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  1. Antigone's Autonomy.David N. McNeill - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):411 - 441.
    Abstract Sophocles' Antigone contains the first recorded instance of the word α?τ ? ?????, the source for our word ?autonomous?. I argue that reflection upon the human aspiration toward autonomy is central to that work. I begin by focusing on the difficulty readers of the play have determining whether Antigone's actions in the play should be considered autonomous and then suggest that recognizing this difficulty is crucial to a proper understanding of the play. The very aspects of Antigone's character that (...)
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  • What Keeps the Earth in Its Place? The Concept of Stability in Plato and Aristotle.Giora Hon & Bernard R. Goldstein - 2008 - Centaurus 50 (4):305-323.
  • Fallacies and Formal Logic in Aristotle.David Hitchcock - 2000 - History and Philosophy of Logic 21 (3):207-221.
    The taxonomy and analysis of fallacies in Aristotle's Sophistical Refutations pre-date the formal logic of his Prior Analytics A4-6. Of the 64 fully described examples of ?sophistical refutations? which are fallacious because they are only apparently valid, 49 have the wrong number of premisses or the wrong form of premiss or conclusion for analysis by the Prior Analytics theory of the categorical syllogism. The rest Aristotle either frames so that they do not look like categorical syllogisms or analyses in a (...)
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  • Towards a Parasitic Ethics.James Burton & Daisy Tam - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (4):103-125.
    The parasite is widely conceived as a negative figure that takes without giving; perceived as an agent of corruption and destruction, it is subjected to programmes of eradication and expulsion across cultural, economic, political and ethical contexts. This paper offers an alternative approach to the status of parasitic relations in light of Michel Serres’s The Parasite, elaborated through ethnographic research into the after-hours culture and hidden economy of London’s Borough Market. We highlight the mutual dependence of agents in host-parasite networks (...)
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  • An Act of Methodology: A Document in Madness—Writing Ophelia.Jenny Steinnes - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (8):818-830.
    This paper is an attempt to stage some questions concerning methodology and education, inspired by Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet and by Jacques Derrida's poetic philosophical oeuvres. What are at stake are the long traditions of preferences of sanity over madness, friend over enemy, male over female and of clean, unambiguous univocal language over the poetic. I will argue that educators will have an extra responsibility towards challenging the ancient tradition of phallogocentrism, both in our teaching and in our research.
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  • ?Only in the Contemplation of Beauty is Human Life Worth Living? Plato, Symposium 211d.Alexander Nehamas - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):1–18.
  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Four Educators in Plato's Theaetetus.Avi I. Mintz - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):657-673.
    Scholars who have taken interest in Theaetetus' educational theme argue that Plato contrasts an inferior, even dangerous, sophistic education to a superior, philosophical, Socratic education. I explore the contrasting exhortations, methods, ideals and epistemological foundations of Socratic and Protagorean education and suggest that Socrates' treatment of Protagoras as educator is far less dismissive than others claim. Indeed, Plato, in Theaetetus, offers a qualified defence of both Socrates and Protagoras. Socrates and Protagoras each dwell in the middle ground between the extremes (...)
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  • N.T. Wright's Understanding of the Nature of Jesus' Risen Body.Joseph J. Smith - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (1):29-73.
  • David the Invincible: Philosophy as a Lifestyle.Silva Petrosyan - 2016 - Wisdom 2 (7):148.
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  • II—Nil Admirari? Uses and Abuses of Admiration.T. H. Irwin - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):223-248.
    Both Plato and Aristotle have something to say about admiration. But in order to know where to look, and in order to appreciate the force of their remarks, we need to sketch a little of the ethical background that they presuppose. I begin, therefore, with ancient Greek ethics in the wider sense, and discuss the treatment of admiration and related attitudes by Homer, Herodotus, and other pre-Platonic sources. Then I turn to the views of Plato, Adam Smith, Aristotle and Cicero. (...)
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  • Presentació del Diccionari manual grec clàssic-català de l'editorial Vox.Autors Reglà, Remei Tomàs, Guillem Cintas & Priscila Borrell - 2012 - Methodos. Revista de didàctica dels estudis clàssics 1:299.
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  • Aristotle’s Assertoric Syllogistic and Modern Relevance Logic.Philipp Julius6 Steinkrüger - 2015 - Synthese 192 (5):1413-1444.
    This paper sets out to evaluate the claim that Aristotle’s Assertoric Syllogistic is a relevance logic or shows significant similarities with it. I prepare the grounds for a meaningful comparison by extracting the notion of relevance employed in the most influential work on modern relevance logic, Anderson and Belnap’s Entailment. This notion is characterized by two conditions imposed on the concept of validity: first, that some meaning content is shared between the premises and the conclusion, and second, that the premises (...)
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  • Colloquium 2: Parmenides’ System: The Logical Origins of His Monism.Barbara Sattler - 2011 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):25-90.
    The paper demonstrates that Parmenides’ monism is a logical consequence of his criteria for philosophy, in conjunction with the logical operators he uses, and their holistic connection. Parmenides, I argue, is the first philosopher to set out explicit criteria for philosophy, establishing as criterion not only consistency, but also what I call rational admissibility, the requirement when giving an account of something that the account be based on rational analysis and can withstand rational scrutiny. I give a detailed account of (...)
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  • Reversals of Fire: The Philosophy of Heraclitus as Thematic Subtext of Julio Cortázar's 'All Fires the Fire'.Danny Praet & Aagje Monballieu - unknown
    Cortázar collected translations of Heraclitus and made numerous references to his fragments. The critics have neglected the influence of this Presocratic philosopher on Cortázar. This paper studies ‘Todos los fuegos el fuego’ and aims to show that, in writing this story, Cortázar found inspiration in Heraclitus’ theory of Fire and the Logos (Word-Reason) as the ruling principles of the universe. Heraclitus is mostly known through his river-fragments as the philosopher of the everlasting flux (panta rhei), but his philosophy of time (...)
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  • New Lights on the Anonymus Londiniensis Papyrus.Jordi Crespo Saumell - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):120.
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  • The Psychical Forces in Plato’s Phaedrus.Eva Buccioni - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):331 – 357.
  • Commentary on Miller.Victor Caston - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):214-230.
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  • Ouk éstin antilégein: Antístenes tras la máscara de Parménides en el Sofista de Platón.Valeria Sonna - 2017 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 27:15-38.
    RESUMEN El tema principal de este trabajo es la posición que suele atribuirse a Antístenes de que es imposible contradecir o decir falsedades y su vinculación con el problema metafísico central del Sofista, el del No Ser. La imposibilidad de contradecir es presentada como la posición opuesta a la de la sofística entendida como contradictor en Sof., 232b y ss., cuyo relativismo es asociado con la figura de Protágoras, más específicamente con su tesis de que sobre cualquier cuestión hay dos (...)
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  • Democracia, control político y rendición de cuentas. El antecedente griego.Alejandra Ríos Ramírez & Laura Fuentes Vélez - 2018 - Co-herencia 15 (58):87-109.
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  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Aristotelic Learning Through the Arts.Guillermo Marini - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):171-184.
    The field of Philosophy and Education seems to be experiencing a renewed interest in the work of Aristotle. As recently reviewed by Curren (Oxf Rev Educ 36(5):543–559, 2010), most of this attention aligns with the virtue ethics movement where themes like moral development in education, and the inquiry on human flourishing as the aim of education are prevalent. For sources, this scholarship relies heavily and extensively on the Nicomachean Ethics and Politics’ Book VIII where Aristotle develops his single, clearly defined (...)
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  • Antiphasis as Homonym in Aristotle.Robert Laurence Gallagher - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (4):317-331.
    Antiphasis is a case of core-dependent homonymy, and has three significations in Aristotle's philosophy: antiphasis as an opposition between propositions ; antiphasis as the opposition between ‘subject’ and ‘not a subject’ in coming-to-be and perishing ; and antiphasis as the opposition between possession and privation . Argument based on the fifth type of priority described in Cat. 12 shows that, for Aristotle, the ontological significations are prior to the propositional.
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  • Aristotle’s Conception of Practical Wisdom and What It Means for Moral Education in Schools.Atli Harðarson - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1518-1527.
    Aristotle took practical wisdom to include cleverness, and something more. The hard question, that he does not explicitly answer, is what this something more is. On my interpretation, the practically wise are not merely more knowledgeable about what is good for people. They are also better able to discern all the values at stake, in whatever circumstances they find themselves. This is an ability that good people develop, typically rather late in life, provided they are masters of their own affairs. (...)
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  • Contours of Cairo Revolt: Street Semiology, Values and Political Affordances.Matthew Crippen - 2021 - Topoi 40 (2):451-460.
    This article contemplates symbols and values inscribed on Cairo’s landscape during the 2011 revolution and the period since, focusing on Tahrir Square and the role of the Egyptian flag in street discourses there. I start by briefly pondering how intertwined popular narratives readied the square and flag as emblems of dissent. Next I examine how these appropriations shaped protests in the square, and how military authorities who retook control in 2013 re-coopted the square and flag, with the reabsorption of each (...)
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  • Plato and Socrates: From an Educator of Childhood to a Childlike Educator?Walter Omar Kohan - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):313-325.
    This paper deals with two forms of education—Platonic and Socratic. The former educates childhood to transform it into what it ought to be. The latter does not form childhood, but makes education childlike. To unfold the philosophical and pedagogical dimensions of this opposition, the first part of the paper highlights the way in which philosophy is presented indirectly in some of Plato’s dialogues, beginning with a characterisation that Socrates makes of himself in the dialogue Phaedrus. The second part details Plato’s (...)
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  • The Place of the Proper Name in the Topographies of the Paradiso.William Franke - 2012 - Speculum 87 (4):1089-1124.
    There is an obvious paradox in any attempt to map the topography of Paradise, for Paradise, theologians assure us, is outside of space as well as time. Yet mapping Paradise is what Dante's poem, the Paradiso, attempts to do. For the two preceding realms of the afterlife, hell and purgatory, Dante provides numerous finely articulated descriptions of rigorously ordered regions. And again for Paradise, the variegated states of the souls making up the spiritual order of the realm are expressed very (...)
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  • Semiotics and Bible Translation.Robert Hodgson - 2007 - Semiotica 2007 (163):163-185.
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  • The Byzantine Understanding of the Qur՚Anic Term Al-Ṣamad and the Greek Translation of the Qur՚An.Christos Simelidis - 2011 - Speculum 86 (4):887-913.
    In his 1988 University Lecture in Religion at Arizona State University, Josef van Ess argued for a widespread concept of a “compact” God in early Islam. The notion is expressed by ṣamad in Sura 112.2, an enigmatic word, which “in the first half of the second Islamic century … was understood as meaning ‘massive, compact.’” There is Islamic evidence for this, van Ess argued: “The best testimony, however, comes from outside Islam: Theodore Abū Qurra, bishop of Ḥarrān in Upper Mesopotamia (...)
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  • Classifying Unknowns: The Idiopathic Problem.Thomas Beaney - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):126-130.
    The term, idiopathic, emerged as a key concept in the classification of disease in the 18th century and has become ingrained in our terminology in defining diseases and their aetiologies throughout all fields of medicine. Despite, or perhaps because of this, little has been written about the meaning or meanings of the word itself. Although most medical professionals will be able to offer a definition of idiopathic, different definitions of the word are in use and are often confused or used (...)
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  • Europe and the Stranger.Rodolphe Gasché - 2016 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 47 (3):292-305.
    ABSTRACTWith few exceptions, the prominent role of the Stranger in Plato’s late dialogue on the Sophist has drawn little attention in Plato scholarship. Yet, in this dialogue Plato charges the expatriated Stranger, who, furthermore, lacks a patronym and thus is not identifiable, remaining a stranger to the end, with the task not only of rejecting all philosophy hitherto as nothing more than a kind of storytelling about Being, but also of committing the parricide of Parmenides, the father of Greek philosophy (...)
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  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
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  • Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult.Margaret Graver - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well understood: the (...)
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  • Negation and Quantification in Aristotle.Michael V. Wedin - 1990 - History and Philosophy of Logic 11 (2):131-150.
    Two main claims are defended. The first is that negative categorical statements are not to be accorded existential import insofar as they figure in the square of opposition. Against Kneale and others, it is argued that Aristotle formulates his o statements, for example, precisely to avoid existential commitment. This frees Aristotle's square from a recent charge of inconsistency. The second claim is that the logic proper provides much thinner evidence than has been supposed for what appears to be the received (...)
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  • Chorography: History, Theory and Potential for Archaeological Research.D. Rohl - unknown
    Chorography is a little-known field of theory and practice concerned with the significance of place, regional description/characterization, local history, and representation. A well-established discipline and methodology with demonstrable roots in antiquity and an important role in the development of antiquarian research, regional studies and the establishment of modern archaeology, chorography is useful for understanding the history of scholarship and may continue to provide sound theoretical principles and practical methods for new explorations of archaeological monuments and landscapes. This paper discusses the (...)
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  • El espacio metaperformativo en Odisea, 11.María del Pilar Fernández Deagustini - 2008 - Synthesis (la Plata) 15:107-131.
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  • Becoming Who We Are: Democracy and the Political Problem of Hope.Andrew Norris - 2008 - Critical Horizons 9 (1):77-89.
    In this article I argue that hope is rightly numbered by Hesiod among the evils, as hope cannot be separated from an awareness of the inadequacy of one's current state. Political hope for democrats in particular is tied to the awareness that we have not yet realized ourselves, that, to paraphrase Pindar, we have not yet become who we are. I argue that, although Rorty comes close to articulating this in his book Achieving Our Country, his emphasis on pride ultimately (...)
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  • Chrysippus Confronts the Liar: The Case for Stoic Cassationism.Michael Papazian - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):197-214.
    The Stoic philosopher Chrysippus wrote extensively on the liar paradox, but unfortunately the extant testimony on his response to the paradox is meager and mainly hostile. Modern scholars, beginning with Alexander Rüstow in the first decade of the twentieth century, have attempted to reconstruct Chrysippus? solution. Rüstow argued that Chrysippus advanced a cassationist solution, that is, one in which sentences such as ?I am speaking falsely? do not express propositions. Two more recent scholars, Walter Cavini and Mario Mignucci, have rejected (...)
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  • Reading Communities and Hippocratism in Hellenistic Medicine.Marquis Berrey - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (3):465-487.
    ArgumentThe sect of ancient Greek physicians who believed that medical knowledge came from personal experience also read the Hippocratic Corpus intensively. While previous scholarship has concentrated on the contributions of individual physicians to ancient scholarship on Hippocrates, this article seeks to identify those characteristics of Empiricist reading methodology that drove an entire medical community to credit Hippocrates with medical authority. To explain why these physicians appealed to Hippocrates’ authority, I deploy surviving testimonia and fragments to describe the skills, practices, and (...)
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  • Is Eco-Theologian Thomas Berry a Thomist?Marie George - 2019 - Scientia et Fides 7 (1):47-71.
    I examine the views of the renowned Catholic environmentalist, Thomas Berry, C.P., by comparing them with those of Thomas Aquinas, an author Berry frequently references. I intend to show that while the two share a number of views in common, ultimately the two diverge on many foundational issues, resulting in differing conclusions as to how we should regard and treat the environment. Aquinas upholds divine transcendence, whereas Berry regards the notion of divine transcendence to lead to the exploitation of creation (...)
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  • Plotinus on the Making of Matter Part III: The Essential Background.Denis O’Brien - 2012 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 6 (1):27-80.
    Abstract Plotinus did not set out to be obscure. Difficulties of interpretation arise partly from his style of writing, compressed, elliptical, allusive. The allusions, easily enough recognisable by those he was writing for, are often not recognised at all by the modern reader who no longer has at his fingertips the texts of Plato and Aristotle that Plotinus undoubtedly alludes to, but whose authors he has no need to name. So it is pre-eminently with his subtle use of earlier ideas (...)
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  • “…As We Forgive Those Who Trespass Against Us…”: Theological Reflections On Sin And Guilt In The Hospital Environment.Kurt Schmidt - 2005 - Christian Bioethics 11 (2):201-219.
    In general parlance the term sin has lost its existential meaning. Originally a Jewish-Christian term within a purely religious context, referring to a wrongdoing with regard to God, sin has slowly become reduced to guilt in the course of the secularization process. Guilt refers to a wrongdoing, especially with regard to fellow human beings. It also refers to errors of judgement with what can be tragic consequences. These errors can occur whenever human beings are called upon to act, including the (...)
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  • The Spatiality of Pain.Abraham Olivier - 2006 - South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):336-349.
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  • The Iliad, the Odyssey and Their Audiences.Andrew Dalby - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):269-279.
    It has been easy to take the apparently detached viewpoint of the two early Greek epics as actually objective, a window on a ‘Heroic Age’, on a ‘Homeric society’ and its values. We used to ask whether ‘Homeric society’ belongs to the poets' own time or to some earlier one. We still ask how to characterize and explain the ways in which the ‘Homeric world’ differs from any world that we can accept as having existed: we answer with phrases such (...)
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  • Masculinity as Virility in Tahar Ben Jelloun's Work.Lahoucine Ouzgane - 1997 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 4 (1):1-13.
  • Píndaro y el límite de la abundancia.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2010 - Myrtia. Revista de Filología Clásica 25:25-42.
  • Managerialism and “Infinite Human Resourcefulness”: A Commentary on the “Therapeutic Habitus”, “Derecognition of Finitude” and the Modern Sense of Self.Bogdan Costea, Norman Crump & Kostas Amiridis - 2007 - Journal for Cultural Research 11 (3):245-264.
  • Dante's Empyrean and the Eye of God.Richard Kay - 2003 - Speculum 78 (1):37-65.
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