Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Aristotle's Empiricism.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle is famous for thinking that all our knowledge comes from perception. But it's not immediately clear what this view is meant to entail. It's not clear, for instance, what perception is supposed to contribute to the more advanced forms of knowledge that derive from it. Nor is it clear how we should understand the nature of its contribution—what it might mean to say that these more advanced forms of knowledge are "derived from" or "based on" what we perceive. Aristotle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Modes of Argumentation in Aristotle's Natural Science.Adam W. Woodcox - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Western Ontario
    Through a detailed analysis of the various modes of argumentation employed by Aristotle throughout his natural scientific works, I aim to contribute to the growing scholarship on the relation between Aristotle’s theory of science and his actual scientific practice. I challenge the standard reading of Aristotle as a methodological empiricist and show that he permits a variety of non-empirical arguments to support controversial theses in properly scientific contexts. Specifically, I examine his use of logical argumentation in the discussion of mule (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Immediacy in Aristotle’s Epistemology.Breno Zuppolini - 2021 - Phronesis 66 (2):111-138.
    This article discusses immediate premises in Aristotle’s epistemology. The traditional interpretation identifies immediacy with indemonstrability: immediate truths are the indemonstrable principles of science from which the theorems are derived by demonstration. Against this common reading, I argue that Aristotle’s recognition of two kinds of epistemic priority commits him to the existence of two types of immediacy, only one of which is equivalent to indemonstrability. As a result, my interpretation offers a better understanding of a puzzling passage that seems to contradict (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Relation Between Knowledge and Inquiry in the Phaedo.Vasilis Politis - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):51-73.
    What is the relation, in Plato, between the account of knowledge and the account of inquiry? Is the account of knowledge independent of the account of inquiry? These strike me as important, even pressing, questions. While so much work has been done on Plato’s account of knowledge, and quite a lot is being done on his account of inquiry, I know of only the odd critic who has considered the two together. It is remarkable that critics have generally treated of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark