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  1. ‘Playing sport playfully’: on the playful attitude in sport.Emily Ryall & Lukáš Mareš - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):293-306.
    ABSTRACT There has been extensive debate among various disciplines about the nature and value of play. From these discussions it seems clear that play is a phenomenon with more than just one dimension: as a specific type of activity, as a form or structure, as an ontologically distinctive phenomenon, as a type of experience, or as a stance or an attitude towards a particular activity. This article focuses on the importance of the playful attitude in sport. It begins by attempting (...)
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  • Kinds of Fair Play and Regulation Enforcement: Toward a Better Sports Ethic.Ioan-Radu Motoarca - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (1):121-136.
    It is customary for institutions that organize sporting competitions and events to exercise a considerable degree of authority over the participants. That authority is often manifested in the enforcement of penalties for infringements of fair play. This paper focuses on one concrete case from soccer, although I take the discussion to extend to other sports as well. I argue that not all fair play rules should be enforced by the respective organizing institutions, and that enforcing all of them indiscriminately is (...)
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  • Officiating in Aesthetic Sports.Graham McFee - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):1-17.
    In 1974, David Best rightly contrasted purposive sports (exemplified by most sports) with aesthetic sports; and recently I was careful to exempt the issues for aesthetic sports from my critique of the prospects for an all-embracing philosophy of officiating. While discretion plays a part in umpiring or refereeing in both kinds of sports, it is especially important for aesthetic sports (such as gymnastic vaulting, ice-skating or diving), where the manner of execution determines victory. Here, it is urged that the issue (...)
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  • Fairness, Epistemology, and Rules: A Prolegomenon to a Philosophy of Officiating?Graham McFee - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):229-253.
  • Competition, Redemption, and Hope.Scott Kretchmar - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):101-116.
    Zero-sum aspects of sport have generated a number of ethical concerns and a similar number of defenses or apologetics. The trick has been to find a middle position that neither overly gentrifies sport nor inappropriately emphasizes the significance of winning and losing. One such position would have us focus on the process of trying to win over the fact of having one. It would also ameliorate any harms associated with defeat by pointing out that benefits like achievement, excellence, and moral (...)
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  • Should chess and other mind sports be regarded as sports?Filip Kobiela - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (3):279-295.
    ABSTRACTIn the philosophy of sport, an opinion that chess is in fact not sports because it lacks physical skills is a standard position. I call the argument that leads to this conclusion a mind sport syllogism. Its analysis enables me to explicate four possible positions concerning the sport-status of chess. Apart from the standard position, which excludes chess from the sport family, I also present analysis of other possible positions, which – for various reasons – do not deny that chess (...)
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  • Doping in Cycling: Realism, Antirealism and Ethical Deliberation.Carwyn Jones - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (1):88-101.
  • The Moral Ambiguity of the Makeup Call.Mark Hamilton - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):212-228.
    If one sits in the stands for awhile at a local sporting contest, whether it is wrestling, soccer, baseball or particularly basketball, before long someone will exclaim toward a referee, ?That was a makeup call. You owe us one.? Everyone knows what this means but if an eight-year old beside you hears this screamed for the first time and asks, ?What does that mean?? An explanation given to her will be something like ?that's when an official makes a call and (...)
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  • Why Jim Joyce Wasn’t Wrong: Baseball and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Amber L. Griffioen - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (3):327-348.
    In 2010, pitcher Armando Galarraga was denied a perfect game when umpire Jim Joyce called Jason Donald safe at first with two outs in the bottom of the 9th. In the numerous media discussions that followed, Joyce’s ‘blown’ call was commonly referred to as ‘mistaken’, ‘wrong’, or otherwise erroneous. However, this use of language makes some not uncontroversial ontological assumptions. It claims that the fact that a runner is safe or out has nothing to do with the ruling of the (...)
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  • Pursuing MeaningBy Emma Borg.N. Fotion - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):580-582.
