Switch to: References

Citations of:

Heidegger and Science

University Press of America (1985)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The phenomenality of the phenomenon: Heidegger on physics.Damiano Sacco - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (4):503-519.
    The essay explores the possibilities afforded by Heidegger’s thought for addressing the question of the reality of the phenomenon within the framework of the theory of quantum mechanics. Heidegger’s conception of the task of phenomenology is seen to provide a crucial axis along which the phenomenon of quantum physics can be connected both to its appearance in language and to the historical unfolding of the horizon that grounds the possibility of an encounter with the phenomenon itself. The determinations of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Towards a Refined Depiction of Nature of Science.Igal Galili - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (3-5):503-537.
    This study considers the short list of Nature of Science features frequently published and widely known in the science education discourse. It is argued that these features were oversimplified and a refinement of the claims may enrich or sometimes reverse them. The analysis shows the need to address the range of variation in each particular aspect of NOS and to illustrate these variations with actual events from the history of science in order to adequately present the subject. Another implication of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Achievements of the Hermeneutic-Phenomenological Approach to Natural Science A Comparison with Constructivist Sociology.Martin Eger - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):343-367.
    The hermeneutic-phenomenological approach to the natural sciences has a special interest in the interpretive phases of these sciences and in the circumstances, cognitive and social, that lead to divergent as well as convergent interpretations. It tries to ascertain the role of the hermeneutic circle in research; and to this end it has developed, over the past three decades or so, a number of adaptations of hermeneutic and phenomenological concepts to processes of experimentation and theory-making. The purpose of the present essay (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Science as Instrumental Reason: Heidegger, Habermas, Heisenberg. [REVIEW]Cathryn Carson - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):483-509.
    In modern continental thought, natural science is widely portrayed as an exclusively instrumental mode of reason. The breadth of this consensus has partly preempted the question of how it came to persuade. The process of persuasion, as it played out in Germany, can be explored by reconstructing the intellectual exchanges among three twentieth-century theorists of science, Heidegger, Habermas, and Werner Heisenberg. Taking an iconic Heisenberg as a kind of limiting case of “the scientist,” Heidegger and Habermas each found themselves driven (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Continental Philosophy of Science.Babette Babich - 2007 - In Constantin Boundas (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to the Twentieth Century Philosophies. Edinburgh. University of Edinburgh Press. pp. 545--558.
    Continental philosophies of science tend to exemplify holistic themes connecting order and contingency, questions and answers, writers and readers, speakers and hearers. Such philosophies of science also tend to feature a fundamental emphasis on the historical and cultural situatedness of discourse as significant; relevance of mutual attunement of speaker and hearer; necessity of pre-linguistic cognition based in human engagement with a common socio-cultural historical world; role of narrative and metaphor as explanatory; sustained emphasis on understanding questioning; truth seen as horizonal, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Finitude, Fallibilism and Education Towards Non-Dogmatism: Gadamer’s Hermeneutics in Science Education.Anniina Leiviskä - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):516-530.
    The philosophy of science has witnessed continuous controversy since the mid-twentieth century regarding the justification of science?s privileged position, and which has also reverberated in the philosophy of science education. This contribution brings to the discussion the viewpoint of Hans-Georg Gadamer?s philosophical hermeneutics. I suggest that by relating to the idea of the fallibility of knowledge, Gadamerian philosophy provides a compromise between the extreme positions in the aforementioned debate. Gadamerian hermeneutics also has implications for science education: from the Gadamerian perspective, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why a Hermeneutical Philosophy of the Natural Sciences?Patrick A. Heelan - 1997 - Man and World 30 (3):271-298.
    Why a hermeneutical philosophy of the natural sciences? It is necessary to address the philosophic crisis of realism vs relativism in the natural sciences. This crisis is seen as a part of the cultural crisis that Husserl and Heidegger identified and attributed to the hegemonic role of theoretical and calculative thought in Western societies. The role of theory is addressed using the hermeneutical circle to probe the origin of theoretic meaning in scientific cultural praxes. This is studied in Galileo's discovery (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  • The Implications for Science Education of Heidegger’s Philosophy of Science.Robert Shaw - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):546-570.
    Science teaching always engages a philosophy of science. This article introduces a modern philosophy of science and indicates its implications for science education. The hermeneutic philosophy of science is the tradition of Kant, Heidegger, and Heelan. Essential to this tradition are two concepts of truth, truth as correspondence and truth as disclosure. It is these concepts that enable access to science in and of itself. Modern science forces aspects of reality to reveal themselves to human beings in events of disclosure. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Getting Real with Rouse and Heidegger.Jeff Kochan - 2011 - Perspectives on Science 19 (1):81-115.
    Joseph Rouse has drawn from Heidegger’s early philosophy to develop what he calls a “practical hermeneutics of science.” With this, he has not only become an important player in the recent trend towards practice-based conceptualisations of science, he has also emerged as the predominant expositor of Heidegger’s philosophy of science. Yet, there are serious shortcomings in both Rouse’s theory of science and his interpretation of Heidegger. In the first instance, Rouse’s practical hermeneutics appears confused on the topic of realism. In (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Comparative Study on Vaastu Shastra and Heidegger's 'Building, Dwelling and Thinking'.Reena Patra - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (3):199 – 218.
    This article aims to correlate Vaastu Shastra, an ancient Indian theory of architecture, with Heidegger's 'Building, Dwelling and Thinking' as they explain architecture in relation to the world where we live and build. Design as an evolutionary learning process is fundamentally a hermeneutic. Interestingly, some of the basic principles of Vaastu Shastra are coincidently similar to the points made by later Heidegger. As such, the main concern is to explain how man is related to the building and the universe, i.e. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Science as Social Existence: Heidegger and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers.
    REVIEW (1): "Jeff Kochan’s book offers both an original reading of Martin Heidegger’s early writings on science and a powerful defense of the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) research program. Science as Social Existence weaves together a compelling argument for the thesis that SSK and Heidegger’s existential phenomenology should be thought of as mutually supporting research programs." (Julian Kiverstein, in Isis) ---- REVIEW (2): "I cannot in the space of this review do justice to the richness and range of Kochan's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Coming to Terms with Technoscience: The Heideggerian Way.Hub Zwart - 2020 - Human Studies 43 (3):385-408.
    Heidegger’s oeuvre contains a plethora of comments on contemporary science, or rather technoscience because, according to Heidegger, science is inherently technical. What insights can be derived from such comments for philosophers questioning technoscience as it is practiced today? Can Heidegger’s thoughts become a source of inspiration for contemporary scholars who are confronted with automated sequencing machines, magnetic resonance imaging machines and other technoscientific contrivances? This is closely related to the question of method, I will argue. Although Heidegger himself was notoriously (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • “ Un -Promethean” science and the future of humanity: Heidegger’s warning.Norman K. Swazo - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-27.
    The twentieth-century German philosopher Martin Heidegger distinguished “meditative” and “calculative” modes of thinking as a way of highlighting the problematique of modern technology and the limits of modern science. In doing so he also was prescient to recognize, in 1955, that the most significant danger to the future of humanity are developments in molecular biology and biotechnology, in contrast to the post-World War global threat of thermonuclear weapons. These insights are engaged here in view of recent discussion of the need (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Trish Galzebrook, Heidegger's Philosophy of Science.Vincenzo Crupi - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (1):133-139.
  • Heidegger’s Thinking on the “Same” of Science and Technology.Lin8 Ma & Jaap Van Brakel - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):19-43.
    In this article, we trace and elucidate Heidegger’s radical re-thinking on the relation between science and technology from about 1940 until 1976. A range of passages from the Gesamtausgabe seem to articulate a reversal of the primacy of science and technology in claiming that “Science is applied technology.” After delving into Heidegger’s reflection on the being of science and technology and their “coordination,” we show that such a claim is essentially grounded in Heidegger’s idea that “Science and technology are the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Heidegger y la noción de verdad en las ciencias ónticas: una reconstrucción de los sentidos de verdad que imperan en las ciencias de lo intramundano.Luciano Mascaró - 2017 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 70:165-180.
    A continuación nos proponemos investigar la filosofía heideggeriana de los años ‘20 para determinar el sentido de verdad que opera como trasfondo en las labores de las ciencias ónticas de lo intramundano. Nuestro recorrido nos mostrará cuatro sentidos fundamentales: La verdad como propiedad de los enunciados; como resultados y consecuencias; como concordancia de la predicción con el experimento, y como certeza. Concluiremos nuestro estudio con la discusión de la posibilidad de subsistencia de la verdad con anterioridad al despliegue de la (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Scope of Hermeneutics in Natural Science.Patrick A. Heelan - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):273-298.
    Hermeneutics, or interpretation, is concerned with the generation, transmission, and acceptance of meaning within the lifeworld, and was the original method of the human sciences stemming, from F. Schleiermacher and W. Dilthey. The `hermeneutic philosophy' refers mostly to Heidegger. This paper addresses natural science from the perspective of Heidegger's analysis of meaning and interpretation. Its purpose is to incorporate into the philosophy of science those aspects of historicality, culture, and tradition that are absent from the traditional analysis of theory and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations