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  1. The Binding Problem 2.0: Beyond Perceptual Features.Xinchi Yu & Ellen Lau - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (2):e13244.
    The “binding problem” has been a central question in vision science for some 30 years: When encoding multiple objects or maintaining them in working memory, how are we able to represent the correspondence between a specific feature and its corresponding object correctly? In this letter we argue that the boundaries of this research program in fact extend far beyond vision, and we call for coordinated pursuit across the broader cognitive science community of this central question for cognition, which we dub (...)
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  • A Plea for Epistemic Sortalism:認識的な種別概念論を擁護する.Yoshiyuki Yokoro - 2018 - Journal of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 45 (1-2):35-50.
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  • The role of language in acquiring object kind concepts in infancy.Fei Xu - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):223-250.
  • The emergence of kind concepts: a rejoinder to Needham and Baillargeon.Fei Xu & Susan Carey - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):285-301.
  • The emergence of kind concepts: a rejoinder to Needham and Baillargeon.Fei Xu & Susan Carey - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):285-301.
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  • Large number discrimination in 6-month-old infants.Fei Xu & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 2000 - Cognition 74 (1):1-11.
    Six-month-old infants discriminate between large sets of objects on the basis of numerosity when other extraneous variables are controlled, provided that the sets to be discriminated differ by a large ratio (8 vs. 16 but not 8 vs. 12). The capacities to represent approximate numerosity found in adult animals and humans evidently develop in human infants prior to language and symbolic counting.
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  • Infants' ability to use object kind information for object individuation.Fei Xu, Susan Carey & Jenny Welch - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):137-166.
  • Psychological foundations of number: numerical competence in human infants.Karen Wynn - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (8):296-303.
  • Priming infants to attend to color and pattern information in an individuation task.Teresa Wilcox & Catherine Chapa - 2004 - Cognition 90 (3):265-302.
  • Object individuation: infants’ use of shape, size, pattern, and color.Teresa Wilcox - 1999 - Cognition 72 (2):125-166.
  • Detecting continuity violations in infancy: a new account and new evidence from covering and tube events.Su-hua Wang, Renée Baillargeon & Sarah Paterson - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2):129-173.
  • Individuation of objects and events: a developmental study.Laura Wagner & Susan Carey - 2003 - Cognition 90 (2):163-191.
  • Do We See Facts?Alfredo Vernazzani - 2020 - Mind and Language (4):674-693.
    Philosophers of perception frequently assume that we see actual states of affairs, or facts. Call this claim factualism. In his book, William Fish suggests that factualism is supported by phenomenological observation as well as by experimental studies on multiple object tracking and dynamic feature-object integration. In this paper, I examine the alleged evidence for factualism, focusing mainly on object detection and tracking. I argue that there is no scientific evidence for factualism. This conclusion has implications for studies on the phenomenology (...)
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  • Thisness and Visual Objects.Błażej Skrzypulec - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (1):17-32.
    According to the traditional view, visual objects can be characterized as bundles of features and locations. This initially plausible idea is contested within the contemporary psychology and philosophy of perception, where it is claimed that the visual system can represent objects as merely ‘this’ or ‘that’, in abstraction from their qualities. In this paper, I consider whether philosophical and psychological arguments connected with the rejection of the ‘bundle’ view of visual objects show that it is needed to postulate an additional, (...)
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  • Do we need visual subjects?Błażej Skrzypulec - 2018 - Philosophical Psychology 31 (4):574-594.
    It is widely accepted within contemporary philosophy of perception that the content of visual states cannot be characterized simply as a list of represented features. This is because such characterization leads to the so-called, “Many Properties problem”, i.e. it does not allow us to explain how the visual system is able to distinguish between scenes containing different arrangements of the same features. The usual solution to the Many Properties problem is to characterize some elements of content as subjects, to which (...)
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  • Bradley’s Regress and Visual Content.Błażej Skrzypulec - 2019 - Axiomathes 29 (2):155-172.
    According to the well-known Bradley’s Regress argument, one cannot explain the unity of states of affairs by referring to relations combining objects with properties. This argument has been widely discussed within analytic metaphysics, but has not been recognized as relevant for the philosophy of perception. I argue that the mainstream characterization of visual content is threatened by the Bradley’s Regress, and the most influential metaphysical solutions to the regress argument cannot be applied in the context of visual content. However, I (...)
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  • Précis of neuroconstructivism: How the brain constructs cognition.Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):321-331.
    Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition proposes a unifying framework for the study of cognitive development that brings together (1) constructivism (which views development as the progressive elaboration of increasingly complex structures), (2) cognitive neuroscience (which aims to understand the neural mechanisms underlying behavior), and (3) computational modeling (which proposes formal and explicit specifications of information processing). The guiding principle of our approach is context dependence, within and (in contrast to Marr [1982]) between levels of organization. We propose that three (...)
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  • Objects and attention: the state of the art.Brian J. Scholl - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):1-46.
  • Counting and the ontogenetic origins of exact equality.Rose M. Schneider, Erik Brockbank, Roman Feiman & David Barner - 2022 - Cognition 218 (C):104952.
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  • Object individuation using property/kind information in rhesus macaques.Laurie R. Santos, Gregory M. Sulkowski, Geertrui M. Spaepen & Marc D. Hauser - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):241-264.
  • El pensamiento incorporado percepcional-lingüístico-lógico/The embodied, perceptional, linguistic and logic thougth.Rómulo Sanmartin - 2012 - Sophia. Colección de Filosofía de la Educación 13:26-72.
    El pensamiento es incorporado por la articulación de los dos algoritmos: la estructura interna para conocer y la realidad, externa, a ser reconocida. La realidad interna está dada desde la estructura de la lengua, la cual más adelante dará lugar a un formato lógica-matemática. La realidad externa, que es también antropológica, está mediada por las áreas somatosensoriales cerebrales, que protológicamente acercan a lo distinto del humano. La filosofía y la ciencia tienen la tarea de acercarse a estas realidades para enhebrarlas, (...)
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  • The best game in town: The reemergence of the language-of-thought hypothesis across the cognitive sciences.Jake Quilty-Dunn, Nicolas Porot & Eric Mandelbaum - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e261.
    Mental representations remain the central posits of psychology after many decades of scrutiny. However, there is no consensus about the representational format(s) of biological cognition. This paper provides a survey of evidence from computational cognitive psychology, perceptual psychology, developmental psychology, comparative psychology, and social psychology, and concludes that one type of format that routinely crops up is the language-of-thought (LoT). We outline six core properties of LoTs: (i) discrete constituents; (ii) role-filler independence; (iii) predicate–argument structure; (iv) logical operators; (v) inferential (...)
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  • Situating vision in the world.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):197-207.
  • Visual indexes, preconceptual objects, and situated vision.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):127-158.
    This paper argues that a theory of situated vision, suited for the dual purposes of object recognition and the control of action, will have to provide something more than a system that constructs a conceptual representation from visual stimuli: it will also need to provide a special kind of direct (preconceptual, unmediated) connection between elements of a visual representation and certain elements in the world. Like natural language demonstratives (such as `this' or `that') this direct connection allows entities to be (...)
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  • Conceiving of entities as objects and as stuff.Sandeep Prasada, Krag Ferenz & Todd Haskell - 2002 - Cognition 83 (2):141-165.
  • Evidence for kind representations in the absence of language: Experiments with rhesus monkeys.Webb Phillips & Laurie R. Santos - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):455-463.
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  • Object Perception: Vision and Audition.Casey O’Callaghan - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):803-829.
    Vision has been the primary focus of naturalistic philosophical research concerning perception and perceptual experience. Guided by visual experience and vision science, many philosophers have focused upon theoretical issues dealing with the perception of objects. Recently, however, hearing researchers have discussed auditory objects. I present the case for object perception in vision, and argue that an analog of object perception occurs in auditory perception. I propose a notion of an auditory object that is stronger than just that of an intentional (...)
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  • Infants' use of featural and experiential information in segregating and individuating objects: a reply to Xu, Carey and Welch.Amy Needham & Renée Baillargeon - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):255-284.
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  • Infants' use of featural and experiential information in segregating and individuating objects: a reply to Xu, Carey and Welch.Amy Needham & Renée Baillargeon - 2000 - Cognition 74 (3):255-284.
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  • The relationship between object Files and conscious perception.Stephen R. Mitroff, Brian J. Scholl & Karen Wynn - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):67-92.
    Object files (OFs) are hypothesized mid-level representations which mediate our conscious perception of persisting objects—e.g. telling us ‘which went where’. Despite the appeal of the OF framework, not previous research has directly explored whether OFs do indeed correspond to conscious percepts. Here we present at least one case wherein conscious percepts of ‘which went where’ in dynamic ambiguous displays diverge from the analogous correspondence computed by the OF system. Observers viewed a ‘bouncing/streaming’ display in which two identical objects moved such (...)
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  • Multiple object individuation and subitizing in enumeration: a view from electrophysiology.Veronica Mazza & Alfonso Caramazza - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • The “what” and “where” of object representations in infancy.Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson - 2003 - Cognition 88 (3):259-276.
  • The Small Number System.Eric Margolis - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (1):113-134.
    I argue that the human mind includes an innate domain-specific system for representing precise small numerical quantities. This theory contrasts with object-tracking theories and with domain-general theories that only make use of mental models. I argue that there is a good amount of evidence for innate representations of small numerical quantities and that such a domain-specific system has explanatory advantages when infants’ poor working memory is taken into account. I also show that the mental models approach requires previously unnoticed domain-specific (...)
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  • How to Learn the Natural Numbers: Inductive Inference and the Acquisition of Number Concepts.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):924-939.
    Theories of number concepts often suppose that the natural numbers are acquired as children learn to count and as they draw an induction based on their interpretation of the first few count words. In a bold critique of this general approach, Rips, Asmuth, Bloomfield [Rips, L., Asmuth, J. & Bloomfield, A.. Giving the boot to the bootstrap: How not to learn the natural numbers. Cognition, 101, B51–B60.] argue that such an inductive inference is consistent with a representational system that clearly (...)
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  • Constructivist Set-Theoretic Analysis: An Alternative to Essentialist Social Science.James Mahoney - 2023 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 53 (4):327-366.
    Psychological essentialism is a cognitive bias through which human beings conceive the entities around them as having inner essences and basic natures. Social scientists routinely generate flawed inferences because their methods require the truth of psychological essentialism. This article develops set-theoretic analysis as a scientific-constructivist approach that overcomes the bias of psychological essentialism. With this approach, the “sets” of set-theoretic analysis are mental phenomena that establish boundaries and identify similarities and differences among entities whose natural kind composition is not known. (...)
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  • Right idea, wrong magnitude system.Stella F. Lourenco, Lauren S. Aulet, Vladislav Ayzenberg, Chi-Ngai Cheung & Kevin J. Holmes - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  • All Models Are Wrong, and Some Are Religious: Supernatural Explanations as Abstract and Useful Falsehoods about Complex Realities.Aaron D. Lightner & Edward H. Hagen - 2022 - Human Nature 33 (4):425-462.
    Many cognitive and evolutionary theories of religion argue that supernatural explanations are byproducts of our cognitive adaptations. An influential argument states that our supernatural explanations result from a tendency to generate anthropomorphic explanations, and that this tendency is a byproduct of an error management strategy because agents tend to be associated with especially high fitness costs. We propose instead that anthropomorphic and other supernatural explanations result as features of a broader toolkit of well-designed cognitive adaptations, which are designed for explaining (...)
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  • Number and natural language.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--216.
    One of the most important abilities we have as humans is the ability to think about number. In this chapter, we examine the question of whether there is an essential connection between language and number. We provide a careful examination of two prominent theories according to which concepts of the positive integers are dependent on language. The first of these claims that language creates the positive integers on the basis of an innate capacity to represent real numbers. The second claims (...)
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  • Spontaneous object and movement representations in 4-month-old human infants and albino Swiss mice.Alan Langus, Amanda Saksida, Daniela Braida, Roberta Martucci, Mariaelvina Sala & Marina Nespor - 2015 - Cognition 137 (C):63-71.
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  • Belief Files in Theory of Mind Reasoning.Ágnes Melinda Kovács - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (2):509-527.
    Humans seem to readily track their conspecifics’ mental states, such as their goals and beliefs from early infancy. However, the underlying cognitive architecture that enables such powerful abilities remains unclear. Here I will propose that a basic representational structure, the belief file, could provide the foundation for efficiently encoding, and updating information about, others’ beliefs in online social interactions. I will discuss the representational possibilities offered by the belief file and the ways in which the repertoire of mental state reasoning (...)
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  • Baby arithmetic: one object plus one tone.Tessei Kobayashi, Kazuo Hiraki, Ryoko Mugitani & Toshikazu Hasegawa - 2004 - Cognition 91 (2):B23-B34.
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  • A memory span of one? Object identification in 6.5-month-old infants.Zsuzsa Káldy & Alan M. Leslie - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):153-177.
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  • The early origins of goal attribution in infancy.Ildikó Király, Bianca Jovanovic, Wolfgang Prinz, Gisa Aschersleben & György Gergely - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):752-769.
    We contrast two positions concerning the initial domain of actions that infants interpret as goal-directed. The 'narrow scope' view holds that goal-attribution in 6- and 9-month-olds is restricted to highly familiar actions (such as grasping) (). The cue-based approach of the infant's 'teleological stance' (), however, predicts that if the cues of equifinal variation of action and a salient action effect are present, young infants can attribute goals to a 'wide scope' of entities including unfamiliar human actions and actions of (...)
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  • Codes and their vicissitudes.Bernhard Hommel, Jochen Müsseler, Gisa Aschersleben & Wolfgang Prinz - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):910-926.
    First, we discuss issues raised with respect to the Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s scope, that is, its limitations and possible extensions. Then, we address the issue of specificity, that is, the widespread concern that TEC is too unspecified and, therefore, too vague in a number of important respects. Finally, we elaborate on our views about TEC's relations to other important frameworks and approaches in the field like stages models, ecological approaches, and the two-visual-pathways model. Footnotes1 We acknowledge the precedence (...)
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  • Why Not Just Features? Reconsidering Infants’ Behavior in Individuation Tasks.Frauke Hildebrandt, Jan Lonnemann & Ramiro Glauer - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
  • Meeting Hedda Gabler.James R. Hamilton - 2012 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 262 (4):493-517.
    A key epistemic puzzle about theatrical performances of fictional narratives has to do with how spectators pick out and recognize the characters they encounter. An adequate solution to the puzzle is constrained by several factors : it should be similar to what we need to say about picking out and recognition of characters in non-fictional narratives ; it should be similar to what we need to say about picking out and recognizing elements in non-narrative performances ; it be it must (...)
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  • Sortals, bodies, and variables. A critique of Quine’s theory of reference.Ramiro Glauer & Frauke Hildebrandt - 2022 - Synthese 200 (4):1-21.
    Among the philosophical accounts of reference, Quine’s The Roots of Reference stands out in offering an integrated account of the acquisition of linguistic reference and object individuation. Based on a non-referential ability to distinguish bodies, the acquisition of sortals and quantification are crucial steps in learning to refer to objects. In this article, we critically re-assess Quine’s account of reference. Our critique will proceed in three steps with the aim of showing that Quine effectively presupposes what he sets out to (...)
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  • Communicative Function Demonstration induces kind-based artifact representation in preverbal infants.Judit Futó, Ernő Téglás, Gergely Csibra & György Gergely - 2010 - Cognition 117 (1):1-8.
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  • The work of Peirce’s Dicisign in representationalizing early deictic events.Donna E. West - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (225):19-38.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2018 Heft: 225 Seiten: 19-38.
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  • Visual Reference and Iconic Content.Santiago Echeverri - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (4):761-781.
    Evidence from cognitive science supports the claim that humans and other animals see the world as divided into objects. Although this claim is widely accepted, it remains unclear whether the mechanisms of visual reference have representational content or are directly instantiated in the functional architecture. I put forward a version of the former approach that construes object files as icons for objects. This view is consistent with the evidence that motivates the architectural account, can respond to the key arguments against (...)
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