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Scientism in Chinese Thought, 1900-1950

New York: Biblo & Tannen (1965)

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  1. Views From the Chalkface.Zhi Hong Wan & Siu Ling Wong - 2016 - Science & Education 25 (9-10):1089-1114.
    Although the goal of developing school students’ understanding of nature of science has long been advocated, there is still a lack of research that focuses on probing how science teachers, a kind of major stakeholder in NOS instruction, perceive the values of teaching NOS. Through semi-structured interviews, this study investigated the views of 15 Hong Kong in-service senior secondary science teachers about the values of teaching NOS. These values as perceived by the teachers fall into two types. The first type (...)
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  • Ai Ssu-ch'I: The Apostle of Chinese Communism.Ignatius J. H. Ts'ao - 1972 - Studies in East European Thought 12 (1):2-36.
    Ai Ssu-ch'i is a little known but very important figure in the introduction of Marxism-Leninism into China. This first article provides a brief biography of Ai Ssu-ch'i as well as a detailed account of his activities as teacher, author and propagandist. Among his other services to the cause of Marxism-Leninism in China, one has to stress Ai Ssu-ch'i's systematic opposition to Yeh Ch'ing and to the non-Communist interpretation of Dr. Sun Yat-sen's Three Principles of the People. (cf.SST 10 (1970), 138–166.).
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  • Ai Ssu-Ch'i: The Apostle of Chinese Communism. Part One: His Life and Works.Ignatius J. H. Ts'ao - 1972 - Studies in Soviet Thought 12 (1):2-36.
    Ai Ssu-ch'i is a little known but very important figure in the introduction of Marxism-Leninism into China. This first article provides a brief biography of Ai Ssu-ch'i as well as a detailed account of his activities as teacher, author and propagandist. Among his other services to the cause of Marxism-Leninism in China, one has to stress Ai Ssu-ch'i's systematic opposition to Yeh Ch'ing and to the non-Communist interpretation of Dr. Sun Yat-sen's 'Three Principles of the People'.
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  • Yinshun's Recovery of Shizhu Piposha Lun 十住毗婆沙論: A Madhyamaka-Based Pure Land Practice In Twentieth-Century Taiwan.Stefania Travagnin - 2013 - Contemporary Buddhism 14 (2):320-343.
    Yinshun is regarded as one of the eminent monks of twentieth-century Chinese Buddhism. In the mission of reinventing Chinese Buddhism Yinshun engaged particularly in the revival and restatement of Madhyamaka. His interpretation of Nāgārjuna's texts, the reassessment of the links between pre-Mahāyāna Buddhism and the Prajn˜āpāramitā tradition, and the critical analysis of the Chinese San-lun became the core of the new Mahāyāna that he planned for the twentieth-century China. Yinshun also adopted Madhyamaka criteria to reconsider the Mahāyāna schools that were (...)
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  • Confucian Democracy as Pragmatic Experiment: Uniting Love of Learning and Love of Antiquity.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (2):141 – 166.
    This paper argues for the pragmatic construction of Confucian democracy by showing that Chinese philosophers who wish to see Confucianism flourish again as a positive dimension of Chinese civilization need to approach it pragmatically and democratically, otherwise their love of the past is at the expense of something else Confucius held in equal esteem, love of learning. Chinese philosophers who desire democracy for China would do well to learn from the earlier failures of the iconoclastic Westernizers, and realize that a (...)
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  • Contemporary Neo-Confucianism: Its Background, Varieties, Emergence, and Significance.Shuxian) Liu - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (2):213-233.
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  • Habermas and the Chinese Discourse of Modernity.Shijun Tong - 2001 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (1):81-105.
  • Why is Confucianism Not a Religion? The Impact of Orientalism.Chen Na - 2016 - Zygon 51 (1):21-42.
    This study attempts to answer the question why Confucianism, the dominant “teaching” among the Three Teachings, is not a religion in contemporary China, unlike the other two “teachings,” Buddhism and Daoism. By examining this phenomenon in the social-historical context, this study finds its origin in Orientalism. The Orientalist conceptualization of religion became part of the New Culture discourse at the turn of the twentieth century. While China has undergone tremendous social changes over the past century, the old discourse remains.
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  • Naturalism, Scientism and the Independence of Epistemology.James Maffie - 1995 - Erkenntnis 43 (1):1 - 27.
    Naturalists seek continuity between epistemology and science. Critics argue this illegitimately expands science into epistemology and commits the fallacy of scientism. Must naturalists commit this fallacy? I defend a conception of naturalized epistemology which upholds the non-identity of epistemic ends, norms, and concepts with scientific evidential ends, norms, and concepts. I argue it enables naturalists to avoid three leading scientistic fallacies: dogmatism, one dimensionalism, and granting science an epistemic monopoly.
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  • The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences.Yuanlin Guo - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (9):1835-1844.