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  1. Subjectivity, Reflection and Freedom in Later Foucault.Sacha Golob - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):666-688.
    This paper proposes a new reading of the interaction between subjectivity, reflection and freedom within Foucault’s later work. I begin by introducing three approaches to subjectivity, locating these in relation both to Foucault’s texts and to the recent literature. I suggest that Foucault himself operates within what I call the ‘entanglement approach’, and, as such, he faces a potentially serious challenge, a challenge forcefully articulated by Han. Using Kant’s treatment of reflection as a point of comparison, I argue that Foucault (...)
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  • Pleasure.Cory Wimberly - 2015 - In Blackwell Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Chichester: Blackwell. pp. 2716-2720.
    The history of the political thought on pleasure is not a cloistered affair in which scholars only engage one another. In political thought, one commonly finds a critical engagement with the wider public and the ruling classes, which are both perceived to be dangerously hedonistic. The effort of many political thinkers is directed towards showing that other political ends are more worthy than pleasure: Plato battles vigorously against Calicles' pleasure seeking in the Gorgias, Augustine argues in The City of God (...)
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  • Midnight Reckonings: On a Question of Knowledge and Nursing.Christine Ceci - 2003 - Nursing Philosophy 4 (1):61–76.
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  • Sex, Race, and Biopower: A Foucauldian Genealogy.Ladelle Mcwhorter - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):38-62.
    : For many years feminists have asserted an "intersection" between sex and race. This paper, drawing heavily on the work of Michel Foucault, offers a genealogical account of the two concepts showing how they developed together and in relation to similar political forces in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Thus it attempts to give a concrete meaning to the claim that sex and race are intersecting phenomena.
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  • The Revenge of the Gay Nihilist.Ladelle McWhorter - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):115-125.
    : Bodies and Pleasures has been characterized as a confessional discourse that manages to subvert confessional practice. Here it is characterized and discussed as an askesis that works to transform confessional practice as it transforms the writer/reader. Two questions emerge through that transformation: (1) How is race (in particular, whiteness) to be lived? (2) What are the possibilities for political subjectivity in the absence of dualism and the intensification of awareness of our normalization?
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  • Foucault Goes to Weight Watchers.Cressida J. Heyes - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):126-149.
    : This article argues that commercial weight-loss organizations appropriate and debase the askeses—practices of care of the self—that Michel Foucault theorized, increasing members' capacities at the same time as they encourage participation in ever-tightening webs of power. Weight Watchers, for example, claims to promote self-knowledge, cultivate new capacities and pleasures, foster self-care in face of gendered exploitation, and encourage wisdom and flexibility. The hupomnemata of these organizations thus use asketic language to conceal their implication in normalization.
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  • “Foucault and Critical Animal Studies: Genealogies of Agricultural Power”.Chloë Taylor - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (6):539-551.
    Michel Foucault is well known as a theorist of power who provided forceful critiques of institutions of confinement such as the psychiatric asylum and the prison. Although the invention of factory farms and industrial slaughterhouses, like prisons and psychiatric hospitals, can be considered emblematic moments in a history of modernity, and although the modern farm is an institution of confinement comparable to the prison, Foucault never addressed these institutions, the politics of animal agriculture, or power relationships between humans and other (...)
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  • Habits of Transformation.Elena Cuffari - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):535-553.
    This essay argues that according to feminist existential phenomenology, feminist pragmatism, and feminist genealogy, our embodied condition is an important starting place for ethical living due to the inevitable role that habits play in our conduct. In bodies, the phenomenon of habit uniquely holds together the ambiguities of freedom and determinism, transcendence and immanence, and stability and plasticity. Seeing habit formation as a matter of self-growth and social justice gives fresh opportunity for thinking of “assuming ambiguity” as a lifelong endeavor (...)
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  • Between Embodied Subjects and Objects: Narrative Somaesthetics.Marjorie Jolles - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):301-318.
    Michel Foucault's ethics of embodiment, focusing upon care of the self, has motivated feminist scholars to pursue promising models of embodied resistance to disciplinary normalization. Cressida Heyes, in particular, has advocated that these projects adopt practices of “somaesthetics,” following a program of body consciousness developed by Richard Shusterman. In exploring Shusterman's somaesthetics proposal, I find that it does not account for the subjective challenges of resisting normalization. Based on narrative theories of subjectivity, the role narrative plays in normalization, and a (...)
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  • Bodily Disorientation and Moral Change.Ami Harbin - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):261-280.
    Neglect of the moral promise of disorientation is a persistent gap in even the most sophisticated philosophies of embodiment. In this article, I begin to correct this neglect by expanding our sense of the range and nature of disoriented experience and proposing new visions of disorientation as benefiting moral agency. Disorientations are experienced through complex interactions of corporeal, affective, and cognitive processes, and are characterized by feelings of shock, surprise, unease, and discomfort; felt disorientations almost always make us unsure of (...)
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  • Foucault and Familial Power.Chloë Taylor - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):201-218.
    This paper provides an overview of Michel Foucault's continually changing observations on familial power, as well as the feminist-Foucauldian literature on the family. It suggests that these accounts offer fragments of a genealogy of the family that undermine any all-encompassing or transhistorical account of the institution. Approaching the family genealogically, rather than seeking a single model of power that can explain it, shows that far from this institution being a quasi-natural formation or a bedrock of unassailable values, it is in (...)
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  • Queerness, Disability, and The Vagina Monologues.Kim Q. Hall - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):99-119.
    This paper questions the connection between vaginas and feminist embodiment in The Vagina Monologues and considers how the text both challenges and reinscribes systems of patriarchy, compulsory heterosexuality, and ableism. I use the Intersex Society of North America's critique as a point of departure and argue that the text offers theorists and activists in feminist, queer, and disability communities an opportunity to understand how power operates in both dominant discourses that degrade vaginas and strategies of feminist resistance that seek to (...)
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  • Foucault and the Politics of Our Selves.Amy Allen - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (4):43-59.
    Exploring the apparent tension between Foucault’s analyses of technologies of domination – the ways in which the subject is constituted by power–knowledge relations – and of technologies of the self – the ways in which individuals constitute themselves through practices of freedom – this article endeavors to makes two points: first, the interpretive claim that Foucault’s own attempts to analyse both aspects of the politics of our selves are neither contradictory nor incoherent; and, second, the constructive claim that Foucault’s analysis (...)
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  • Coming to Understand: Orgasm and the Epistemology of Ignorance.Nancy Tuana - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):194-232.
    : Lay understanding and scientific accounts of female sexuality and orgasm provide a fertile site for demonstrating the importance of including epistemologies of ignorance within feminist epistemologies. Ignorance is not a simple lack. It is often constructed, maintained, and disseminated and is linked to issues of cognitive authority, doubt, trust, silencing, and uncertainty. Studying both feminist and nonfeminist understandings of female orgasm reveals practices that suppress or erase bodies of knowledge concerning women's sexual pleasures.
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  • Anarchic Bodies: Foucault and the Feminist Question of Experience.Johanna Oksala - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):97-119.
    : The article shows that Michel Foucault's account of the sexual body is not a naïve return to a prediscursive body, nor does it amount to discourse reductionism and to the exclusion of experience, as some feminists have argued. Instead, Foucault's idea of bodies and pleasures as a possibility of the counterattack against normalizing power presupposes an experiential understanding of the body. The experiential body can become a locus of resistance because it is the possibility of an unpredictable event.
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  • Freud Beyond Foucault: Thinking Pleasure as a Site of Resistance.Robert Trumbull - 2018 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 32 (3):522-532.
    As Derrida showed in a later essay on Foucault’s relationship to psychoanalysis, Foucault displayed a marked ambivalence toward Freud, sometimes putting him on the side of the exclusion of madness and sometimes putting him on the side of those eager to listen to it. Yet, in the final stages of Foucault’s work, this ambivalence hardened into a resistance. By the time of The History of Sexuality, Volume 1, Freud is situated squarely on the side of power. It is precisely in (...)
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  • Revisiting Foucault's ‘Normative Confusions’: Surveying the Debate Since the Collège de France Lectures.Christopher R. Mayes - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):841-855.
    At once historical and philosophical, Michel Foucault used his genealogical method to expose the contingent conditions constituting the institutions, sciences and practices of the present. His analyses of the asylum, clinic, prison and sexuality revealed the historical, political and epistemological forces that make up certain types of subjects, sciences and sites of control. Although noting the originality of his work, a number of early critics questioned the normative framework of Foucault's method. Nancy Fraser argued that Foucault's genealogical method was ‘normatively (...)
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  • Reading Ladelle McWhorter's Bodies and Pleasures.Ellen K. Feder - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):98 - 105.
    Ladelle McWhorter's Bodies and Pleasures provides an unusual and important reading of Michel Foucault's later work. This response is an effort to introduce McWhorter's project and to describe the challenge it presents to engage in askesis, the transformative exercise of thinking, which McWhorter's work itself exemplifies.
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  • The Birth of an Identity: A Response to Del McWhorter's Bodies and Pleasures.Charles E. Scott - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):106 - 114.
    First, I engage Del McWhorter's confessional voice in the context of her thought and emphasize her claim that even "objective knowledge" often has an indirectly confessional aspect. Second, I give an account of the value of historicity and genealogy in McWhorter's understanding of knowing and subjectivity. Third, I address her reconfiguration of the subjectivity of desiring by prioritizing pleasure in the project of "becoming truly gay." Finally, I assess the meaning of her phrase, "straying afield from myself.".
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  • Implicit Knowledge: How It is Understood and Used in Feminist Theory.Alexis Shotwell - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):315-324.
    Feminist theorists have crafted diverse accounts of implicit knowing that exceed the purview of epistemology conventionally understood. I characterize this field as through examining thematic clusters of feminist work on implicit knowledge: phenomenological and foucauldian theories of embodiment; theories of affect and emotion; other forms of implicit knowledge. Within these areas, the umbrella concept of implicit knowledge (or understanding, depending on how it's framed) names either contingently unspoken or fundamentally nonpropositional but epistemically salient content in our experience. I make a (...)
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  • Two Kinds of Awareness: Foucault, the Will, and Freedom in Somatic Practice.Cressida J. Heyes - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (4):527-544.
    This essay identifies two kinds of awareness of one’s body that occur in a variety of literatures: awareness as psychologically or spiritually enabling or therapeutic, and awareness as undesirable self-consciousness of the body. Drawing on Foucault’s account of normalizing judgment, it argues that these two forms of awareness are impossible to separate, if that separation is into authentic versus extrinsic somatic experience. Nonetheless, awareness is an important component of embodied freedom, but a freedom understood with Spinoza and Nietzsche as grounded (...)
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  • Temporality in Queer Theory and Continental Philosophy.Shannon Winnubst - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (2):136-146.
    The connections between the fields of queer theory and continental philosophy are strange and strained: simultaneously difficult and all too easy to ferret out, there is no easy narrative for how the two fields interconnect. Both sides of the relation seem either to disavow or simply repress any relation to the other. For example, despite the impact of Foucault's History of Sexuality, Volume One on early queer theory, current work in queer of color critique challenges the politics and epistemology of (...)
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  • Revising Foucault: The History and Critique of Modernity.Colin Koopman - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (5):545-565.
    I offer a major reassessment of Foucault?s philosophico-historical account of the basic problems of modernity. I revise our understanding of Foucault by countering the influential misinterpretations proffered by his European interlocutors such as Habermas and Derrida. Central to Foucault?s account of modernity was his work on two crucial concept pairs: freedom/power and reason/madness. I argue against the view of Habermas and Derrida that Foucault understood modern power and reason as straightforwardly opposed to modern freedom and madness. I show that Foucault (...)
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  • The Violence of Curiosity.Lauren Guilmette - 2017 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 7 (1):1-22.
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  • Herculine Barbin and the Omission of Biopolitics From Judith Butler’s Gender Genealogy.Jemima Repo - 2014 - Feminist Theory 15 (1):73-88.
    This article argues that Judith Butler’s neglect of biopolitics in her reading of Michel Foucault’s work on sexuality leads her to propose a genealogy of gender ontology rather than conduct a genealogy of gender itself. Sex was not an effect of a cultural system for Foucault, but an apparatus of biopower that emerged in the eighteenth century for the administration of life. Butler, however, is interested in uncovering how something we call or identify as gender manifests itself in different times (...)
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  • Practicing Politics with Foucault and Kant: Toward a Critical Life.Dianna Taylor - 2003 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (3):259-280.
    This paper problematizes the claim that Michel Foucault's work is normatively lacking and therefore possesses only limited political relevance. While Foucault does not articulate a traditional normative framework for political activity, I argue that his work nonetheless reflects certain normative commitments to, for example, practicing freedom and improving the state of the world. I elucidate these commitments by sketching out Foucault's notion of critique as a mode of existence characterized by practices of the self, arguing that such practices possess political (...)
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  • Philosophy and the Apparatus of Disability.Shelley Tremain - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Abstract and Keywords Mainstream philosophers take for granted that disability is a prediscursive, transcultural, and transhistorical disadvantage, an objective human defect or characteristic that ought to be prevented, corrected, eliminated, or cured. That these assumptions are contestable, that it might be the case that disability is a historically and culturally specific, contingent social phenomenon, a complex apparatus of power, rather than a natural attribute or property that certain people possess, is not considered, let alone seriously entertained. This chapter draws on (...)
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  • Sex, Race, and Biopower: A Foucauldian Genealogy.Ladelle Mcwhorter - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):38-62.
    For many years feminists have asserted an "intersection" between sex and race. This paper, drawing heavily on the work of Michel Foucault, offers a genealogical account of the two concepts showing how they developed together and in relation to similar political forces in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Thus it attempts to give a concrete meaning to the claim that sex and race are intersecting phenomena.
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  • Coming to Understand: Orgasm and the Epistemology of Ignorance.Nancy Tuana - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):194-232.
    Lay understanding and scientific accounts of female sexuality and orgasm provide a fertile site for demonstrating the importance of including epistemologies of ignorance within feminist epistemologies. Ignorance is not a simple lack. It is often constructed, maintained, and disseminated and is linked to issues of cognitive authority, doubt, trust, silencing, and uncertainty. Studying both feminist and nonfeminist understandings of female orgasm reveals practices that suppress or erase bodies of knowledge concerning women's sexual pleasures.
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  • Anarchic Bodies: Foucault and the Feminist Question of Experience.Johanna Oksala - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):99-121.
    The article shows that Michel Foucault's account of the sexual body is not a naive return to a prediscursive body, nor does it amount to discourse reductionism and to the exclusion of experience, as some feminists have argued. Instead, Foucault's idea of bodies and pleasures as a possibility of the counterattack against normalizing power presupposes an experiential understanding of the body. The experiential body can become a locus of resistance because it is the possibility of an unpredictable event.
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  • Foucault Goes to Weight Watchers.Cressida J. Heyes - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):126-149.
    This article argues that commercial weight-loss organizations appropriate and debase the askeses—practices of care of the self—that Michel Foucault theorized, increasing members’ capacities at the same time as they encourage participation in ever-tightening webs of power. Weight Watchers, for example, claims to promote self-knowledge, cultivate new capacities and pleasures, foster self-care in face of gendered exploitation, and encourage wisdom and flexibility. The hupomnemata of these organizations thus use asketic language to conceal their implication in normalization.
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  • The Revenge of the Gay Nihilist.Ladelle McWhorter - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):115-125.
    Bodies and Pleasures has been characterized as a confessional discourse that manages to subvert confessional practice. Here it is characterized and discussed as an askesis that works to transform confessional practice as it transforms the writer/reader. Two questions emerge through that transformation: How is race to be lived? What are the possibilities for political subjectivity in the absence of dualism and the intensification of awareness of our normalization?
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  • Louise Bourgeois’ Technologies of the Self.Katrina Mitcheson - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 2 (1):31-49.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, I demonstrate how Louise Bourgeois used her artworks not only to better understand herself but also to cultivate a self capable of taking control of and reshaping the material of her past. Exploring her artworks in the context of Michel Foucault's understanding of technologies of the self, I both contribute to the appreciation of Bourgeois’ work and show how visual artworks can be used to understand, cultivate, and transform aspects of the self. Foucault's understanding of our subjectivity, (...)
