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  1. Towards an Understanding of Social Responsibility Within the Church of England.Krystin Zigan & Alan Le Grys - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):535-560.
    This research explores the interplay of individual, organisational and institutional variables that produce the current pattern of social responsibility practices within a specific religious organisation, namely the Church of England. By combining elements primarily of neo-institutional theory with Bourdieu’s theory of practice, we construct a theoretical framework to examine the extent to which social responsibility activity is modified or informed by a distinctive faith perspective. Given that neo-institutional theory predicts a convergence of structures and practices between different organisations operating in (...)
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  • The Glocalization of Responsible Investment: Contextualization Work in France and Québec. [REVIEW]Jean-Pascal Gond & Eva Boxenbaum - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):707-721.
    This study investigates the institutional work that underlies the diffusion of responsible investment (RI) and enhances its adaptation to local settings. Building on institutional theory and actor–network theory, we advance the concept of contextualization work to describe the institutional work that sustains RI glocalization. Empirical data from two case studies highlight how entrepreneurial actors imported the notion of RI from the US to France and Québec. Our findings uncover three types of contextualization work—filtering, repurposing, and coupling—that sustain RI glocalization, and (...)
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  • Communicated Accountability by Faith-Based Charity Organisations.Sofia Yasmin, Roszaini Haniffa & Mohammad Hudaib - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):1-21.
    The issue of communicated accountability is particularly important in Faith-Based Charity Organisations as the donated funds and use of those funds are often meant to fulfil religious obligations for the well-being of society. Integrating Stewart’s (1984) ladder of accountability with the Statement of Recommended Practice guidance for charities, this paper examines communicated accountability practices of Muslim and Christian Charity Organisations in England and Wales. Our content analysis results indicate communicated accountability to be generally limited, focusing on providing basic descriptive information (...)
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  • Competing Logics in the Islamic Funds Industry: A Market Logic Versus a Religious Logic.Khaled O. Alotaibi, Christine Helliar & Nongnuch Tantisantiwong - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):207-230.
    In contrast to the conventional fund management industry with a profit-oriented logic based on risk and return, ethical and faith-based funds should follow the religious principles of their investment-style philosophy. Islamic funds should obey the theological teachings of the primary sources of Islam, the Quran and Sunnah, as stakeholders expect these religious teachings to influence the investment decisions of fund managers. In practice, Islamic fund managers use Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions ’s screening criteria, based on secondary (...)
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  • Money and the Commons: An Investigation of Complementary Currencies and Their Ethical Implications.Camille Meyer & Marek Hudon - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):277-292.
    The commons is a concept increasingly used with the promise of creating new collective wealth. In the aftermath of the economic and financial crises, finance and money have been criticized and redesigned to serve the collective interest. In this article, we analyze three types of complementary currency systems: community currencies, inter-enterprise currencies, and cryptocurrencies. We investigate whether these systems can be considered as commons. To address this question, we use two main theoretical frameworks that are usually separate: the “new commons” (...)
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  • Social Shareholder Engagement: The Dynamics of Voice and Exit. [REVIEW]Jennifer Goodman, Céline Louche, Katinka C. van Cranenburgh & Daniel Arenas - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-18.
    Investors concerned about the social and environmental impact of the companies they invest in are increasingly choosing to use voice over exit as a strategy. This article addresses the question of how and why the voice and exit options (Hirschman 1970) are used in social shareholder engagement (SSE) by religious organisations. Using an inductive case study approach, we examine seven engagements by three religious organisations considered to be at the forefront of SSE. We analyse the full engagement process rather than (...)
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  • Does an Asset Owner’s Institutional Setting Influence Its Decision to Sign the Principles for Responsible Investment?Andreas G. F. Hoepner, Arleta A. A. Majoch & Xiao Y. Zhou - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):389-414.
    From a simple idea to unite asset owners in their quest for responsible investment at its launch in April 2006, the United Nations supported Principles for Responsible Investment have grown in just one decade into an initiative with more than 1500 fee-paying signatories. Jointly, the PRI’s signatories hold assets worth more than $80 trillion, making it one of the more prevalent not-for-profit organizations worldwide. Furthermore, the PRI’s ambitious mission to transform the financial system at large into a more sustainable one (...)
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  • What’s in a Name: An Analysis of Impact Investing Understandings by Academics and Practitioners.Anna Katharina Höchstädter & Barbara Scheck - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):449-475.
    Recently, there has been much talk of impact investing. Around the world, specialized intermediaries have appeared, mainstream financial players and governments have become involved, renowned universities have included impact investing courses in their curriculum, and a myriad of practitioner contributions have been published. Despite all this activity, conceptual clarity remains an issue: The absence of a uniform definition, the interchangeable use of alternative terms and unclear boundaries to related concepts such as socially responsible investment are being criticized. This article aims (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility as a Strategic Shield Against Costs of Earnings Management Practices.Jennifer Martínez-Ferrero, Shantanu Banerjee & Isabel María García-Sánchez - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):305-324.
    We highlight how Corporate Social Responsibility can be strategically used against the negative perception from earnings management. Using international data, we analyse the effect of CSR and EM on the cost of capital and corporate reputation. Results confirm that CSR strategy is positively valued by investors and other stakeholders. Contrary to EM, CSR has a positive effect on corporate reputation and lowers the cost of capital. In addition, we also find that the favourable effect of CSR on cost of capital (...)
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