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  • Sportworld.Andrew Edgar - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):30 - 54.
    (2013). Sportworld. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 30-54. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761881.
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  • The paradox of bad faith and elite competitive sport.Leon Culbertson - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):65-86.
  • Rules and Obligations.Bogdan Ciomaga - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):19-40.
    The existence of the obligation to follow rules in sport is widely accepted, but there are only a few studies that provide accounts that justify it. Building upon Wolff's challenge to traditional political theories, this study proposes a theory that limits the level of normativity to which participants in sport contests are bound in an effort to maximize their autonomy. Instead of constructing a unitary theory of obligations to follow sport rules, a pluralistic account is offered, one that allows for (...)
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  • Categorical Shortcomings: Application, Adjudication, and Contextual Descriptions of Game Rules.Chad Carlson & John Gleaves - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):197-211.
  • Truth by Analysis: Games, Names, and Philosophy By Colin McGinn. [REVIEW]Tim Button - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):577-580.
    In Truth by Analysis (2012), Colin McGinn aims to breathe new life into conceptual analysis. Sadly, he fails to defend conceptual analysis, either in principle or by example.
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  • Fra egoisme til sjenerøsitet – kan toppidretten reformeres?Gunnar Breivik - 2010 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):39-56.
    Artikkelen tar utgangspunkt i den norske idrettsmodellen der topp og bredde hører sammen, og der toppidrettsutøvere uvegerlig blir rollemodeller for barn og unge. Den moderne toppidretten er i økende grad preget av egoistiske holdninger der det dreier seg hele tiden om å skaffe seg fordeler. I denne artikkelen tar jeg opp egoisme, rettferdighet og sjenerøsitet som tre grunnleggende holdninger i idrettskonkurranser og drøfter hvorvidt man med inspirasjon fra sjenerøsitetsidealer og praktiske eksempler kan tenke seg en toppidrett som i større grad (...)
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  • An Agon Aesthetics of Football.Steffen Borge - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):97-123.
    In this article, I first address the ethical considerations about football and show that a meritocratic-fairness view of sports fails to capture the phenomenon of football. Fairness of result is not at centre stage in football. Football is about the drama, about the tension and the emotions it provokes. This moves us to the realm of aesthetics. I reject the idea of the aesthetics of football as the disinterested aesthetic appreciation, which traditionally has been deemed central to aesthetics. Instead, I (...)
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  • Sporting supererogation and why it matters.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):359-373.
    A commonly accepted feature of commonsense morality is that there are some acts that are supererogatory or beyond the call of duty. Recently, philosophers have begun to ask whether something like supererogation might exist in other normative domains such as epistemology and esthetics. In this paper, I will argue that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. I will then argue that recognizing the existence of sporting supererogation is important because it highlights the value of sport as (...)
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  • Rational Argument in Moral Philosophy: Some Implications of Gordon Baker's Therapeutic Conception of Philosophy.Christopher Lawton - unknown
    This work is an investigation into philosophical method and rational argument in moral philosophy. It makes an original contribution to human understanding, by taking some of the tools and techniques that Gordon Baker identifies in the later work of Wittgenstein, and using them as a way of fending for oneself in an area of philosophy that neither Baker, nor Wittgenstein, wrote on. More specifically, a discussion of some different aspects of the contemporary literature on Dancy’s moral particularism is used as (...)
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  • Lexism: Beyond the Social Model of Dyslexia.Craig Collinson - 2017 - Dissertation, Edge Hill University
    In this thesis a new concept called ‘Lexism’ is proposed, outlined and defended. The dyslexia debate is currently in a state of deadlock. The origin of this stalemate is not an empirical problem but a conceptual one. The conceptual problems with dyslexia, and the existence of dyslexics, are both recognised, but the contradictions between them remain unresolved. For this reason a philosophical approach has been adopted. First, the conceptual foundations are set out to enable the recognition of Lexism as a (...)
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