Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Virtual Reality Not for “Being Someone” but for “Being in Someone Else’s Shoes”: Avoiding Misconceptions in Empathy Enhancement.Francisco Lara & Jon Rueda - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12:3674.
    Erick J. Ramirez, Miles Elliott and Per‑Erik Milam (2021) have recently claimed that using Virtual Reality (VR) as an educational nudge to promote empathy is unethical. These authors argue that the influence exerted on the participant through virtual simulation is based on the deception of making them believe that they are someone else when this is impossible. This makes the use of VR for empathy enhancement a manipulative strategy in itself. In this article, we show that Ramirez et al.’s ethical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • True Belief Belies False Belief: Recent Findings of Competence in Infants and Limitations in 5-Year-Olds, and Implications for Theory of Mind Development.Joseph A. Hedger & William V. Fabricius - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):429-447.
    False belief tasks have enjoyed a monopoly in the research on children?s development of a theory of mind. They have been granted this status because they promise to deliver an unambiguous assessment of children?s understanding of the representational nature of mental states. Their poor cousins, true belief tasks, have been relegated to occasional service as control tasks. That this is their only role has been due to the universal assumption that correct answers on true belief tasks are inherently ambiguous regarding (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Primacy of Social Over Visual Perspective-Taking.Henrike Moll & Derya Kadipasaoglu - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • The Psychology of Epistemic Judgment.Jennifer Nagel & Jessica Wright - forthcoming - In Sarah K. Robins, John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology, 2nd Edition.
    Human social intelligence includes a remarkable power to evaluate what people know and believe, and to assess the quality of well- or ill-formed beliefs. Epistemic evaluations emerge in a great variety of contexts, from moments of deliberate private reflection on tough theoretical questions, to casual social observations about what other people know and think. We seem to be able to draw systematic lines between knowledge and mere belief, to distinguish justified and unjustified beliefs, and to recognize some beliefs as delusional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Carruthers' Marvelous Magical Mindreading Machine.Charlie Lewis & Jeremy I. M. Carpendale - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):152-152.
    Carruthers presents an interesting analysis of confabulation and a clear attack on introspection. Yet his theory-based alternative is a mechanistic view of which neglects the fact that social understanding occurs within a network of social relationships. In particular, the role of language in his model is too simple.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of the Self in Mindblindness in Autism.Michael V. Lombardo & Simon Baron-Cohen - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):130-140.
    Since its inception the ‘mindblindness’ theory of autism has greatly furthered our understanding of the core social-communication impairments in autism spectrum conditions . However, one of the more subtle issues within the theory that needs to be elaborated is the role of the ‘self’. In this article, we expand on mindblindness in ASC by addressing topics related to the self and its central role in the social world and then review recent research in ASC that has yielded important insights by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension.Petra Hendriks - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Enhancing “Theory of Mind” Through Behavioral Synchrony.Adam Baimel, Rachel L. Severson, Andrew S. Baron & Susan A. J. Birch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Toward a Computational Psycholinguistics of Reference Production.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Roger P. G. van Gompel & Emiel Krahmer - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):166-183.
    This article introduces the topic ‘‘Production of Referring Expressions: Bridging the Gap between Computational and Empirical Approaches to Reference’’ of the journal Topics in Cognitive Science. We argue that computational and psycholinguistic approaches to reference production can benefit from closer interaction, and that this is likely to result in the construction of algorithms that differ markedly from the ones currently known in the computational literature. We focus particularly on determinism, the feature of existing algorithms that is perhaps most clearly at (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Pooling the Ground: Understanding and Coordination in Collective Sense Making.Joanna Rä…Czaszek-Leonardi, Agnieszka Dä™Bska & Adam Sochanowicz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Production of Referring Expressions for an Unknown Audience: A Computational Model of Communal Common Ground.Roman Kutlak, Kees van Deemter & Chris Mellish - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mindreading and Psycholinguistic Approaches to Perspective Taking: Establishing Common Ground.Ian Apperly - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):133-139.
    In this commentary on “Memory and Common Ground Processes in Language Use,” I draw attention to relevant work on mindreading. The concerns of research on common ground and mindreading have significant overlap, but these literatures have worked in relative isolation of each other. I attempt an assimilation, pointing out shared and distinctive concerns and mutually informative results.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Do Young Children Process Beliefs About Beliefs?: Evidence From Response Latency.Haruo Kikuno, Peter Mitchell & Fenja Ziegler - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (3):297–316.
    Are incorrect judgments on false belief tasks better explained within the framework of a conceptual change theory or a bias theory? Conceptual change theory posits a change in the form of reasoning from 3 to 4 years old while bias theory posits that processing factors are responsible for errors among younger children. The results from three experiments showed that children who failed a test of false belief took as long to respond as those who passed, and both groups of children (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • To Name or to Describe: Shared Knowledge Affects Referential Form.Daphna Heller, Kristen S. Gorman & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):290-305.
    The notion of common ground is important for the production of referring expressions: In order for a referring expression to be felicitous, it has to be based on shared information. But determining what information is shared and what information is privileged may require gathering information from multiple sources, and constantly coordinating and updating them, which might be computationally too intensive to affect the earliest moments of production. Previous work has found that speakers produce overinformative referring expressions, which include privileged names, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • How We Know Our Conscious Minds: Introspective Access to Conscious Thoughts.Keith Frankish - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):145-146.
    Carruthers considers and rejects a mixed position according to which we have interpretative access to unconscious thoughts, but introspective access to conscious ones. I argue that this is too hasty. Given a two-level view of the mind, we can, and should, accept the mixed position, and we can do so without positing additional introspective mechanisms beyond those Carruthers already recognizes.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Establishing Conventional Communication Systems: Is Common Knowledge Necessary?Dale J. Barr - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (6):937-962.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • Generation of Referring Expressions: Assessing the Incremental Algorithm.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Ielka van der Sluis & Richard Power - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):799-836.
    A substantial amount of recent work in natural language generation has focused on the generation of ‘‘one-shot’’ referring expressions whose only aim is to identify a target referent. Dale and Reiter's Incremental Algorithm (IA) is often thought to be the best algorithm for maximizing the similarity to referring expressions produced by people. We test this hypothesis by eliciting referring expressions from human subjects and computing the similarity between the expressions elicited and the ones generated by algorithms. It turns out that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Matched False-Belief Performance During Verbal and Nonverbal Interference.James Dungan & Rebecca Saxe - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (6):1148-1156.
    Language has been shown to play a key role in the development of a child’s theory of mind, but its role in adult belief reasoning remains unclear. One recent study used verbal and nonverbal interference during a false-belief task to show that accurate belief reasoning in adults necessarily requires language (Newton & de Villiers, 2007). The strength of this inference depends on the cognitive processes that are matched between the verbal and nonverbal inference tasks. Here, we matched the two interference (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • How to Construct a Minimal Theory of Mind.Stephen A. Butterfill & Ian A. Apperly - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (5):606-637.
    What could someone represent that would enable her to track, at least within limits, others' perceptions, knowledge states and beliefs including false beliefs? An obvious possibility is that she might represent these very attitudes as such. It is sometimes tacitly or explicitly assumed that this is the only possible answer. However, we argue that several recent discoveries in developmental, cognitive, and comparative psychology indicate the need for other, less obvious possibilities. Our aim is to meet this need by describing the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  • Pragmatics and Epistemic Vigilance: A Developmental Perspective.Diana Mazzarella & Nausicaa Pouscoulous - 2021 - Mind and Language 36 (3):355-376.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anchoring Utterances.Herbert H. Clark - 2021 - Topics in Cognitive Science 13 (2):329-350.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Generation of Referring Expressions: Assessing the Incremental Algorithm.Kees van Deemter, Albert Gatt, Ielka van der Sluis & Richard Power - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (5):799-836.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Epistemic Focal Bias.Mikkel Gerken - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):41 - 61.
    This paper defends strict invariantism against some philosophical and empirical data that have been taken to compromise it. The defence involves a combination of a priori philosophical arguments and empirically informed theorizing. The positive account of the data is an epistemic focal bias account that draws on cognitive psychology. It involves the assumption that, owing to limitations of the involved cognitive resources, intuitive judgments about knowledge ascriptions are generated by processing only a limited part of the available information?the part that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Pragmatics and Processing.Bart Geurts & Paula Rubio-Fernández - 2015 - Ratio 28 (4):446-469.
    Gricean pragmatics has often been criticised for being implausible from a psychological point of view. This line of criticism is never backed up by empirical evidence, but more importantly, it ignores the fact that Grice never meant to advance a processing theory, in the first place. Taking our lead from Marr, we distinguish between two levels of explanation: at the W-level, we are concerned with what agents do and why; at the H-level, we ask how agents do whatever it is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Memory and Common Ground Processes in Language Use.Sarah Brown‐Schmidt & Melissa C. Duff - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):722-736.
    During communication, we form assumptions about what our communication partners know and believe. Information that is mutually known between the discourse partners—their common ground—serves as a backdrop for successful communication. Here we present an introduction to the focus of this topic, which is the role of memory in common ground and language use. Two types of questions emerge as central to understanding the relationship between memory and common ground, specifically questions having to do with the representation of common ground in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Will the Real Empathy Please Stand Up? A Case for a Narrow Conceptualization.Amy Coplan - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):40-65.
    A longstanding problem with the study of empathy is the lack of a clear and agreed upon definition. A trend in the recent literature is to respond to this problem by advancing a broad and all-encompassing view of empathy that applies to myriad processes ranging from mimicry and imitation to high-level perspective taking. I argue that this response takes us in the wrong direction and that what we need in order to better understand empathy is a narrower conceptualization, not a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Producing Pronouns and Definite Noun Phrases: Do Speakers Use the Addressee’s Discourse Model?Kumiko Fukumura & Roger P. G. van Gompel - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1289-1311.
    We report two experiments that investigated the widely held assumption that speakers use the addressee’s discourse model when choosing referring expressions (e.g., Ariel, 1990; Chafe, 1994; Givón, 1983; Prince, 1985), by manipulating whether the addressee could hear the immediately preceding linguistic context. Experiment 1 showed that speakers increased pronoun use (and decreased noun phrase use) when the referent was mentioned in the immediately preceding sentence compared to when it was not, even though the addressee did not hear the preceding sentence, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Toward Integrative Dynamic Models for Adaptive Perspective Taking.Nicholas Duran, Rick Dale & Alexia Galati - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):761-779.
    In a matter of mere milliseconds, conversational partners can transform their expectations about the world in a way that accords with another person's perspective. At the same time, in similar situations, the exact opposite also appears to be true. Rather than being at odds, these findings suggest that there are multiple contextual and processing constraints that may guide when and how people consider perspective. These constraints are shaped by a host of factors, including the availability of social and environmental cues, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Alignment in Interactive Reference Production: Content Planning, Modifier Ordering, and Referential Overspecification.Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):269-289.
    Psycholinguistic studies often look at the production of referring expressions in interactive settings, but so far few referring expression generation algorithms have been developed that are sensitive to earlier references in an interaction. Rather, such algorithms tend to rely on domain-dependent preferences for both content selection and linguistic realization. We present three experiments showing that humans may opt for dispreferred attributes and dispreferred modifier orderings when these were primed in a preceding interaction (without speakers being consciously aware of this). In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • How to Construct a Minimal Theory of Mind.Ian A. Apperly Stephen A. Butterfill - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (5):606-637.
    What could someone represent that would enable her to track, at least within limits, others' perceptions, knowledge states and beliefs including false beliefs? An obvious possibility is that she might represent these very attitudes as such. It is sometimes tacitly or explicitly assumed that this is the only possible answer. However, we argue that several recent discoveries in developmental, cognitive, and comparative psychology indicate the need for other, less obvious possibilities. Our aim is to meet this need by describing the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • How Children and Adults Represent God's Mind.Larisa Heiphetz, Jonathan D. Lane, Adam Waytz & Liane L. Young - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):121-144.
    For centuries, humans have contemplated the minds of gods. Research on religious cognition is spread across sub-disciplines, making it difficult to gain a complete understanding of how people reason about gods' minds. We integrate approaches from cognitive, developmental, and social psychology and neuroscience to illuminate the origins of religious cognition. First, we show that although adults explicitly discriminate supernatural minds from human minds, their implicit responses reveal far less discrimination. Next, we demonstrate that children's religious cognition often matches adults' implicit (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Editorial: Social Cognition: Mindreading and Alternatives.Daniel D. Hutto, Mitchell Herschbach & Victoria Southgate - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):375-395.
    Human beings, even very young infants, and members of several other species, exhibit remarkable capacities for attending to and engaging with others. These basic capacities have been the subject of intense research in developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, comparative psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy of mind over the last several decades. Appropriately characterizing the exact level and nature of these abilities and what lies at their basis continues to prove a tricky business. The contributions to this special issue investigate whether and to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Is Egocentric Bias Evidence for Simulation Theory.Annika Wallin - 2011 - Synthese 178 (3):503-514.
    Revised simulation theory allows mental state attributions containing some or all of the attributor's genuine, non-simulated mental states. It is thought that this gives the revised theory an empirical advantage, because unlike theory theory and rationality theory, it can explain egocentric bias. I challenge this view, arguing that theory theory and rationality theory can explain egocentricity by appealing to heuristic mindreading and the diagnosticity of attributors' own beliefs, and that these explanations are as simple and consistent as those provided by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Shared Content as Speaker Meaning.Eleni Kriempardis - 2009 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 5 (2):161-190.
    Shared Content as Speaker Meaning Cappelen and Lepore have recently emphasised the significance of a minimal notion of perfectly shared content for pragmatic theories. This paper argues for a similar notion, but assumes that a satisfactory defence cannot be achieved along the lines of the existing debate between Minimalism and Contextualism. Rather, it is necessary to consistently distinguish two functional domains: the subjective processing domain and the interpersonal domain of communication, each with its own kind of utterance meaning. I will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Learning to Apply Theory of Mind.Rineke Verbrugge & Lisette Mol - 2008 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (4):489-511.
    In everyday life it is often important to have a mental model of the knowledge, beliefs, desires, and intentions of other people. Sometimes it is even useful to to have a correct model of their model of our own mental states: a second-order Theory of Mind. In order to investigate to what extent adults use and acquire complex skills and strategies in the domains of Theory of Mind and the related skill of natural language use, we conducted an experiment. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Children’s Application of Theory of Mind in Reasoning and Language.Liesbeth Flobbe, Rineke Verbrugge, Petra Hendriks & Irene Krämer - 2008 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (4):417-442.
    Many social situations require a mental model of the knowledge, beliefs, goals, and intentions of others: a Theory of Mind (ToM). If a person can reason about other people’s beliefs about his own beliefs or intentions, he is demonstrating second-order ToM reasoning. A standard task to test second-order ToM reasoning is the second-order false belief task. A different approach to investigating ToM reasoning is through its application in a strategic game. Another task that is believed to involve the application of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Under Pressure: Processing Representational Decoupling in False-Belief Tasks.Anna Ciaunica - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (4):527-542.
    Several studies demonstrated that children younger than 3 years of age, who consistently fail the standard verbal false-belief task, can anticipate others’ actions based on their attributed false beliefs. This gave rise to the so-called “Developmental Paradox”. De Bruin and Kästner recently suggested that the Developmental Paradox is best addressed in terms of the relation between coupled and decoupled processes and argued that if enactivism is to be a genuine alternative to classic cognitivism, it should be able to bridge the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Dissociation of Posture Remapping and Cognitive Load in Level-2 Perspective-Taking.Yei-Yu Yeh, Chi-Chin Wang, Shih-Kuen Cheng & Chui-De Chiu - 2021 - Cognition 214:104733.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Experimental Pragmatics: A Gricean Turn in the Study of Language.Ira A. Noveck & Anne Reboul - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):425-431.
  • The Division of Labor in Communication: Speakers Help Listeners Account for Asymmetries in Visual Perspective.Robert D. Hawkins, Hyowon Gweon & Noah D. Goodman - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (3):e12926.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mindreading in the Balance : Adults' Mediolateral Leaning and Anticipatory Looking Foretell Others' Action Preparation in a False-Belief Interactive Task.Giovanni Zani, Stephen A. Butterfill & Jason Low - 2020 - Royal Society Open Science 7.
    Anticipatory looking on mindreading tasks can indicate our expectation of an agent's action. The challenge is that social situations are often more complex, involving instances where we need to track an agent's false belief to successfully identify the outcome to which an action is directed. If motor processes can guide how action goals are understood, it is conceivable— where that kind of goal ascription occurs in false-belief tasks— for motor representations to account for someone's belief-like state. Testing adults in a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cultural Effect on Perspective Taking in Chinese–English Bilinguals.Kevin K. S. Luk, Wen S. Xiao & Him Cheung - 2012 - Cognition 124 (3):350-355.
    Some recent evidence has suggested that perspective taking skills in everyday life situations may differ across cultural groups. In the present study, we investigated this effect via culture priming in a group of Chinese-English bilingual adults in the context of a communication game. Results showed that the participants made more perspective taking errors when interpreting the game instruction under the Western than the Chinese primes. The findings suggest that the ability to assume others' mental states not only can be used (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Editorial: Models of Reference.Kees van Deemter, Emiel Krahmer, Albert Gatt & Roger P. G. van Gompel - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of Metarepresentation in the Production and Resolution of Referring Expressions.William S. Horton & Susan E. Brennan - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Understanding and Remediating Social-Cognitive Dysfunctions in Patients with Serious Mental Illness Using Relational Frame Theory.Annemieke L. Hendriks, Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ciara McEnteggart, Hubert R. A. De Mey, Gwenny T. L. Janssen & Jos I. M. Egger - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Secret of the Masters: Young Chess Players Show Advanced Visual Perspective Taking.Qiyang Gao, Wei Chen, Zhenlin Wang & Dan Lin - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visible Social Interactions Do Not Support the Development of False Belief Understanding in the Absence of Linguistic Input: Evidence From Deaf Adult Homesigners.Deanna L. Gagne & Marie Coppola - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • When the Theory of Mind Would Be Very Useful.Piergiorgio Battistelli & Alessandra Farneti - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Strategies of Deception: Under‐Informativity, Uninformativity, and Lies—Misleading With Different Kinds of Implicature.Michael Franke, Giulio Dulcinati & Nausicaa Pouscoulous - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (2):583-607.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Repair Avoidance: When Faithful Informational Exchanges Don't Matter That Much.Bruno Galantucci, Benjamin Langstein, Eliyahu Spivack & Nathaniel Paley - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (10).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark