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  1. Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment of Service Robots: The Psychological/Work Science Perspective.Martin Fischer - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):231-248.
    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man–robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work tasks to be performed (...)
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  • Causes and Consequences of Mind Perception.Adam Waytz, Kurt Gray, Nicholas Epley & Daniel M. Wegner - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):383-388.
    Perceiving others? minds is a crucial component of social life. People do not, however, always ascribe minds to other people, and sometimes ascribe minds to non-people. This article reviews when mind perception occurs, when it does not, and why mind perception is important. Causes of mind perception stem both from the perceiver and perceived, and include the need for social connection and a similarity to oneself. Mind perception also has profound consequences for both the perceiver and perceived. Ascribing mind confers (...)
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  • Persistence of the Uncanny Valley: The Influence of Repeated Interactions and a Robot's Attitude on its Perception.Jakub A. Złotowski, Hidenobu Sumioka, Shuichi Nishio, Dylan F. Glas, Christoph Bartneck & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Autistic Traits and Sensitivity to Human-Like Features of Robot Behavior.Agnieszka Wykowska, Jasmin Kajopoulos, Karinne Ramirez-Amaro & Gordon Cheng - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (2):219-248.
    This study examined individual differences in sensitivity to human-like features of a robot’s behavior. The paradigm comprised a non-verbal Turing test with a humanoid robot. A “programmed” condition differed from a “human-controlled” condition by onset times of the robot’s eye movements, which were either fixed across trials or modeled after prerecorded human reaction times, respectively. Participants judged whether the robot behavior was programmed or human-controlled, with no information regarding the differences between respective conditions. Autistic traits were measured with the autism-spectrum (...)
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  • Autistic Traits and Sensitivity to Human-Like Features of Robot Behavior.Agnieszka Wykowska, Jasmin Kajopoulos, Karinne Ramirez-Amaro & Gordon Cheng - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (2):219-248.
    This study examined individual differences in sensitivity to human-like features of a robot’s behavior. The paradigm comprised a non-verbal Turing test with a humanoid robot. A “programmed” condition differed from a “human-controlled” condition by onset times of the robot’s eye movements, which were either fixed across trials or modeled after prerecorded human reaction times, respectively. Participants judged whether the robot behavior was programmed or human-controlled, with no information regarding the differences between respective conditions. Autistic traits were measured with the autism-spectrum (...)
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  • Macaque Gaze Responses to the Primatar: A Virtual Macaque Head for Social Cognition Research.Vanessa A. D. Wilson, Carolin Kade, Sebastian Moeller, Stefan Treue, Igor Kagan & Julia Fischer - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Agency, Experience, and Uncanniness in Interactions with Smart Speakers.Staci Meredith Weiss, Peter J. Marshall & Jebediah Taylor - 2020 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 21 (3):329-352.
    ‘Smart’ devices are becoming increasingly ubiquitous. While these sophisticated machines are useful for various purposes, they sometimes evoke feelings of eeriness or discomfort that constitute uncanniness, a much-discussed phenomenon in robotics research. Adult participants rated the uncanniness of a hypothetical future smart speaker that was described as possessing the mental capacities for experience, agency, neither, or both. The novel condition prompting participants to attribute both agency and experience to the speaker filled an important theoretical gap in the literature. Consistent with (...)
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  • Impact of Stimulus Uncanniness on Speeded Response.Kohske Takahashi, Haruaki Fukuda, Kazuyuki Samejima, Katsumi Watanabe & Kazuhiro Ueda - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • There’s More to Humanity Than Meets the Eye: Differences in Gaze Behavior Toward Women and Gynoid Robots.Jessica M. Szczuka & Nicole C. Krämer - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Venturing Into the Uncanny Valley of Mind—The Influence of Mind Attribution on the Acceptance of Human-Like Characters in a Virtual Reality Setting.Jan-Philipp Stein & Peter Ohler - 2017 - Cognition 160 (C):43-50.
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  • Avoidance of Novelty Contributes to the Uncanny Valley.Kyoshiro Sasaki, Keiko Ihaya & Yuki Yamada - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Anthropomorphism in Social Robotics: Empirical Results on Human–Robot Interaction in Hybrid Production Workplaces.Anja Richert, Sarah Müller, Stefan Schröder & Sabina Jeschke - 2018 - AI and Society 33 (3):413-424.
    New forms of artificial intelligence on the one hand and the ubiquitous networking of “everything with everything” on the other hand characterize the fourth industrial revolution. This results in a changed understanding of human–machine interaction, in new models for production, in which man and machine together with virtual agents form hybrid teams. The empirical study “Socializing with robots” aims to gain insight especially into conditions of development and processes of hybrid human–machine teams. In the experiment, human–robot actions and interactions were (...)