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  • Gender, Power, Nursing: A Case Analysis.Christine Ceci - 2004 - Nursing Inquiry 11 (2):72-81.
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  • Bearing the Lightning of Possible Storms: Foucault’s Experimental Social Criticism. [REVIEW]Zach VanderVeen - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):467-484.
    This paper argues that Michel Foucault explicitly rejected the model of critique by which he is often understood—by both his defenders and detractors. Rather than justifying norms that could be said to represent “the people;” judging institutions, norms, and practices accordingly; and creating programs for others to enact, he theorized and practiced an experimental social criticism in which specific intellectuals help people work through “intolerable” situations by multiplying the ways they can think about and act upon them. As Foucault’s work (...)
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  • Philosophical Parrhesia as Aesthetics of Existence.Jakub Franěk - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (2):113-134.
    According to some interpreters, Foucault's encounter with the Greek and Roman ethics led him to reconsider his earlier work and to turn away from politics. Drawing mostly from Foucault's last and hitherto unpublished lecture course, this paper argues that Foucault's turn to ethics should not be interpreted as a turn away from his previous work, but rather as its logical continuation and an attempt to resolve some of the outstanding questions. I argue that the 1984 lectures on parrhesia should be (...)
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  • Health Promotion, Governmentality and the Challenges of Theorizing Pleasure and Desire.Kaspar Villadsen & Mads Peter Karlsen - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (3):3-30.
    The relationship between pleasure and asceticism has been at the core of debates on western subjectivity at least since Nietzsche. Addressing this theme, this article explores the emergence of ‘non-authoritarian’ health campaigns, which do not propagate abstention from harmful substances but intend to foster a ‘well-balanced subject’ straddling pleasure and asceticism. The article seeks to develop the Foucauldian analytical framework by foregrounding a strategy of subjectivation that integrates desire, pleasure and enjoyment into health promotion. The point of departure is the (...)
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  • Continental Feminism.Ann J. Cahill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Visualizing Resistance: Foucauldian Ethics and the Female Body Builder.Megan A. Dean - 2011 - PhaenEx 6 (1):64-89.
    Drawing on the relation between disciplinary power and aesthetics, Honi Fern Haber argues that the muscled woman’s “revolting” body undermines patriarchy and empowers women. Consequently, female bodybuilding can be a Foucauldian and feminist practice of resistance. I will argue that Haber’s insistence on the visibility of embodied resistance is flawed. By positing a static goal and failing to sufficiently consider non-visible aspects of normalization, namely pleasure and pain, Haber risks reinscribing the muscled woman into yet another normalizing scheme. In the (...)
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  • Ellen K. Feder's Family Bonds: Genealogies of Race and Gender.Chloë Taylor - 2010 - PhaenEx 5 (1):118-128.
  • Cosmetic Surgery and the Televisual Makeover: A Foucauldian Feminist Reading.Cressida J. Heyes - 2007 - Feminist Media Studies 7 (1):17-32.
    I argue that the televisual cosmetic surgical makeover is usefully understood as a contemporary manifestation of normalization, in Foucault’s sense—a process of defining a population in relation to its conformity or deviance from a norm, while simultaneously generating narratives of individual authenticity. Drawing on detailed analysis of “Extreme Makeover,” I suggest that the show erases its complicity with creating homogeneous bodies by representing cosmetic surgery as enabling of personal transformation through its narratives of intrinsic motivation and authentic becoming, and its (...)
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  • Power, Freedom, and Individuality: Foucault and Sexual Difference.Miri Rozmarin - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (1):1-14.
    This paper offers a detailed account of Foucaults ethical and political notion of individuality as presented in his late work, and discusses its relationship to the feminist project of the theory of sexual difference. I argue that Foucaults elaboration of the classical ethos of care for the self opens the way for regarding the I-woman as an ethical, political and aesthetic self-creation. However, it has significant limitations that cannot be ignored. I elaborate on two aspects of Foucaults avoidance of sexual (...)
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  • Intersections Between Pragmatist and Continental Feminism.Shannon Sullivan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Michel Foucault.Gary Gutting - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Feminist Perspectives on Power.Amy Allen - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Continental Feminism.Jennifer Hansen - 2013 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.