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  1. The High-Hanging Fruit of the Gender Revolution: A Model of Social Reproduction and Social Change.David Calnitsky - 2019 - Sociological Theory 37 (1):35-61.
    This article proposes an abstract sociological model of stable patriarchal social relations and feminist social change. I describe a patriarchal equilibrium of gender inequality and propose an approach for thinking about how various kinds of interventions can short-circuit the system, pushing it onto a new equilibrium path. In particular, I focus on possible interventions into parental leave policy, describing their social structural and cultural ramifications as well as a range of objections to them. However, more important than the specific interventions (...)
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  • Recovering the Feminine Other: Masculinity, Femininity, and Gender Hegemony. [REVIEW]Mimi Schippers - 2007 - Theory and Society 36 (1):85-102.
  • “Said and Done” Versus “Saying and Doing”: Gendering Practices, Practicing Gender at Work.Patricia Yancey Martin - 2003 - Gender and Society 17 (3):342-366.
    Recently, the study of gender has focused on processes by which gender is brought into social relations through interaction. This article explores implications of a two-sided dynamic—gendering practices and practicing of gender—for understanding gendering processes in formal organizations. Using stories from interviews and participant observation in multinational corporations, the author explores the practicing of gender at work. She defines practicing gender as a moving phenomenon that is done quickly, directionally, and nonreflexively; is informed by liminal awareness; and is in concert (...)
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  • (Re)Producing Cyborgs: Biomedicalizing Abortion Through the Congressional Debate Over Fetal Pain.Ashlyn Jaeger - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (1):74-96.
    The scientific and political debate over whether a fetus can experience pain highlights a vital and controversial boundary for governance—the boundary of human life. I use the 2012 and 2013 US federal debates over twenty-week abortion bans to investigate how personhood is constructed in a society transformed by biomedical science and technology in the United States. Although those who support and oppose the bill take different stances on abortion regulation, each relies on biomedical knowledge and risk assessment to substantiate claims. (...)
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  • Breastfeeding and Sexual Difference: Queering Irigaray.Robyn Lee - 2018 - Feminist Theory 19 (1):77-94.
    It is commonly assumed that only women, and in particular women who have recently given birth, are able to breastfeed. However, through induced lactation, adoptive mothers, fathers and trans people have begun breastfeeding with greater frequency. Although breastfeeding is often regarded as a paradigmatic example of sexual difference, it actually exposes the instability of binary categories of sex. Luce Irigaray insists that sexual difference demands a new poetics, a language that is dynamic and fluid, capable of expressing difference while always (...)
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  • From Community to Coalition.Sylvia Walby - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):113-135.
    This article considers how to go beyond the polarities of individualism and communitarianism in the analysis of contemporary political cultures in a global era. It is argued that there is a need to ground analysis in a presumption of social networks and coalitions, rather than in the concept of recognition. Political cultures are always already riddled with complexity and cross-cutting relations with other political cultures, coalitions and alliances. Within the politics of recognition, the conventional operationalization of the concept of the (...)
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  • The Tragedy of the Freelance Hustler: Hegel, Gender and Civil Society.Laura Brace - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (3):329-347.
    This paper explores the gendering of civil society by focusing on the moral campaigns against wet nursing and in favour of maternal feeding in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, drawing attention to the overlap between the family and market society. It argues that the organization of sexual difference is central to the social world and to the idea of civil society in Hegel's Philosophy of Right. Men enjoyed the benefits of ethical incorporation into a rich version of civil (...)
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  • Doing Murga, Undoing Gender: Feminist Carnival in Argentina.Michael S. O’Brien & Julia Mcreynolds-Pérez - 2020 - Gender and Society 34 (3):413-436.
    Murga porteña, the satirical street theatre tradition associated with Carnival in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is historically a strongly patriarchal institution. Prominent roles such as reciting poetry, singing, and playing percussion instruments have been reserved exclusively for men. As the feminist movement in Argentina has grown in visibility and importance in recent years, feminist murga participants disrupted these patriarchal patterns. Women murga performers have begun to use murga as a space for feminist practice, both by creating women-only organizations to learn murga (...)
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  • Mothers, Fathers, and “Mathers”: Negotiating a Lesbian Co-Parental Identity.Jonniann Butterfield & Irene Padavic - 2011 - Gender and Society 25 (2):176-196.
    This article argues that to gain a more complete understanding of how lesbian families experience parenthood outside of the heterosexual context, scholars must consider how co-parents negotiate a parental identity, rather than presuming that women parents want to mother. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 17 women in a state that denies them parental legal rights, this article asks how a non—biologically related and non—legally related woman parent determines a parental identity in a social system that continually reminds her of her (...)
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  • “I Would Never Be a Secretary”: Reinforcing Gender in Segregated and Integrated Occupations.Ivy Kennelly - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (5):603-624.
    Gender affects us, but we also affect gender. This study reveals some of the ways women in two types of occupations—furniture sales and secretarial—shape the system of gender. As they struggle to define their identities within a segregated occupational structure, these women evoke notions of their differences from men and from other women, as well as their similarities to each group, in ways that are consistent with feminist theoretical positions on these issues. I argue that the ways these women define (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Beth B. Hess - 2000 - Gender and Society 14 (6):827-829.
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  • Book Review: Sexuality and Democracy: Identities and Strategies in Lesbian and Gay Politics. [REVIEW]Angelia Wilson & Sara Scott - 2001 - Feminist Theory 2 (1):134-136.
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