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  • Empirical Evaluation of the Uncanny Valley Hypothesis Fails to Confirm the Predicted Effect of Motion.Lukasz Piwek, Lawrie S. McKay & Frank E. Pollick - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):271-277.
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  • Creating “Companions” for Children: The Ethics of Designing Esthetic Features for Robots.Yvette Pearson & Jason Borenstein - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (1):23-31.
  • Empathy with Inanimate Objects and the Uncanny Valley.Catrin Misselhorn - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (3):345-359.
    The term “uncanny valley” goes back to an article of the Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori. He put forward the hypothesis that humanlike objects like certain kinds of robots elicit emotional responses similar to real humans proportionate to their degree of human likeness. Yet, if a certain degree of similarity is reached emotional responses become all of a sudden very repulsive. The corresponding recess in the supposed function is called the uncanny valley. The present paper wants to propose a philosophical explanation (...)
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  • Ethorobotics: A New Approach to Human-Robot Relationship.Ádám Miklósi, Péter Korondi, Vicente Matellán & Márta Gácsi - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  • Hybrids of the Romantic: Frankenstein, Olimpia, and Artificial Life.Silvia Micheletti - 2018 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 41 (2):146-155.
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  • Infant Discrimination of Humanoid Robots.Goh Matsuda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Kazuo Hiraki - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • The Psychosocial Fuzziness of Fear in the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Era and the Role of Robots.Antonella Marchetti, Cinzia Di Dio, Davide Massaro & Federico Manzi - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • A Robot Is Not Worth Another: Exploring Children’s Mental State Attribution to Different Humanoid Robots.Federico Manzi, Giulia Peretti, Cinzia Di Dio, Angelo Cangelosi, Shoji Itakura, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Davide Massaro & Antonella Marchetti - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  • Reducing Consistency in Human Realism Increases the Uncanny Valley Effect; Increasing Category Uncertainty Does Not.Karl F. MacDorman & Debaleena Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Cognition 146 (C):190-205.
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  • Individual Differences Predict Sensitivity to the Uncanny Valley.Karl F. MacDorman & Steven O. Entezari - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (2):141-172.
    It can be creepy to notice that something human-looking is not real. But can sensitivity to this phenomenon, known as the uncanny valley, be predicted from superficially unrelated traits? Based on results from at least 489 participants, this study examines the relation between nine theoretically motivated trait indices and uncanny valley sensitivity, operationalized as increased eerie ratings and decreased warmth ratings for androids presented in videos. Animal Reminder Sensitivity, Neuroticism, its Anxiety facet, and Religious Fundamentalism significantly predicted uncanny valley sensitivity. (...)
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  • Does Japan Really Have Robot Mania? Comparing Attitudes by Implicit and Explicit Measures.Karl F. MacDorman, Sandosh K. Vasudevan & Chin-Chang Ho - 2009 - AI and Society 23 (4):485-510.
    Japan has more robots than any other country with robots contributing to many areas of society, including manufacturing, healthcare, and entertainment. However, few studies have examined Japanese attitudes toward robots, and none has used implicit measures. This study compares attitudes among the faculty of a US and a Japanese university. Although the Japanese faculty reported many more experiences with robots, implicit measures indicated both faculties had more pleasant associations with humans. In addition, although the US faculty reported people were more (...)
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  • Exploring Preschool Children’s Preferences for Artificial Animal Appearances According to the Uncanny Valley Phenomenon.Chia-Chen Lu & Yuan-Ming Lin - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (2):191-213.
    This paper proposes extending the appearance of artefacts from human to zoomorphic on the basis of the uncanny valley phenomenon, while simultaneously realising the effects of bionic species, product realism, and gender differences on preschool children’s preferences for artificial animal appearances. In this study, animal toys were created as stimuli and a three-factor experiment was conducted with preschool children. Overall, the children demonstrated significantly stronger preferences for animal toys with extremely high or moderate realism compared with those with extremely low (...)
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  • Brain–Computer Interfaces and Dualism: A Problem of Brain, Mind, and Body.Joseph Lee - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (1):29-40.
  • A Review of Dynamic Datasets for Facial Expression Research. [REVIEW]Eva G. Krumhuber, Lina Skora, Dennis Küster & Linyun Fou - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):280-292.
    Temporal dynamics have been increasingly recognized as an important component of facial expressions. With the need for appropriate stimuli in research and application, a range of databases of dynamic facial stimuli has been developed. The present article reviews the existing corpora and describes the key dimensions and properties of the available sets. This includes a discussion of conceptual features in terms of thematic issues in dataset construction as well as practical features which are of applied interest to stimulus usage. To (...)
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  • Robot Comedy Lab: Experimenting with the Social Dynamics of Live Performance.Kleomenis Katevas, Patrick G. T. Healey & Matthew Tobias Harris - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • The Role of Social Eye-Gaze in Children’s and Adults’ Ownership Attributions to Robotic Agents in Three Cultures.Patricia Kanngiesser, Shoji Itakura, Yue Zhou, Takayuki Kanda, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Bruce Hood - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (1):1-28.
    Young children often treat robots as social agents after they have witnessed interactions that can be interpreted as social. We studied in three experiments whether four-year-olds from three cultures and adults from two cultures will attribute ownership of objects to a robot that engages in social gaze with a human. Participants watched videos of robot-human interactions, in which objects were possessed or new objects were created. Children and adults applied the same ownership rules to humans and robots – irrespective of (...)
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  • What is a Human? Toward Psychological Benchmarks in the Field of Humanrobot Interaction.Peter H. Kahn, Hiroshi Ishiguro, Batya Friedman, Takayuki Kanda, Nathan G. Freier, Rachel L. Severson & Jessica Miller - 2007 - Interaction Studies 8 (3):363-390.
  • Relationalism Through Social Robotics.Raya A. Jones - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (4):405-424.
    Social robotics is a rapidly developing industry-oriented area of research, intent on making robots in social roles commonplace in the near future. This has led to rising interest in the dynamics as well as ethics of human-robot relationships, described here as a nascent relational turn. A contrast is drawn with the 1990s’ paradigm shift associated with relational-self themes in social psychology. Constructions of the human-robot relationship reproduce the “I-You-Me” dominant model of theorising about the self with biases that (as in (...)
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  • Feeling Robots and Human Zombies: Mind Perception and the Uncanny Valley.Kurt Gray & Daniel M. Wegner - 2012 - Cognition 125 (1):125-130.
    The uncanny valley—the unnerving nature of humanlike robots—is an intriguing idea, but both its existence and its underlying cause are debated. We propose that humanlike robots are not only unnerving, but are so because their appearance prompts attributions of mind. In particular, we suggest that machines become unnerving when people ascribe to them experience, rather than agency. Experiment 1 examined whether a machine’s humanlike appearance prompts both ascriptions of experience and feelings of unease. Experiment 2 tested whether a machine capable (...)
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  • Hacking Into Cybertherapy: Considering a Gesture-Enhanced Therapy with Avatars.Alexander Matthias Gerner - 2020 - Kairos 23 (1):32-87.
    This paper will philosophically extend Julian Leff’s Avatar therapy paradigm for voice-like hallucinations that was initially proposed for treatment-resistant Schizophrenia patients into the realm of gesture-enhanced embodied cognition and Virtual Reality, entitled g+TA. I propose an philosophy of technology approach of embodied rhetorics of triadic kinetic “actions” in the sense of Charles Sanders Peirce that transforms the voice hallucination incorporated by an avatar- and that can confront acousmatic voice-like hallucinations with a method of gesture synchronization and dyssynchronization and gestural refusal (...)
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  • Seeming Autonomy, Technology and the Uncanny Valley.Rasmus Gahrn-Andersen - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):595-603.
    This paper extends Mori’s uncanny valley-hypothesis to include technologies that fail its basic criterion that uncanniness arises when the subject experiences a discrepancy in a machine’s human likeness. In so doing, the paper considers Mori’s hypothesis about the uncanny valley as an instance of what Heidegger calls the ‘challenging revealing’ nature of modern technology. It introduces seeming autonomy and heteronomy as phenomenological categories that ground human being-in-the-world including our experience of things and people. It is suggested that this categorical distinction (...)
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  • Autonomous Technologies in Human Ecologies: Enlanguaged Cognition, Practices and Technology.Rasmus Gahrn-Andersen & Stephen J. Cowley - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):687-699.
    Advanced technologies such as drones, intelligent algorithms and androids have grave implications for human existence. With the purpose of exploring their basis for doing so, the paper proposes a framework for investigating the complex relationship between such devices and human practices and language-mediated cognition. Specifically, it centers on the importance of the typically neglected intermediate layer of culture which not only drives both technophobia and philia but also, more fundamentally, connects pre-reflective experience and socio-material practices by placing advanced technologies in (...)
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  • Stimulus-Category Competition, Inhibition, and Affective Devaluation: A Novel Account of the Uncanny Valley.Anne E. Ferrey, Tyler J. Burleigh & Mark J. Fenske - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Service Robotics: Do You Know Your New Companion? Framing an Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment.Indra Spiecker Genannt Döhmann, Ingrid Ott, Mathias Gutmann, Martin Fischer, Thomas Dreier, Rüdiger Dillmann & Michael Decker - 2011 - Poiesis and Praxis 8 (1):25-44.
    Service-Robotic—mainly defined as “non-industrial robotics”—is identified as the next economical success story to be expected after robots have been ubiquitously implemented into industrial production lines. Under the heading of service-robotic, we found a widespread area of applications reaching from robotics in agriculture and in the public transportation system to service robots applied in private homes. We propose for our interdisciplinary perspective of technology assessment to take the human user/worker as common focus. In some cases, the user/worker is the effective subject (...)
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  • Is It the Real Deal? Perception of Virtual Characters Versus Humans: An Affective Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective.Aline W. de Borst & Beatrice de Gelder - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Going Beyond the “Synthetic Method”: New Paradigms Cross-Fertilizing Robotics and Cognitive Neuroscience.Edoardo Datteri, Thierry Chaminade & Donato Romano - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    In so-called ethorobotics and robot-supported social cognitive neurosciences, robots are used as scientific tools to study animal behavior and cognition. Building on previous epistemological analyses of biorobotics, in this article it is argued that these two research fields, widely differing from one another in the kinds of robots involved and in the research questions addressed, share a common methodology, which significantly differs from the “synthetic method” that, until recently, dominated biorobotics. The methodological novelty of this strategy, the research opportunities that (...)
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  • Robots, Law and the Retribution Gap.John Danaher - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (4):299–309.
    We are living through an era of increased robotisation. Some authors have already begun to explore the impact of this robotisation on legal rules and practice. In doing so, many highlight potential liability gaps that might arise through robot misbehaviour. Although these gaps are interesting and socially significant, they do not exhaust the possible gaps that might be created by increased robotisation. In this article, I make the case for one of those alternative gaps: the retribution gap. This gap arises (...)
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  • Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-Evolution.Luisa Damiano & Paul Dumouchel - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:468.
    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents - social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic (...)
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  • A Truly Human Interface: Interacting Face-to-Face with Someone Whose Words Are Determined by a Computer Program.Kevin Corti & Alex Gillespie - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Comprehension and Engagement in Survey Interviews with Virtual Agents.Frederick G. Conrad, Michael F. Schober, Matt Jans, Rachel A. Orlowski, Daniel Nielsen & Rachel Levenstein - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • The Effects of Culture and Context on Perceptions of Robotic Facial Expressions.Casey C. Bennett & Selma Šabanović - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (2):272-302.
    We report two experimental studies of human perceptions of robotic facial expressions while systematically varying context effects and the cultural background of subjects. Except for Fear, East Asian and Western subjects were not significantly different in recognition rates, and, while Westerners were better at judging affect from mouth movement alone, East Asians were not any better at judging affect based on eye/brow movement alone. Moreover, context effects appeared capable of over-riding such cultural differences, most notably for Fear. The results seem (...)
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  • The Effects of Culture and Context on Perceptions of Robotic Facial Expressions.Casey C. Bennett & Selma Šabanović - 2015 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 16 (2):272-302.
    We report two experimental studies of human perceptions of robotic facial expressions while systematically varying context effects and the cultural background of subjects. Except for Fear, East Asian and Western subjects were not significantly different in recognition rates, and, while Westerners were better at judging affect from mouth movement alone, East Asians were not any better at judging affect based on eye/brow movement alone. Moreover, context effects appeared capable of over-riding such cultural differences, most notably for Fear. The results seem (...)
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  • Theory of Mind: Mechanisms, Methods, and New Directions.Lindsey J. Byom & Bilge Mutlu - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • A Reappraisal of the Uncanny Valley: Categorical Perception or Frequency-Based Sensitization?Tyler J. Burleigh & Jordan R. Schoenherr - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • A Challenge to the Study of Individual Differences in Uncanny Valley Sensitivity: The Importance of Looking at Individual-Level Response Patterns.Tyler J. Burleigh - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (2):186-192.
  • A Challenge to the Study of Individual Differences in Uncanny Valley Sensitivity: The Importance of Looking at Individual-Level Response Patterns.Tyler J. Burleigh - 2015 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 16 (2):186-192.
  • A Challenge to the Study of Individual Differences in Uncanny Valley Sensitivity.Tyler J. Burleigh - 2015 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 16 (2):186-192.
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  • Artificial Intelligence Is Stupid and Causal Reasoning Will Not Fix It.J. Mark Bishop - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Artificial Neural Networks have reached “grandmaster” and even “super-human” performance across a variety of games, from those involving perfect information, such as Go, to those involving imperfect information, such as “Starcraft”. Such technological developments from artificial intelligence labs have ushered concomitant applications across the world of business, where an “AI” brand-tag is quickly becoming ubiquitous. A corollary of such widespread commercial deployment is that when AI gets things wrong—an autonomous vehicle crashes, a chatbot exhibits “racist” behavior, automated credit-scoring processes “discriminate” (...)
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