our preferences are explained by unjustified beliefs or an illusory phenomenology, we might conclude that they are irrational. This paper investigates one hypothesis, according to which future-bias (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Normative Standard for Future Discounting.Craig Callender - manuscript
    Exponential discounted utility theory provides the normative standard for future discounting as it is employed throughout the social sciences. Tracing the justification for this standard through economics, philosophy and psychology, I’ll make what I believe is the best case one can for it, showing how a non-arbitrariness assumption and a dominance argument together imply that discounting ought to be exponential. Ultimately, however, I don’t find the case compelling, as I believe it is deeply flawed. Non-exponential temporal discounting is often rational–indeed, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Evolving Resolve.Walter Veit & David Spurrett - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    The broad spectrum revolution brought greater dependence on skill and knowledge, and more demanding, often social, choices. We adopt Sterelny's account of how cooperative foraging paid the costs associated with longer dependency, and transformed the problem of skill learning. Scaffolded learning can facilitate cognitive control including suppression, whereas scaffolded exchange and trade, including inter-temporal exchange, can help develop resolve.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Crítica a la naturalización del deontologismo en la teoría del proceso dual del juicio moral de Joshua Greene.Javier Gracia - 2018 - Isegoría 58:205-219.
    In this paper I propose to question the Joshua Greene’s neuroethical thesis about the essentially emotional character of so-called “deontological moral judgments”. Frist, I focus on the dual process theory of moral judgment and I criticize that they are considered only and mainly intuitive and non reflective. Se condly, I question that the “utilitarian judgment” is linked to mathematical calculation and the deontological judgment is exclusively reduced to non-reflective factor of emotion. The main objection to Greene’s naturalism raised by me (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Can Victoria's Secret Change the Future? A Subjective Time Perception Account of Sexual-Cue Effects on Impatience.B. Kyu Kim & Gal Zauberman - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):328.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Moral Reasoning: Hints and Allegations.Joseph M. Paxton & Joshua D. Greene - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):511-527.
    Recent research in moral psychology highlights the role of emotion and intuition in moral judgment. In the wake of these findings, the role and significance of moral reasoning remain uncertain. In this article, we distinguish among different kinds of moral reasoning and review evidence suggesting that at least some kinds of moral reasoning play significant roles in moral judgment, including roles in abandoning moral intuitions in the absence of justifying reasons, applying both deontological and utilitarian moral principles, and counteracting automatic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Music-Induced Emotions Influence Intertemporal Decision Making.Linshu Zhou, Yufang Yang & Shu Li - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (2):211-229.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Abusive Supervision the Last Straw? The Buffering Role of Construal Level in the Association of Abusive Supervision With Withdrawal.Riguang Gao & Bo Liu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Drawing on the theory of cognitive-affective processing system and that of construal level, we propose a moderated mediation model illustrating the relationship among abusive supervision, shame, construal level, and work withdrawal. We tested this model with a two-source time-lagged survey of 387 employees from 129 work teams in central and East China. Results revealed that abusive supervision had a positive association with the emotion of shame and supported the mediating role of shame linking abusive supervision to work withdrawal. Besides, our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Influence of Employee Emotion Fluctuation on Service Performance: An Experience Sampling Data Analysis.Biqian Zhang, Lei Zhao, Xiaoyan Liu, Yinwei Bu & Yingwei Ren - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Research on the relationship between emotions and job performance is ubiquitous, yet few scholars have examined the combined effects of different emotions. Drawing on the broaden-and-build theory and conservation of resources theory, we propose that employees’ daily emotion fluctuations will affect their service performance in opposite directions. Furthermore, we propose these effects will be moderated by psychological [i.e., regulatory emotional self-efficacy ] and physiological characteristics of the employees. Based on the experience sampling method, data obtained from 187 frontline employees of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Influence of Entrepreneurs’ Online Popularity and Interaction Behaviors on Individual Investors’ Psychological Perception: Evidence From the Peer-To-Peer Lending Market.Jiaji An, He Di & Guoliang Liu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Inappropriate social interactions of entrepreneurs can generate negative effects in the peer-to-peer lending market. To address this problem and assist peer-to-peer entrepreneurs in customizing their online interaction strategies, we used the cutting-edge cognitive-experiential self-system conceptual model and studied the relationship between peer-to-peer entrepreneurs’ interactions and financing levels. Online interactive information was categorized as emotional or cognitive, adding the moderator of entrepreneur popularity, and the effect of these interactions on individual investors was analyzed. We found that the entrepreneurs’ online interactive information (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophical Questions About the Nature of Willpower.Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (9):793–805.
    In this article, I survey four key questions about willpower: How is willpower possible? Why does willpower fail? How does willpower relate to other self-regulatory processes? and What are the connections between willpower and weakness of will? Empirical research into willpower is growing rapidly and yielding some fascinating new findings. This survey emphasizes areas in which empirical progress in understanding willpower helps to advance traditional philosophical debates.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • How is Willpower Possible? The Puzzle of Synchronic Self‐Control and the Divided Mind.Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1):41-74.
  • A New Look at Habits and the Habit-Goal Interface.Wendy Wood & David T. Neal - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (4):843-863.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  • Skepticism About Persons.John M. Doris - 2009 - Philosophical Issues 19 (1):57-91.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • Make‐or‐Break: Chasing Risky Goals or Settling for Safe Rewards?Pantelis P. Analytis, Charley M. Wu & Alexandros Gelastopoulos - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (7).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Globalizing Indigenous Psychology: An East Asian Form of Hierarchical Relationalism with Worldwide Implications.James Liu - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):82-94.
    Globalization has changed almost every facet of life for people around the world, and today the flow of influence is no longer uni-directional. It is argued that East Asian societies are anchored in an indigenous form of hierarchical relationalism where social structure is produced by relational obligations of an ethical and normative nature that have slowed its traditional culture “melting into air” as prophesied by Marx. The successfully modernization of East Asia has involved hybridization, compartmentalization, and sequencing of traditional psychological (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Updating Thought Theory: Emotion and the Non‐Paradox of Fiction.Heather V. Adair - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (4):1055-1073.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Divided Attention, Divided Self: Race and Dual-Mind Theories in the History of Experimental Psychology.C. J. Valasek - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (2):243-265.
    The duality of attention is explored by turning our focus to the political and cultural conceptions of automatic attention and deliberate attention, with the former being associated with animality and “uncivilized” behavior and the latter with intelligence and self-mastery. In this article, I trace this ongoing dualism of the mind from early race psychology in the late nineteenth century to twentieth century psychological models including those found in psychoanalysis, behaviorism, neo-behaviorism, and behavioral economics. These earlier studies explicitly or implicitly maintained (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reining In The Passions: The Role Of Emotions In Understanding Self-Control.Mara McGuire - unknown
    In this paper, I consider a philosophical model of self-control recently developed by Chandra Sripada and inspired by current dual-process models in both the sciences of the mind and philosophy. Sripada argues that the mind is bifurcated into two motivational systems that correspond to Emotion and Reason and that to exercise self-control is to act in accordance with reason when it comes into conflict with emotion. I argue that Sripada’s model rests on two false assumptions, that emotions are cognitively impenetrable (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Mismatch Problem: Why Mele's Approach to the Puzzle of Synchronic Self‐Control Does Not Succeed.Hannah Altehenger - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (2):243-266.
    Most of us have had the experience of resisting our currently strongest desire, for example, resisting the desire to eat another cookie when eating another cookie is what we most want to do. The puzzle of synchronic self‐control, however, says that this is impossible: an agent cannot ever resist her currently strongest desire. The paper argues that one prominent solution to this puzzle – the solution offered by Al Mele – faces a serious ‘mismatch problem’, which ultimately undermines its plausibility. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Morality as an Evolutionary Exaptation.Marcus Arvan - 2021 - In Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (eds.), Empirically Engaged Evolutionary Ethics. Springer - Synthese Library. pp. 89-109.
    The dominant theory of the evolution of moral cognition across a variety of fields is that moral cognition is a biological adaptation to foster social cooperation. This chapter argues, to the contrary, that moral cognition is likely an evolutionary exaptation: a form of cognition where neurobiological capacities selected for in our evolutionary history for a variety of different reasons—many unrelated to social cooperation—were put to a new, prosocial use after the fact through individual rationality, learning, and the development and transmission (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dual Process Theories in Behavioral Economics and Neuroeconomics: a Critical Review.James D. Grayot - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (1):105-136.
    Despite their popularity, dual process accounts of human reasoning and decision-making have come under intense scrutiny in recent years. Cognitive scientists and philosophers alike have come to question the theoretical foundations of the ‘standard view’ of dual process theory and have challenged the validity and relevance of evidence in support of it. Moreover, attempts to modify and refine dual process theory in light of these challenges have generated additional concerns about its applicability and refutability as a scientific theory. With these (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • States of Nature and States of Mind: A Generalized Theory of Decision-Making.Iain P. Embrey - 2020 - Theory and Decision 88 (1):5-35.
    Canonical economic agents act so as to maximize a single, representative, utility function. However, there is accumulating evidence that heterogeneity in thought processes may be an important determinant of individual behavior. This paper investigates the implications of a vector-valued generalization of the Expected Utility paradigm, which permits agents either to deliberate as per Homo economics, or to act impulsively. This generalized decision theory is applied to explain the crowding-out effect, irrational educational investment decisions, persistent social inequalities, the pervasive influence of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What Sparks Ethical Decision Making? The Interplay Between Moral Intuition and Moral Reasoning: Lessons From the Scholastic Doctrine.Lamberto Zollo, Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini & Cristiano Ciappei - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):681-700.
    Recent theories on cognitive science have stressed the significance of moral intuition as a counter to and complementary part of moral reasoning in decision making. Thus, the aim of this paper is to create an integrated framework that can account for both intuitive and reflective cognitive processes, in order to explore the antecedents of ethical decision making. To do that, we build on Scholasticism, an important medieval school of thought from which descends the main pillars of the modern Catholic social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Understanding Self-Control as a Whole Vs. Part Dynamic.Kentaro Fujita, Jessica J. Carnevale & Yaacov Trope - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (3):283-296.
    Although dual-process or divided-mind models of self-control dominate the literature, they suffer from empirical and conceptual challenges. We propose an alternative approach, suggesting that self-control can be characterized by a fragmented part versus integrated whole dynamic. Whereas responses to events derived from fragmented parts of the mind undermine self-control, responses to events derived from integrated wholes enhance self-control. We review empirical evidence from psychology and related disciplines that support this model. We, moreover, discuss the implications of this work for psychology, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Ethical Decision-Making Theory: An Integrated Approach.Mark S. Schwartz - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (4):755-776.
    Ethical decision-making descriptive theoretical models often conflict with each other and typically lack comprehensiveness. To address this deficiency, a revised EDM model is proposed that consolidates and attempts to bridge together the varying and sometimes directly conflicting propositions and perspectives that have been advanced. To do so, the paper is organized as follows. First, a review of the various theoretical models of EDM is provided. These models can generally be divided into rationalist-based ; and non-rationalist-based. Second, the proposed model, called (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • The Skill of Self-Control.Juan Pablo Bermúdez - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):6251-6273.
    Researchers often claim that self-control is a skill. It is also often stated that self-control exertions are intentional actions. However, no account has yet been proposed of the skillful agency that makes self-control exertion possible, so our understanding of self-control remains incomplete. Here I propose the skill model of self-control, which accounts for skillful agency by tackling the guidance problem: how can agents transform their abstract and coarse-grained intentions into the highly context-sensitive, fine-grained control processes required to select, revise and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Science of Self-Control.Santiago Amaya - manuscript
    In this review, I discuss recent advances in philosophical and psychological approaches to self-control. The review is divided in 4 parts, in which I discuss: a) different conceptions of self-control; b) standard methods for studying it; c) some models of how self-control is exercised; and d) the connections between self-control and other relevant psychological constructs. The review was originally commissioned by the John Templeton Foundation to provide an informative overview that would knit together different strands of current debates in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Affective and Semantic Representations of Valence: A Conceptual Framework.Oksana Itkes & Assaf Kron - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (4):283-293.
    The current article discusses the distinction between affective valence—the degree to which an affective response represents pleasure or displeasure—and semantic valence, the degree to which an object or event is considered positive or negative. To date, measures that reflect positivity and negativity are usually placed under the same conceptual umbrella, with minimal distinction between the modes of valence they reflect. Recent work suggests that what might seem to reflect a monolithic structure of valence has at least two different, confounding underlying (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Implications of Unconnected Micro, Molecular, and Molar Level Research in Psychology: The Case of Executive Functions, Self-Regulation, and External Regulation.Jesús de la Fuente, María Carmen González-Torres, Maite Aznárez-Sanado, José Manuel Martínez-Vicente, Francisco Javier Peralta-Sánchez & Manuel Mariano Vera - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • How Anticipated Emotions Guide Self-Control Judgments.Hiroki P. Kotabe, Francesca Righetti & Wilhelm Hofmann - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  • How Functionalist and Process Approaches to Behavior Can Explain Trait Covariation.Dustin Wood, Molly Hensler Gardner & P. D. Harms - 2015 - Psychological Review 122 (1):84-111.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Construal-Level Theory of Psychological Distance.Yaacov Trope & Nira Liberman - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (2):440-463.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   153 citations  
  • Looking Forward, Looking Back: Anticipation is More Evocative Than Retrospection.Leaf Van Boven & Laurence Ashworth - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (2):289-300.
  • The Psychology of Intelligence Analysis: Drivers of Prediction Accuracy in World Politics.Barbara Mellers, Eric Stone, Pavel Atanasov, Nick Rohrbaugh, S. Emlen Metz, Lyle Ungar, Michael M. Bishop, Michael Horowitz, Ed Merkle & Philip Tetlock - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 21 (1):1-14.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • An Opportunity Cost Model of Subjective Effort and Task Performance.Robert Kurzban, Angela Duckworth, Joseph W. Kable & Justus Myers - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):661-679.
    Why does performing certain tasks cause the aversive experience of mental effort and concomitant deterioration in task performance? One explanation posits a physical resource that is depleted over time. We propose an alternative explanation that centers on mental representations of the costs and benefits associated with task performance. Specifically, certain computational mechanisms, especially those associated with executive function, can be deployed for only a limited number of simultaneous tasks at any given moment. Consequently, the deployment of these computational mechanisms carries (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  • The Emotional Dog and Its Rational Tail: A Social Intuitionist Approach to Moral Judgment.Jonathan Haidt - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):814-834.
    Research on moral judgment has been dominated by rationalist models, in which moral judgment is thought to be caused by moral reasoning. The author gives 4 reasons for considering the hypothesis that moral reasoning does not cause moral judgment; rather, moral reasoning is usually a post hoc construction, generated after a judgment has been reached. The social intuitionist model is presented as an alternative to rationalist models. The model is a social model in that it deemphasizes the private reasoning done (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1355 citations  
  • The Economics of Morality.Dillon Bowen - 2016 - Journal of Practical Ethics 4 (1).
    Altruism is embedded in our biology and in our culture. We offer our bus seats to the disabled and elderly, give directions to disoriented tourists, and donate a portion of our income charity. Yet for all the good it does, there are deep problems with altruism as it is practiced today. Nearly all of us, when asked, will say that we care about practicing altruism in a way that effectively improves the lives of others. Almost none of us, when asked, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Mechanisms of Human Action: Introduction and Background.Ezequiel Morsella - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--32.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Function of Phenomenal States: Supramodular Interaction Theory.Ezequiel Morsella - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (4):1000-1021.
  • Homing in on Consciousness in the Nervous System: An Action-Based Synthesis.Ezequiel Morsella, Christine A. Godwin, Tiffany K. Jantz, Stephen C. Krieger & Adam Gazzaley - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-70.
    What is the primary function of consciousness in the nervous system? The answer to this question remains enigmatic, not so much because of a lack of relevant data, but because of the lack of a conceptual framework with which to interpret the data. To this end, we have developed Passive Frame Theory, an internally coherent framework that, from an action-based perspective, synthesizes empirically supported hypotheses from diverse fields of investigation. The theory proposes that the primary function of consciousness is well-circumscribed, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The ‘Operational’ Definition of Self-Control.Marleen Gillebaart - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Self-Control and the Self.Hannah Altehenger - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):2183-2198.
    Prima facie, it seems highly plausible to suppose that there is some kind of constitutive relationship between self-control and the self, i.e., that self-control is “control at the service of the self” or even “control by the self.” This belief is not only attractive from a pre-theoretical standpoint, but it also seems to be supported by theoretical reasons. In particular, there is a natural fit between a certain attractive approach to self-control—the so-called “divided mind approach”—and a certain well-established approach to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies.Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   109 citations  
  • Thinking in and About Time: A Dual Systems Perspective on Temporal Cognition.Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormack - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42 (e244):1-77.
    We outline a dual systems approach to temporal cognition, which distinguishes between two cognitive systems for dealing with how things unfold over time – a temporal updating system and a temporal reasoning system – of which the former is both phylogenetically and ontogenetically more primitive than the latter, and which are at work alongside each other in adult human cognition. We describe the main features of each of the two systems, the types of behavior the more primitive temporal updating system (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations