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  1. Commercialization of Food Crops in Busoga, Uganda, and the Renegotiation of Gender.Pernille Sørensen - 1996 - Gender and Society 10 (5):608-628.
    This article describes the transformation of the agricultural economy that took place as a result of the disintegration of the state provision of marketing in Uganda in the 1970s and 1980s. In this context, the article examines how the commercialization of food crops is constructing new relations of gender within agricultural production. In the transformation caused by the commercialization of food crops, men appeared to have gained total control over food production, causing the gender relations to move from a complementary (...)
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  • Resisting Despair: Narratives of Disruption and Transformation Among White Working-Class Women in a Declining Coal-Mining Community.Jennifer M. Silva & Kait Smeraldo Schell - 2020 - Gender and Society 34 (5):736-759.
    In this article, we examine how white working-class women reimagine gender in the face of social and economic changes that have undermined their ability to perform normative femininity. As blue-collar jobs have disappeared, scholars have posited that white working-class men and women have become increasingly isolated, disconnected from institutions, and hopeless about the future, leading to a culture of despair. Although past literature has examined how working-class white men cope with the inability to perform masculinity through wage-earning and family authority, (...)
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  • Re-Understanding Religion and Support for Gender Equality in Arab Countries.Peer Scheepers, Niels Spierings & Saskia Glas - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (5):686-712.
    Much is said about Middle Eastern and North African publics opposing gender equality, often referring to patriarchal Islam. However, nuanced large-scale studies addressing which specific aspects of religiosity affect support for gender equality across the MENA are conspicuously absent. This study develops and tests a gendered agentic socialization framework that proposes that MENA citizens are not only passively socialized by religion but also have agency. This disaggregates the influence of religiosity, highlights its multifacetedness, and theorizes the moderating roles that gender (...)
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  • Grandmothers and Children’s Schooling in Sub-Saharan Africa.Sandor Schrijner & Jeroen Smits - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (1):65-89.
    Under poor circumstances, co-residence of a grandmother is generally considered to be beneficial for children. Empirical evidence does not unequivocally support this expectation and suggests that the grandmother’s importance depends on the family’s circumstances. We study the relationship between grandmother’s co-residence and children’s schooling in sub-Saharan Africa under a broad range of circumstances. Results make clear that the effect of a co-residing grandmother varies but is almost always positive. Grandmothers over age 60 are most effective in helping their children. They (...)
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  • Contradictory Consequences of Mandatory Conscription: The Case of Women Secretaries in the Israeli Military.Orna Sasson-Levy - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (4):481-507.
    This article examines the implications of mandatory conscription for women by studying the experience of women soldiers who serve as secretaries in the Israeli military. The author argues that the military service of the secretaries is shaped by three organizing principles: an employment principle of cheap labor, a matrimonial principle of the office wife, and a hierarchy principle that shapes the secretaries as status symbols. Employing the theory of gendered organizations, the author maintains that each one of these organizing principles (...)
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  • Religion and Everyday Consumption Ethics: A Moral Economy Approach.Ozlem Sandikci - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):277-293.
    As research on ethical consumers and consumption practices has continued to grow, a complimentary body of work concerned less with ethical consumption but more with ethics in consumption has emerged. Problematizing the divide between ethical and non-ethical consumption, this stream of research focuses on the domain of everyday and explores the moral struggles individuals face while engaging in ordinary consumption practices. However, the attention on the ordinary runs the risk of obscuring the contribution of the ‘extraordinary’ or the transcendental to (...)
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  • Immigrant Women and Domestic Violence: Common Experiences in Different Countries.Olivia Salcido & Cecilia Menjívar - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (6):898-920.
    In this article, the authors assess the still limited literature on domestic violence among immigrant women in major receiving countries so as to begin delineating a framework to explain how immigrant-specific factors exacerbate the already vulnerable position—as dictated by class, gender, and race—of immigrant women in domestic violence situations. First, a review of this scholarship shows that the incidence of domestic violence is not higher than it is in the native population but rather that the experiences of immigrant women in (...)
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  • Gender, Veiling, and Class: Symbolic Boundaries and Veiling in Bengali Muslim Families.M. D. Abdus Sabur - 2022 - Gender and Society 36 (3):397-421.
    In Bangladesh, due to economic growth and greater access to education, more girls and women are veiling, even as they are also more likely to be in school or employed. Some scholars identify this trend of women appearing both “more modern” and “more religious” as paradoxical. On the basis of 114 in-depth interviews with Bangladeshi migrant workers in Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Singapore, and South Korea and their wives in rural Bangladesh, I claim that Muslim women in middle-class Bengali families who (...)
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  • Postcolonial Feminism, The Politics of Identification, and the Liberal Bargain.Amalia Sa’ar - 2005 - Gender and Society 19 (5):680-700.
    The article focuses on the complex positioning of people from disempowered backgrounds with respect to liberalism and liberal dividends. The author offers the term liberal bargain, paraphrasing Deniz Kandiyoti’s “patriarchal bargain” and Cynthia Cockburn’s “ethnic bargain,” and dwells on the interconnections between the three. The liberal bargain indicates the particular consciousness and symbolic whitening that “colorized” people tend to adopt when they attempt to cash in on the liberal promise. Within the discourse of postcolonial feminism, the concept is intended to (...)
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  • “Why Marcia You've Changed!”: Male Clerical Temporary Workers Doing Masculinity in a Feminized Occupation.Jackie Krasas Rogers & Kevin D. Henson - 2001 - Gender and Society 15 (2):218-238.
    This research provides a look at men doing gender in the highly feminized context of temporary clerical employment. Male clerical temporaries, as with other men who cross over into “women's work,” face institutionalized challenges to their sense of masculinity. In particular, male clerical temporary workers face gender assessment—highlighting their failure to live up to the ideals of hegemonic masculinity. The resulting gender strategies these men adopt reveal how male clerical temporary workers “do masculinity”—often in a collaborative performance shaped by the (...)
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  • Pious and Critical: Muslim Women Activists and the Question of Agency.Rachel Rinaldo - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (6):824-846.
    Recent turmoil in the Middle East and North Africa has prompted renewed concerns about women’s rights in Muslim societies. It has also raised questions about women’s agency and activism in religious contexts. This article draws on ethnographic research with women activists in Indonesia, the country with the world’s largest Muslim population, to address such concerns. My fieldwork shows that some Muslim women activists in democratizing Indonesia manifest pious critical agency. Pious critical agency is the capacity to engage critically and publicly (...)
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  • Gender, Culture and the Law: Approaches to 'Honour Crimes' in the UK. [REVIEW]Rupa Reddy - 2008 - Feminist Legal Studies 16 (3):305-321.
    This article examines the debate on whether to analyse ‘honour crimes’ as gender-based violence, or as cultural tradition, and the effects of either stance on protection from and prevention of these crimes. In particular, the article argues that the categorisation of honour-related violence as primarily cultural ignores its position within the wider spectrum of gender violence, and may result in a number of unfortunate side-effects, including lesser protection of the rights of women within minority communities, and the stigmatisation of those (...)
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  • Religion, Citizenship and Participation: A Case Study of Immigrant Muslim Women in Norwegian Mosques.Line Nyhagen Predelli - 2008 - European Journal of Women's Studies 15 (3):241-260.
    This article analyses the increasing participation of Muslim women in mosques in Norway in light of current discourses on citizenship, gender and migration. It discusses how various processes in the mosques can be interpreted as contradictory and complex by sometimes increasing the participation of women and promoting liberation, while at other times constraining women'ss activities through various forms of discipline and control. Women are vital for the building of religious institutions among Muslim immigrant communities, and they are slowly achieving more (...)
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  • Fertility Desires and Perceptions of Power in Reproductive Conflict in Ghana.Vrushali Patil, F. Nii-Amoo Dodoo & Laurie F. Derose - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (1):53-73.
    Ghanaian fertility decline may not be associated with women's having greater control over reproduction. Focus groups of young Ghanaian men and women indicate that attitudes supporting men's dominance in fertility decisions characterize even the highly educated. Young women with high fertility desires anticipate being able to stop childbearing when they want to, but they do not expect to be able to continue if their husband wants to stop. Those with low fertility desires do not anticipate being able to stop without (...)
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  • Notes on Not Knowing: Male Ignorance After #MeToo.Rachel O’Neill - 2022 - Feminist Theory 23 (4):490-511.
    The essential premise of #MeToo is that, while large numbers of women are subject to sexual harassment and assault, this reality is not known to or understood by unnamed others. This article interrogates the subject of non-knowing that #MeToo points to but does not name, asking: who exactly does not know, and why? These questions provide the starting point to elaborate the concept of male ignorance. While this lexicon has been fleetingly deployed in canonical feminist works – where it denotes (...)
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  • Hybrid Femininities: Making Sense of Sorority Rankings and Reputation.Mariana Oliver & Simone Ispa-Landa - 2020 - Gender and Society 34 (6):893-921.
    Gender researchers have only recently begun to identify how women perceive and explain the costs and benefits associated with different femininities. Yet status hierarchies among historically white college sororities are explicit and cannot be ignored, forcing sorority women to grapple with constructions of feminine worth. Drawing on interviews with women in these sororities, we are able to capture college women’s attitudes toward status rankings that prioritize adherence to narrow models of gender complementarity. Sorority chapters were ranked according to women’s perceived (...)
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  • Children’s Surnames, Moral Dilemmas: Accounting for the Predominance of Fathers’ Surnames for Children.Colleen Nugent - 2010 - Gender and Society 24 (4):499-525.
    This content analysis examines online accounts of choices of marital and child surnames to understand the predominance of exclusively patrilineal surnames. I demonstrate how surnaming processes present the classic tension between commitment to self and others as moral dilemmas of self versus family, children, and spouse. Social and cultural mechanisms create an either/or exclusive framing and a false dichotomy where women’s selves and others’ needs are incompatible. I also show how some parents reconceptualize family, children, and expectations for men and (...)
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  • (Un)Becoming a Man: Legal Consciousness of the Third Gender Category in Pakistan.Muhammad Azfar Nisar - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (1):59-81.
    In the past decade, a few countries have created a third gender category to legally recognize gender-nonconforming individuals. However, we know relatively little about the response of the gender-nonconforming individuals toward the legal third gender category. To address this gap, this article analyzes the different social, religious, and institutional discourses that have emerged around the recently created third gender category in Pakistan and their influence on the legal consciousness of the Khawaja Sira community, a marginalized gender-nonconforming group. Even though the (...)
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  • Understanding Women’s Participation in Irrigated Agriculture: A Case Study From Senegal. [REVIEW]Marcia L. Nation - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (2):163-176.
    As climate change in West Africa poses profound limitations on rainfed agriculture, policymakers and practitioners may again turn to irrigated agriculture to provide food for a growing population. Gendered analyses of irrigation projects reveal that in many cases women’s participation in irrigated agriculture has been limited due to a lack of access to land and water. Past research in the Upper Valley of the Senegal River suggests that variables other than access to land and water condition women’s participation in irrigated (...)
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  • Safe Spaces for Refugee Women: Towards Cultivating Feminist Solidarity.Hala Nasr - 2022 - Feminist Review 131 (1):10-25.
    Over the last decade, growing concern over Syrian refugee women and girl’s gendered displacement experiences, including gender-based violence, has led to the proliferation of women and girl safe space interventions across neighbouring countries affected by the Syrian conflict. Though diverse in their design and implementation, some of these safe spaces aim to mobilise aspirations for feminist solidarity and collective action, where women recognise their collective power and work together to transform their gendered social conditions. Drawing on feminist ethnographic research in (...)
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  • Can International Human Rights Law Smash the Patriarchy? A Review of ‘Patriarchy’ According to United Nations Treaty Bodies and Special Procedures.Cassandra Mudgway - 2021 - Feminist Legal Studies 29 (1):67-105.
    This article interrogates whether and how the concept of ‘patriarchy’ is used by UN human rights treaty monitoring bodies and special procedures to interpret state obligations to respect and ensure women’s human rights. There are two key points that arise out of this study: first, that several treaty bodies and special procedures purposely and consistently use the concept of ‘patriarchy’ when discussing women’s human rights, and second, that although not all treaty bodies and special procedures have referred to the terms (...)
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  • Forms of Femininity at the End of a Customary Marriage.Elena Moore - 2015 - Gender and Society 29 (6):817-840.
    This paper explores women’s daily practice of resistance built into the racialized and gendered social structure of customary marriages in South Africa. I argue that women resist, accommodate, adapt, and contest power and authority in the decision to leave the marriage, in negotiating the exit from the marriage, and in their approach to the financial consequences of the separation. By using the myriad of daily practices as evidence for resistance, the study identifies three forms of femininities that emerge from the (...)
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  • Love in the Time of Neo-Liberalism: Gender, Work, and Power in a Costa Rican Marriage.Susan E. Mannon - 2006 - Gender and Society 20 (4):511-530.
    Households around the world have shifted structurally from a breadwinner/homemaker model to dual-income earning arrangements. What this trend means for marital power has been a contested issue among scholars. Most studies suggest that household power is determined by a complex interplay between each spouse's economic contributions to the household and existing gender norms. Few scholars, however, have examined how this interplay is worked out under particular political-economic conditions. Responding to the dearth of research on the developing world in this area, (...)
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  • Judith Lorber.Judith Lorber - 2011 - Gender and Society 25 (3):355-359.
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  • Choice, Gift, or Patriarchal Bargain? Women's Consent to In Vitro Fertilization in Male Infertility.Judith Lorber - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):23-36.
    This paper explores the reasons why women who are themselves fertile might consent to undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) with an infertile male partner. The reasons often given are desire to have that particular man's child, or altruism, giving a gift to the partner. Although ethically, the decision should be completely woman's prerogative, because IVF programs usually treat the couple as a unit, she may be offered few other options by the medical staff. In social terms, whether the woman is (...)
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  • Korean Immigrant Women's Challenge to Gender Inequality at Home: The Interplay of Economic Resources, Gender, and Family.in-Sook Lim - 1997 - Gender and Society 11 (1):31-51.
    Based on in-depth interviews with 18 Korean immigrant working couples, this study explores Korean immigrant working wives' ongoing challenge to male dominance at home and to the unequal division of family work. A main factor in wives' being less obedient to their husbands is their psychological resources such as pride, competence, and honor, which they gain from awareness of their contribution to the family economy. Under immigrant family circumstances in which working for family survival is prioritized, wives feel that their (...)
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  • Ethnic Minority Women in the Serbian Academic Community.Karolina Lendák-Kabók - 2021 - European Journal of Women's Studies 28 (4):502-517.
    The aim of this article is to discuss the position of ethnic minority women in relation to their career-building in the Serbian higher education system and reaching decision-making positions. The author defines two hypotheses: that there are invisible biases in the sciences that put ethnic minority women in a challenging position when attempting to build a career in academia, and that these women encounter a glass ceiling when trying to reach more senior positions. The analysis is based on 16 semi-structured (...)
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  • Women's Agency and Household Diplomacy: Negotiating Fundamentalism.Melodye Lehnerer & Shahin Gerami - 2001 - Gender and Society 15 (4):556-573.
    The overall oppressive effect on women's rights of religious fundamentalism has been well documented in the literature. When looking at women's resistance to fundamentalism, it is important to examine not only organized efforts but individual women's agency in subverting or co-opting these movements toward their own ends. Using a series of narratives, the authors discuss four strategies used by Iranian women to negotiate the patriarchal practices of Islamic fundamentalism. These women crafted agency by responding to the demands of family and (...)
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  • Power, Patriarchy, and Gender Conflict in the Vietnamese Immigrant Community.Nazli Kibria - 1990 - Gender and Society 4 (1):9-24.
    Based on an ethnographic study of women's social groups and networks in a community of Vietnamese immigrants recently settled in the United States, this article explores the effects of migration on gender roles and power. The women's groups and networks play an important role in the exchange of social and economic resources among households and in the mediation of disputes between men and women in the family. These community forms are an important source of informal power for women, enabling them (...)
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  • Culture, Social Class, and Income Control in the Lives of Women Garment Workers in Bangladesh.Nazli Kibria - 1995 - Gender and Society 9 (3):289-309.
    This article looks at the income-related experiences of women workers in Bangladesh in the export garment industry, the first modern industry in the country to employ large numbers of women. The analysis draws on in-depth interviews with 34 female sewing machine operators at five factories. Despite the traditionally low economic autonomy of Bangladeshi women, the women's ability to control their income was varied, and in fact, a substantial number of the women workers exercised full control over their wages. Socioeconomic background (...)
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  • Zina and the Moral Regulation of Pakistani Women.Shahnaz Khan - 2003 - Feminist Review 75 (1):75-100.
    From 1998 to 1999, I interviewed women who had been incarcerated under the Zina Ordinance in Pakistan. This led me to an examination of women's moral regulation by their families, a process in which I maintain the state is complicit. I argue against relativist explanations of this process, which view Pakistani culture or notions of timeless Islam as the reason for women's incarceration. Instead, I examine the interconnection of morality with the legal/judicial structures, the relationship between the state and patriarchy (...)
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  • Doing Nonideal Theory About Gender in Global Contexts.Serene J. Khader - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (1):142-165.
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  • Empowerment, Citizenship and Gender Justice: A Contribution to Locally Grounded Theories of Change in Women's Lives.Naila Kabeer - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):216-232.
    Struggles for gender justice by women's movements have sought to give legal recognition to gender equality at both national and international levels. However, such society-wide goals may have little resonance in the lives of individual men and women in contexts where a culture of individual rights is weak or missing and the stress is on the moral economy of kinship and community. While empowerment captures the myriad ways in which intended and unintended changes can enhance the ability of individual women (...)
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  • Masturbation, Semen Collection and Men's IVF Experiences: Anxieties in the Muslim World.Marcia C. Inhorn - 2007 - Body and Society 13 (3):37.
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  • Women, Men, and Patriarchal Bargaining in an Islamic Sufi Order: The Tijaniyya in Kano, Nigeria, 1937 to the Present.Alaine S. Hutson - 2001 - Gender and Society 15 (5):734-753.
    This article describes the rules and scripts that operate in a sub-Saharan African system, the Tijaniyya Islamic Sufi order in Kano, Nigeria. It analyzes the patriarchal bargains between women and men in the order and reveals how the actions of Muslim women with positions of spiritual authority were both independent and shaped by the order's patriarchy. The author argues that larger shifts across several decades in the Islamic world, the international Tijaniyya leadership, and the Nigerian state allowed Kano Tijaniyya women (...)
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  • A Three-Dimensional Model of Women’s Empowerment: Implications in the Field of Microfinance and Future Directions.Marloes A. Huis, Nina Hansen, Sabine Otten & Robert Lensink - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Making Sense of Troubled Livelihoods: Gendered Expectations and Poor Health Narratives in Rural South Africa.Brian Houle, F. Xavier Gómez-Olivé, Nicole Angotti, Sanyu A. Mojola & Erin Ice - 2022 - Gender and Society 36 (5):735-763.
    When men and women cannot attain idealized gendered forms of economic provision and dependence, how do they make sense of this perceived failure? In this article, we posit that poor health narratives serve as a gendered tool to make sense of inadequate livelihoods, even when that inadequacy is attributable to structural conditions. We draw on survey and life-history interview data from middle-aged and older rural South Africans. The survey data show that even after adjusting for biometrically measured health differences, working-age (...)
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  • Overcoming Patriarchal Constraints:: The Reconstruction of Gender Relations Among Mexican Immigrant Women and Men.Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo - 1992 - Gender and Society 6 (3):393-415.
    This article examines how gender shapes the migration and settlement experiences of Mexican immigrant women and men. The article compares the experiences of families in which the husbands departed prior to 1965 to those in which the husbands departed after 1965 and argues that the lengthy spousal separations altered patterns of patriarchal authority and the traditional gendered household division of labor. This induced a trend toward more egalitarian conjugal relations upon settlement in the United States. Examining the changing contexts of (...)
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  • Dress Matters: Change and Continuity in the Dress Practices of Bosnian Muslim Refugee Women.Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo & Kimberly Huisman - 2005 - Gender and Society 19 (1):44-65.
    Dress serves as a discursive daily practice of gender, and this article explains the dress practices of Bosnian Muslim refugee women living in Vermont. These dress practices tend toward elaborate, carefully cultivated styles for hair, makeup, and dress. Based on participant observation, in-depth interviews, and secondary historical sources, the authors seek to explain the meanings and practice of these dress practices. They argue that gendered dress practices reflect agentic processes that are situated within the flow of time and are rooted (...)
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  • THE “WOMEN'S FRONT”: Nationalism, Feminism, and Modernity in Palestine.Frances S. Hasso - 1998 - Gender and Society 12 (4):441-465.
    Nationalisms are polymorphous and often internally contradictory, unleashing emancipatory as well as repressive ideas and forces. This article explores the ideologies and mobilization strategies of two organizations over a 10-year period in the occupied Palestinian territories: a leftist-nationalist party in which women became unusually powerful and its affiliated and remarkably successful nationalist-feminist women's organization. Two factors allowed women to become powerful and facilitated a fruitful coexistence between nationalism and feminism: a commitment to a variant of modernist ideology that was marked (...)
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  • Who Needs [Sex] When You Can Have [Gender]?: Conflicting Discourses on Gender at Beijing.Anne Marie Goetz & Sally Baden - 1997 - Feminist Review 56 (1):3-25.
    ‘Gender’, understood as the social construction of sex, is a key concept for feminists working at the interface of theory and policy. This article examines challenges to the concept which emerged from different groups at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, September 1995, an important arena for struggles over feminist public policies. The first half of the article explores contradictory uses of the concept in the field of gender and development. Viewpoints from some southern activist women at (...)
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  • Feminist-Nation Building in Afghanistan: An Examination of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan.Jennifer L. Fluri - 2008 - Feminist Review 89 (1):34-54.
    Women-led political organizations that employ feminist and nationalist ideologies and operate as separate from, rather than associated with, male-dominated or patriarchal nationalist groups are both significant and under-explored areas of gender, feminist, and nationalism studies. This article investigates the feminist and nationalist vision of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan. RAWA exemplifies an effective political movement that intersects feminist and nationalist politics, where women are active, rather than symbolic, participants within the organization, and help to shape an ideological (...)
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  • Sized Out: Women, Clothing Size, and Inequality.Maddie Evans, Kjerstin Gruys & Katelynn Bishop - 2018 - Gender and Society 32 (2):180-203.
    Feminist scholars have long critiqued the fashion industry’s ultra-thin beauty standards as harmful to women. Combining data from three qualitative studies of women’s clothing retailers—of bras, plus-size clothing, and bridal wear—we shift the analytical focus away from glamorized media images toward the seemingly mundane realm of clothing size standards, examining how women encounter, understand, and navigate these standards in their daily lives. We conceptualize clothing size standards as “floating signifiers,” given their lack of consistency within and across brands and the (...)
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  • The Impact of Migration on Turkish Rural Women: Four Emergent Patterns.Tahire Erman - 1998 - Gender and Society 12 (2):146-167.
    This article explores the diverse experiences of Turkish rural migrant women in the city and how city living enters the definition of gender and the distribution of power in the migrant household. It draws on data collected in an ethnographic study of migrants in Ankara, Turkey, and examines whether this migration improves or deteriorates migrant women's position in the family. Specifically, it identifies four groups of migrant women and speculates on some of the factors that shape their diverse experiences. The (...)
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  • Low-Income Turkish Mothers’ Conceptions and Experiences of Family Life.Gizem Erdem, Merve Adli-Isleyen, Nur Baltalarlı & Ezgi Kılıç - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The current qualitative study explores women’s conceptions of the normative family and their day-to-day family lives. To that aim, we conducted five focus group interviews in two low-income neighborhoods of Istanbul. The sample included 43 women who had at least one child between ages 3 and 8 in their care. Participants were 35.64 years old on average and were all married. Women had approximately two children whose mean age was 7.92 years old. Each focus group was semi-structured, lasted for 1–1.5 (...)
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  • ‘I Pray for the Factory to Continue Earning Money’: The Familial Factory Regime of the ‘Sun’ Food Factory in Turkey.Ermine Erdogan - 2016 - Feminist Review 113 (1):68-84.
    This paper explores the factory regime in the ‘Sun'1 food processing factory in Turkey, drawing on participant observation in the factory, informal interviews with women workers and in-depth interviews with the managers of the factory's ‘gherkin department’ in which I worked. This paper argues that the ‘Sun’ bottling and canning factory is best understood through my concept of the ‘familial factory regime’. By ‘familial factory regime’ I mean a factory regime in which the features of the extended patriarchal family are (...)
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  • Patriarchal Bargains and Latent Avenues of Social Mobility:: Nuns in the Roman Catholic Church.Helen Rose Ebaugh - 1993 - Gender and Society 7 (3):400-414.
    Despite the classic patriarchy of the Roman Catholic church, American Catholic nuns entered into patriarchal bargains that latently gained them access to resources and status within the system. By means of educational advancement and professional careers, encouraged by the male hierarchy as necessary to performing the works of the church, nuns gained both informal power in the system and an awareness of their disadvantaged position. This article analyzes the shifts that have occurred in these bargains during the past 40 years (...)
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  • The Conditions of Politics: Low-Caste Women's Political Agency in Contemporary North Indian Society.Manuela Ciotti - 2009 - Feminist Review 91 (1):113-134.
    In this article I analyse the structural and cultural conditions of low-caste women's political agency in urban north India. Whereas in Western feminist political theory, the sexual division of labour is considered to be a key constraint for women's political participation, I show how this has a secondary relevance in the context analysed. I argue that issues concerning the division of labour are intertwined with and subject to those of male consent and support for women's activities. I illustrate how it (...)
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  • Factory Girls After the Factory: Female Return Migrations in Rural China.Julia Chuang - 2016 - Gender and Society 30 (3):467-489.
    Many scholars of gender and migration assume that migration increases women’s household bargaining power, but this article argues that migration recreates and relies on patriarchal expectations that women return to household domestic labor. It draws on 16 months of ethnographic fieldwork with migrant factory women in China’s export processing zones as well as one migrant-sending community in China. Based on this fieldwork, I argue that despite young women’s desires to continue migrating for factory jobs, older generations perpetuate gendered views of (...)
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  • Negotiating Patriarchy: South Korean Evangelical Women and the Politics of Gender.Kelly H. Chong - 2006 - Gender and Society 20 (6):697-724.
    Based on ethnographic research, this study investigates the meaning and impact of women’s involvement in South Korean evangelicalism. While recent works addressing the “paradox” of women’s participation in conservative religions have highlighted the significance of these religions as unexpected vehicles of gender empowerment and contestation, this study finds that the experiences and consequences of Korean evangelical women’s religiosity are highly contradictory; although crucial in women’s efforts to negotiate the injuries of the modern Confucian-patriarchal family, conversion, for many women, also signifies (...)
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