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  1. Ethical uncertainty and COVID-19: exploring the lived experiences of senior physicians at a major medical centre.Ruaim Muaygil, Raniah Aldekhyyel, Lemmese AlWatban, Lyan Almana, Rana F. Almana & Mazin Barry - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Given the wide-reaching and detrimental impact of COVID-19, its strain on healthcare resources, and the urgent need for—sometimes forced—public health interventions, thorough examination of the ethical issues brought to light by the pandemic is especially warranted. This paper aims to identify some of the complex moral dilemmas faced by senior physicians at a major medical centre in Saudi Arabia, in an effort to gain a better understanding of how they navigated ethical uncertainty during a time of crisis. This qualitative study (...)
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  • Nursing violent patients: Vulnerability and the limits of the duty to provide care.Jennifer Dunsford - 2022 - Nursing Inquiry 29 (2):e12453.
    The duty to provide care is foundational to the nursing profession and the work of nurses. Unfortunately, violence against nurses at the hands of recipients of care is increasingly common. While employers, labor unions, and professional associations decry the phenomenon, the decision to withdraw care, even from someone who is violent or abusive, is never easy. The scant guidance that exists suggests that the duty to care continues until the risk of harm to the nurse is unreasonable, however, “reasonableness” remains (...)
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  • Triage, consent and trusting black boxes.Kenneth Boyd - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):289-290.
    The coronavirus pandemic has brought to public attention a variety of questions long debated in medical ethics, but now given both added urgency and wider publicity. Among these is triage, with its origins in deciding which individual lives are to be saved on a battlefield, but now also concerned with the allocation of scarce resources more generally. On the historical battlefield, decisions about whom to treat first – neither those who would survive without treatment, nor those who would not survive (...)
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