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  1. Consciousness is the Concomitance of Life.Rajakishore Nath & Sunkanna Velpula - 2019 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 36 (1):167-181.
    The mystery of consciousness is among the most important questions pondered upon, not only in philosophy but also in the cognitive science, psychology, neurobiology and other sciences. The problem of consciousness has been traditionally dealt by philosophy, but its importance in explaining mental phenomena has made it a subject matter for other sciences that emerged later. Each philosopher and scientist has followed his own method in defining it, and arriving at a universal agreement on its definition has become difficult. In (...)
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  • The Neurology of Consciousness: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropathology Edited by Steven Laureys and Giulio Tononi.Edward F. Kelly - 2012 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 26 (3).
    This information-packed volume, without doubt a landmark event in the developing neuroscientific study of consciousness, deserves the attention of anyone interested in this subject. It is a sequel and companion to an earlier collection, The Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology, also edited by Steven Laureys, which contains the proceedings of a 2004 conference sponsored by the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness. Published initially as a special issue of Progress in Brain Research, Boundaries has been reissued in paperback (...)
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  • Phenomenology as a Toolbox for Cognitive Science.Lars Schwabe & Olaf Blanke - 2008 - Abstracta 4 (3):71-85.
     
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  • The Argument From Brain Damage Vindicated.Rocco J. Gennaro & Yonatan I. Fishman - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 105-133.
    It has long been known that brain damage has important negative effects on one’s mental life and even eliminates one’s ability to have certain conscious experiences. It thus stands to reason that when all of one’s brain activity ceases upon death, consciousness is no longer possible and so neither is an afterlife. It seems clear that human consciousness is dependent upon functioning brains. This essay reviews some of the overall neurological evidence from brain damage studies and concludes that our argument (...)
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