Switch to: References

Citations of:

Blackwell (1985)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Clusters: On the structure of lexical concepts.Agustín Vicente - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (1):79-106.
    The paper argues for a decompositionalist account of lexical concepts. In particular, it presents and argues for a cluster decompositionalism, a view that claims that the complexes a token of a word corresponds to on a given occasion are typically built out of a determinate set of basic concepts, most of which are present on most other occasions of use of the word. The first part of the paper discusses some explanatory virtues of decompositionalism in general. The second singles out (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Donald Davidson: Looking Back, Looking Forward.Claudine Verheggen - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (2):7-28.
    The papers collected in this issue were solicited to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of Donald Davidson’s birth. Four of them discuss the implications of Davidson’s views—in particular, his later views on triangulation—for questions that are still very much at the centre of current debates. These are, first, the question whether Saul Kripke’s doubts about meaning and rule-following can be answered without making concessions to the sceptic or to the quietist; second, the question whether a way can be found to answer (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Supervaluationism and Its Logics.Achille C. Varzi - 2007 - Mind 116 (463):633-676.
    What sort of logic do we get if we adopt a supervaluational semantics for vagueness? As it turns out, the answer depends crucially on how the standard notion of validity as truth preservation is recasted. There are several ways of doing that within a supervaluational framework, the main alternative being between “global” construals (e.g., an argument is valid iff it preserves truth-under-all-precisifications) and “local” construals (an argument is valid iff, under all precisifications, it preserves truth). The former alternative is by (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • Inconsistency without Contradiction.Achille C. Varzi - 1997 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (4):621-639.
    David Lewis has argued that impossible worlds are nonsense: if there were such worlds, one would have to distinguish between the truths about their contradictory goings-on and contradictory falsehoods about them; and this--Lewis argues--is preposterous. In this paper I examine a way of resisting this argument by giving up the assumption that ‘in so-and-so world’ is a restricting modifier which passes through the truth-functional connectives The outcome is a sort of subvaluational semantics which makes a contradiction ‘A & ~A’ false (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Meta-ontology.Peter Van Inwagen - 1998 - Erkenntnis 48 (2-3):233--50.
    Quine has called the question, ‘What is there?’ the “ontological question.” But if we call this question by that name, what name shall we use for the question, ‘What are we asking when we ask “What is there?”’? I shall call it ‘the meta-ontological question’. I shall call the attempt to answer the meta-ontological question ‘meta-ontology’ and any proposed answer to it ‘a meta-ontology’. In this essay, I shall briefly sketch a meta-ontology. The meta-ontology I shall present is broadly Quinean. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  • Language as a Way to Cognition.Pavlo Sodomora - 2018 - Sententiae 37 (2):159-164.
    The translator of the first Ukrainian version of Plato’s Cratylus (see above, p. ..) indicates the difficulties in translating the dialogue, emphasizing the external and internal aspects of those difficulties. The external aspect consists in the different etymology of Greek and Ukrainian words, and the internal one lays in the problem of choice between “Latinization” and “Ukrainization” of the translated text. The author made one of his translation principles to avoid excessive Latinization and justifies his decision.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Davidson, externalismo E ceticismo.Plínio Junqueira Smith - 2004 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 16 (18):57.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What is radical interpretation? Davidson, Fodor, and the naturalization of philosophy.Robert Sinclair - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):161-184.
    Jerry Fodor and Ernest Lepore have recently criticized Davidson's methodology of radical interpretation because of its apparent failure to reflect how actual interpretation is achieved. Responding to such complaints, Davidson claims that he is not interested in the empirical issues surrounding actual interpretation but instead focuses on the question of what conditions make interpretation possible. It is argued that this exchange between Fodor and Lepore on one side, and Davidson on the other, cannot be viewed simply as a naturalist reaction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Subject and object in the contents of visual experience.Susanna Siegel - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (3):355--88.
    In this paper, I argue that certain perceptual relations are represented in visual experience.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Truth and Scientific Change.Gila Sher - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (3):371-394.
    The paper seeks to answer two new questions about truth and scientific change: What lessons does the phenomenon of scientific change teach us about the nature of truth? What light do recent developments in the theory of truth, incorporating these lessons, throw on problems arising from the prevalence of scientific change, specifically, the problem of pessimistic meta-induction?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Expression for expressivists.Mark Schroeder - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):86–116.
    Expressivism’s central idea is that normative sentences bear the same relation to non-cognitive attitudes that ordinary descriptive sentences bear to beliefs: the expression relation. Allan Gibbard teIls us that “that words express judgments will be accepted by almost everyone” - the distinctive contribution of expressivism, his claim goes, is only a view about what kind of judgments words express. But not every account of the expression relation is equally suitable for the expressivist’s purposes. In fact, what I argue in this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Does Mole’s Argument That Cognitive Processes Fail to Suffice for Attention Fail?Kranti Saran - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5:487-505.
    Is attention a cognitive process? I reconstruct and critically assess an argument first proposed by Christopher Mole that it cannot be so. Mole’s argument is influential because it creates theoretical space for a unifying analysis of attention at the subject level (though it does not entail it). Prominent philosophers working on attention such as Wayne Wu and Philipp Koralus explicitly endorse it, while Sebastian Watzl endorses a related version, this despite their differing theoretical commitments. I show that Mole’s argument is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Conventional Wisdom.P. Rysiew - 2000 - Analysis 60 (1):74-83.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Review of Christopher Gauker's Words without Meaning. [REVIEW]Michael Rescorla - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):121-124.
  • What did you mean by that? Misunderstanding, negotiation, and syntactic semantics.William J. Rapaport - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (3):397-427.
    Syntactic semantics is a holistic, conceptual-role-semantic theory of how computers can think. But Fodor and Lepore have mounted a sustained attack on holistic semantic theories. However, their major problem with holism (that, if holism is true, then no two people can understand each other) can be fixed by means of negotiating meanings. Syntactic semantics and Fodor and Lepore’s objections to holism are outlined; the nature of communication, miscommunication, and negotiation is discussed; Bruner’s ideas about the negotiation of meaning are explored; (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Communicating with Slurs.Jesse Rappaport - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (277):795-816.
    An adequate linguistic theory of slurs must address three major aspects of their meaning: descriptive, evaluative and expressive. Slurs denote specific groups, they are used to convey speakers’ evaluative attitudes, and some have a very strong emotional impact. In this paper, I argue that a variety of mechanisms are required to account for this range of properties. Semantically, slurs simply denote the groups that they target. Pragmatically, speakers use slurs to show, in the Relevance-Theoretic sense, that they share a negative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Kim on Causation and Mental Causation.Panu Raatikainen - 2018 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 25 (2):22–47.
    Jaegwon Kim’s views on mental causation and the exclusion argument are evaluated systematically. Particular attention is paid to different theories of causation. It is argued that the exclusion argument and its premises do not cohere well with any systematic view of causation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • La ontología tras bastidores. Un problema metafísico para el naturalismo genético.Miguel Ángel Pérez Jiménez - 2016 - Universitas Philosophica 33 (66):61-76.
    This paper criticizes genetic naturalism, namely, the task of explaining how reason emerges from nature. We take into account Donald Davidson’s anomalous monism and his analogy of triangulation. Our aim is to criticize both the metaphysical suppositions of anomalous monism and its consequences for genetic naturalism. We propose that those suppositions and those consequences prevent the genetic question to be appropriately raised and, therefore, mislead the research for a reasonable answer to that.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The cognitivist account of meaning and the liar paradox.Mark Pinder - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1221-1242.
    A number of theorists hold that literal, linguistic meaning is determined by the cognitive mechanism that underpins semantic competence. Borg and Larson and Segal defend a version of the view on which semantic competence is underpinned by the cognition of a truth-conditional semantic theory—a semantic theory which is true. Let us call this view the “cognitivist account of meaning”. In this paper, I discuss a surprisingly serious difficulty that the cognitivist account of meaning faces in light of the liar paradox. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Naming, Saying, and Structure.Bryan Pickel - 2017 - Noûs 51 (3):594-616.
    It is commonplace for philosophers to distinguish mere truths from truths that perspicuously represent the world's structure. According to a popular view, the perspicuous truths are supposed to be metaphysically revelatory and to play an important role in the accounts of law-hood, confirmation, and linguistic interpretation. Yet, there is no consensus about how to characterize this distinction. I examine strategies developed by Lewis and by Sider in his Writing the Book of the World which purport to explain this distinction in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Denying knowledge.Esben Nedenskov Petersen - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):36-55.
    Intuitions about contextualist cases such as Cohen’s airport case pose a problem for classical anti-skeptical versions of invariantism. Recently, Tim Black, Jessica Brown, and Patrick Rysiew have argued that the classical invariantist can respond by arguing that pragmatic aspects of epistemic discourse are responsible for the relevant problematic intuitions. This paper identifies the mechanisms of conversational implicature and impliciture as the basic sources of hope for this explanatory strategy. It then argues that neither of these sources provides the classical invariantist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Defining and defending social holism.Philip Pettit - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (3):169 – 184.
    This paper offers a definition of social holism that makes the doctrine non-trivial but possibly true. According to that definition, the social holist maintains that people depend non-causally on interaction with one another for possession of the capacity to think; the thesis is meant to be a contingent truth but one, like physicalism, that is plausible in the light of some a priori argument and some plausible empirical assumptions. The paper also sketches an argument in support of social holism, which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Keeping track of individuals: Brandom's analysis of Kripke's puzzle and the content of belief.Carlo Penco - 2005 - Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (1):177-201.
    This paper gives attention to a special point in Brandom.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Distinguishing WV Quine and Donald Davidson.James Pearson - 2011 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 1 (1):1-22.
    Given W.V. Quine’s and Donald Davidson’s extensive agreement about much of the philosophy of language and mind, and the obvious methodological parallels between Quine’s radical translation and Davidson’s radical interpretation, many—including Quine and Davidson—are puzzled by their occasional disagreements. I argue for the importance of attending to these disagreements, not just because doing so deepens our understanding of these influential thinkers, but because they are in fact the shadows thrown from two distinct conceptions of philosophical inquiry: Quine’s “naturalism” and what (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Skepticism and Internalism.Halvor Nordby - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):35-54.
    The skeptical Dream argument appeals to the possibility of dreaming. The skeptic holds that states of being awake are subjectively indistinguishable from possible dream states and that this means that we do not know that we are awake. This, the skeptic then claims, means that we have to accept that we do not have external world knowledge.It is natural to assume that there must be a connection between the Dream argument and epistemic internalism, the view that a belief is justified (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Pragmatics of Counterfactuals.Sarah Moss - 2012 - Noûs 46 (3):561-586.
    Recently, von Fintel (2001) and Gillies (2007) have argued that certain sequences of counterfactuals, namely reverse Sobel sequences, should motivate us to abandon standard truth conditional theories of counterfactuals for dynamic semantic theories. I argue that we can give a pragmatic account of our judgments about counterfactuals without giving up the standard semantics. In particular, I introduce a pragmatic principle governing assertability, and I use this principle to explain a variety of subtle data concerning reverse Sobel sequences.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • Facts, Values, and Norms.David Merli - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):105-107.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Are Dispositions Causally Relevant?Jennifer Mckitrick - 2005 - Synthese 144 (3):357-371.
    To determine whether dispositions are causally relevant, we have to get clear about what causal relevance is. Several characteristics of causal relevance have been suggested, including Explanatory Power, Counterfactual Dependence, Lawfullness, Exclusion, Independence, and Minimal Sufficiency. Different accounts will yield different answers about the causal relevance of dispositions. However, accounts of causal relevance that are the most plausible, for independent reasons, render the verdict that dispositions are causally relevant.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • What is conceptual glue?Eric Margolis - 1999 - Minds and Machines 9 (2):241-255.
    Conceptual structures are commonly likened to scientific theories, yet the content and motivation of the theory analogy are rarely discussed. Gregory Murphy and Douglas Medin's The Role of Theories in Conceptual Coherence is a notable exception and has become an authoritative exposition of the utility of the theory analogy. For Murphy and Medin, the theory analogy solves what they call the problem of conceptual coherence or the problem of conceptual glue. I argue that they conflate a number of issues under (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Kim’s Principle of Explanatory Exclusion.Ausonio Marras - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (3):439-451.
  • A Plea against Monsters.Emar Maier - 2016 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 93 (3):363-395.
    Inspired by Schlenker's (2003) seminal 'Plea for Monsters', linguists have been analyzing every occurrence of a shifted indexical by postulating a monstrous operator. My aim in this paper is to show that Kaplan's (1989) original strategy of explaining apparent shifting in terms of a quotational use/mention distinction offers a much more intuitive, parsimonious and empirically superior analysis of many of these phenomena, including direct--indirect switches in Ancient Greek, role shift in signed languages, free indirect discourse in literary narratives, and mixed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • McDowell, scepticism, and the 'veil of perception'.David Macarthur - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):175-190.
    McDowell has argued that external world scepticism is a pressing problem only in so far as we accept, on the basis of the argument from illusion, the claim that perceiving that p and hallucinating that p involve a highest common factor.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Predication as Ascription.David Liebesman - 2015 - Mind 124 (494):517-569.
    I articulate and defend a necessary and sufficient condition for predication. The condition is that a term or term-occurrence stands in the relation of ascription to its designatum, ascription being a fundamental semantic relation that differs from reference. This view has dramatically different semantic consequences from its alternatives. After outlining the alternatives, I draw out these consequences and show how they favour the ascription view. I then develop the view and elicit a number of its virtues.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • What model theoretic semantics cannot do?Ernest Lepore - 1983 - Synthese 54 (2):167 - 187.
  • The Heresy of Paraphrase: When the Medium Really Is the Message.Ernie Lepore - 2009 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):177-197.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • III*—Conditions on Understanding Language1.Ernest Lepore - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (1):41-60.
    Ernest Lepore; III*—Conditions on Understanding Language1, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 97, Issue 1, 1 June 1997, Pages 41–60, https://doi.or.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Brandom Beleaguered.Jerry Fodor & Ernie Lepore - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (3):677-691.
    We take it that Brandom’s sense of the geography is that our way of proceeding is more or less the first and his is more or less the second. But we think this way of describing the situation is both unclear and misleading, and we want to have this out right at the start. Our problem is that we don’t know what “you start with” means either in formulations like “you start with the content of words and proceed to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism.James Kreines - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):112-115.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Knowledge, Pragmatics, and Error.Dirk Kindermann - 2016 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 93 (3):429-57.
    ‘Know-that’, like so many natural language expressions, exhibits patterns of use that provide evidence for its context-sensitivity. A popular family of views – call it prag- matic invariantism – attempts to explain the shifty patterns by appeal to a pragmatic thesis: while the semantic meaning of ‘know-that’ is stable across all contexts of use, sentences of the form ‘S knows [doesn’t know] that p’ can be used to communicate a pragmatic content that depends on the context of use. In this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Truth, Meaning, and Interpretation: A Reconsideration of Davidson’s Program.Arpy Khatchirian - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (9).
    On a common reading of Davidson, the motivation for his proposal that a meaning theory is to take the form of a truth theory is at least partly guided by concern with the ends and means of interpretation. At the same time, the consensus seems to be that this proposal faces a particularly stubborn justificatory burden. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to suggest that there is a promising route to discharging this burden, albeit one that is visible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two concepts of concept.Muhammad ali KhAlidi - 1995 - Mind and Language 10 (4):402-22.
    Two main theories of concepts have emerged in the recent psychological literature: the Prototype Theory (which considers concepts to be self-contained lists of features) and the Theory Theory (which conceives of them as being embedded within larger theoretical networks). Experiments supporting the first theory usually differ substantially from those supporting the second, which suggests that these the· ories may be operating at different levels of explanation and dealing with different entities. A convergence is proposed between the Theory Theory and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Putting Brandom on His Feet: A Realist Interpretation of Inferentialism.Peter Kügler - 2014 - Contemporary Pragmatism 11 (2):79-93.
  • Epiphenomenalism and content.Mark Eli Kalderon - 1987 - Philosophical Studies 52 (1):71-90.
  • Color pluralism.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (4):563-601.
    Colors are sensible qualities. They are qualities that objects are perceived to have. Thus, when Norm, a normal perceiver, perceives a blue bead, the bead is perceived have a certain quality, perceived blueness. `Quality', here, is no mere synonym for property; rather, a quality is a kind of property a qualitative, as opposed to quan• titative, property. (The quantitative is a way of contrasting with the qualitative perhaps not the only way.).
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  • From impossible words to conceptual structure: The role of structure and processes in the lexicon.Kent Johnson - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (3):334-358.
    The structure of words is often thought to provide important evidence regarding the structure of concepts. At the same time, most contemporary linguists posit a great deal of structure in words. Such a trend makes some atomists about concepts uncomfortable. The details of linguistic methodology undermine several strategies for avoiding positing structure in words. I conclude by arguing that there is insufficient evidence to hold that word-structure bears any interesting relation to the structure of concepts.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • An Overview of Lexical Semantics.Kent Johnson - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (1):119-134.
    This article reviews some linguistic and philosophical work in lexical semantics. In Section 1, the general methods of lexical semantics are explored, with particular attention to how semantic features of verbs are associated with grammatical patterns. In Section 2, philosophical consequences and issues arising from this sort of research is reviewed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Descriptive Atomism and Foundational Holism: Semantics between the Old Testament and the New.Henry Jackman - 2005 - ProtoSociology 21:5-19.
    While holism and atomism are often treated as mutually exclusive approaches to semantic theory, the apparent tension between the two usually results from running together distinct levels of semantic explanation. In particular, there is no reason why one can’t combine an atomistic conception of what the semantic values of our words are (one’s “descriptive semantics”), with a holistic explanation of why they have those values (one’s “foundational semantics”). Most objections to holism can be shown to apply only to holistic version (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Emergentism and supervenience physicalism.Robert J. Howell - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):83 – 98.
    A purely metaphysical formulation of physicalism is surprisingly elusive. One popular slogan is, 'There is nothing over and above the physical'. Problems with this arise on two fronts. First, it is difficult to explain what makes a property 'physical' without appealing to the methodology of physics or to particular ways in which properties are known. This obviously introduces epistemic features into the core of a metaphysical issue. Second, it is difficult to cash out 'over-and-aboveness' in a way that is rigorous, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Radical interpretation and decision theory.Anandi Hattiangadi & H. Orri Stefánsson - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):6473-6494.
    This paper takes issue with an influential interpretationist argument for physicalism about intentionality based on the possibility of radical interpretation. The interpretationist defends the physicalist thesis that the intentional truths supervene on the physical truths by arguing that it is possible for a radical interpreter, who knows all of the physical truths, to work out the intentional truths about what an arbitrary agent believes, desires, and means without recourse to any further empirical information. One of the most compelling arguments for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The boundaries of context and their significance.Guichun Guo - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):449-460.
    In the study of contextualism, the most noticeable and at the same time ambiguous problem is how to ascertain the boundaries of context. This article tries to explore the boundaries of context and the significance of the contextualizing movement which began in the 1980s. The establishment of boundaries can be analyzed from three aspects: the syntactic boundary, the semantic boundary, and the pragmatic boundary. This differentiation offers meaningful perspectives for grasping the method of contextual analysis, strengthening its position and influence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark