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  1. ‘Recognizing’ Human Rights: an Argument for the Applicability of Recognition Theory Within the Sociology of Human Rights.Reiss Kruger - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (4):501-519.
    Beginning with Margaret Somers and Christopher Roberts’ review of the sociology of human rights and Bryan Turner and Malcolm Waters’ debate therein, the author presents some of the questions which have been so far been the focus of this sociological sub-discipline. This review raises the question of ‘rights’ as a subject of study, and the normative consequences therein. From here, the author introduces recognition theory as a potential participant in these discussions around human rights. The author traces recognition theory from (...)
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  • Juridification and Politics: From the Dilemma of Juridification to the Paradoxes of Rights.Daniel Loick - 2014 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (8):757-778.
    The article starts with the observation of an ambivalence inherent to the politics of juridification. On the one hand, some spheres of the life-world such as the family and the school are often places of exploitation, degradation and humiliation and therefore seem to require the implementation of legal protection for their members. At the same time, the demand for rights seems somehow to grasp too little, would be inadequate or even counterproductive. How can this ambivalence be politically dealt with? I (...)
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  • Good Guys with Guns: From Popular Sovereignty to Self-Defensive Subjectivity.Daniel Loick & Chad Kautzer - 2015 - Law and Critique 26 (2):173-187.
    Beliefs once limited to the extremes of the North American gun culture have become mainstream, while the US Supreme Court’s ruling in District of Columbia v. Heller and a spate of right-to-carry laws have contributed to the proliferation of guns in public life. These changes in political discourses, legislative agendas, and social practices are indicative of an emergent and pernicious form of subjectivity, which is here defined as self-defensive. Such subjectivity is characterized by a pathological identification with the right of (...)
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  • ‘Expression of Contempt’: Hegel’s Critique of Legal Freedom.Daniel Loick & Chad Kautzer - 2015 - Law and Critique 26 (2):189-206.
    In this paper, I argue for the existence of pathologies of juridicism. I attempt to show that the Western regime of right tends to colonize our intersubjective relations, resulting in the formation of affective and habitual dispositions that actually hinder participation in social life. Speaking of pathologies of juridicism is to claim that the legal form fundamentally contaminates the way in which we relate to ourselves, to others, and to the world, resulting in an ethically deformed, distorted or deficient form (...)
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