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  1. Contract or Coincidence: George Herbert Mead and Adam Smith on Self and Society.Timothy M. Costelloe - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):81-109.
    Although a number of commentators have remarked upon the simi larities between aspects of George Herbert Mead's social psychology and Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, there has been no sys tematic attempt to document the connection. This article attempts to do precisely that. First, the legitimacy of the connection is established by showing the likelihood that Mead knew this particular work by Smith, and by bringing together the various treatments of the matter made by commentators. Since Mead himself does (...)
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  • A Theory of Instrumental and Existential Rational Decisions: Smith, Weber, Mauss, Tönnies After Martin Buber.Elias L. Khalil & Alain Marciano - 2021 - Theory and Decision 90 (1):147-169.
    This paper proffers a dialogical theory of decision-making: decision-makers are engaged in two modes of rational decisions, instrumental and existential. Instrumental rational decisions take place when the DM views the self externally to the objects, whether goods or animate beings. Existential rational decisions take place when the DM views the self in union with such objects. While the dialogical theory differs from Max Weber’s distinction between two kinds of rationality, it follows Martin Buber’s philosophical anthropology. The paper expounds the ramifications (...)
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  • El problema de Smith y la relación entre moral y economía.José Atilano Pena López & José Manuel Sánchez Santos - 2007 - Isegoría 36:81-103.
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  • Is the Adulation of the Rich-and-Powerful Derived From Benevolence? Adam Smith and the Distinction Between Aspiration and Interests.Elias L. Khalil - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (4):285-304.
    ABSTRACTWhat is the source of the adulation of the rich-and-powerful? It cannot be benevolence. But then what is the criterion that delineates adulation from benevolence? This paper argues that the criterion resides in the set of inputs of the utility function: Does the set includes only interests, i.e. bundles of goods and resources? If so, the product is benevolence. But if the set includes aspiration, i.e. the desire to attain some imagined higher station, the product is adulation. Relying on Smith's (...)
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  • A Few Good Companies: Rethinking Firms’ Responsibilities Toward Common Pool Resources.Patricia Gabaldon & Stefan Gröschl - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (3):579-588.
    While a significant body of literature has highlighted the moral obligations of companies regarding the sustainable use of common pool resources, business activities that contribute to the sustenance of common pool resources remain embryonic. Studies in this area have largely focused on environmental stimuli rather than on the complex motivational structures that drive or hinder businesses’ contributions to common pool resources. We explore the different motives and behaviors of businesses and their contributions to common pool resources, and propose four roles (...)
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  • The Fellow-Feeling Paradox: Hume, Smith and the Moral Order.Elias L. Khalil - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (4):653-678.
    Hume and Smith advance different answers to the question of whether sympathy can ever be the foundation of the moral order. They hold contradictory views of sympathy, called here ‘the Fellow-Feeling Paradox’. For Hume, fellow-feeling tends to reverberate in society, leading to the socialization of the individual and even mob (collective) psychology. Hence, sympathy cannot be the foundation of the moral order. In contrast, for Smith, fellow-feeling develops into critical judgment of the emotions/actions, leading to individual moral autonomy even self-command. (...)
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  • ‘Mere Inventions of the Imagination’: A Survey of Recent Literature on Adam Smith.Vivienne Brown - 1997 - Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):281-312.
    As late twentieth-century discourses of modernity and postmodernity invoke their Enlightenment heritage in a search for the origins of their present achievements and predicaments, Adam Smith's works are still seen as a canonic representative of that heritage. Smith has long been evoked as the ‘father’ of economics and the original proponent of laissez-faire capitalism, but the political changes in recent decades have reconstituted his iconic status. With the full range of Smith's published and unpublished writings and lectures now widely available, (...)
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  • The Context Problematic, Behavioral Economics and the Transactional View: An Introduction to 'John Dewey and Economic Theory'.Elias L. Khalil - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):107-130.
    Are there empirical anomalies upon which Dewey's theory of action sheds better light than existing neoclassical and heterodox approaches? This introduction answers in the affirmative. They are the set of anomalies highlighted by behavioral economics. These anomalies stress the centrality of context. Neoclassical theorists react to the 'context problematic' by claiming that context, after all, is part of either the constraint set or the preference set. Dewey and his collaborator, Bentley, called such standard rationality theories 'interactional.' On the other hand, (...)
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