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  1. Historical Materialism in Medieval China: The Cases of Liu Zongyuan (773-819) and Li Gou.Dawid Rogacz - 2021 - Asian Philosophy 31 (4):385-401.
    ABSTRACT It is commonly assumed that historical materialism was first developed by Karl Marx, whose philosophy is often equated with this idea. The following paper challenges this opinion by showing that historical materialism, understood as a general position within the philosophy of history, can be traced back to two generally unheralded Chinese thinkers: Liu Zongyuan and Li Gou. Historical materialism is here understood as a standpoint built on three tenets: a belief in the dependence of culture on the material fundaments (...)
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  • Shi (勢), STS, and Theory: Or What Can We Learn From Chinese Medicine?Wen-Yuan Lin - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (3):405-428.
    How might science and technology studies and science, technology and society studies learn from its studies of other knowledge traditions? This article explores this question by looking at Chinese medicine. The latter has been under pressure from modernization and “scientization” for a century, and the dynamics of these pressures have been explored “symmetrically” within STS and related disciplines. But in this work, CM has been the “the case” and STS theory has held stable. This article uses a CM term, reasoning-as-propensity, (...)
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  • A Few Steps Toward an Anthropology of the Iconoclastic Gesture.Bruno Latour - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):63-83.
    The ArgumentA large part of our critical acumen depends on a clear distinction between what is real and what is constructed, what is out there in the nature of things and what is in there in the representation we make of them. Something has been lost however for the sake of this clarity and a heavy price has been paid for this dichotomy between ontological questions on the one hand and the epistemological questions on the other: it has become impossible (...)
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  • Violence as Weakness: In China and Beyond.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2003 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):7-28.
  • Realism (Fajia), Human Akrasia, and the Milieu for Ultimate Virtue.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 2 (1):21-44.
  • “Let Chinese Thinking Be Chinese, Not Western”: Sine Qua Non to Globalization.Wu Kuang-Ming - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):193-209.
    Globalization consists of global interculture strengthening local cultures as it depends on them. Globality and locality are interdependent, and “universal” must be replaced by “inter-versal” as existence inter-exists. Chinese thinking thus must be Chinese, not Western, as Western thinking must be Western, not “universal”; China must help the West be Western, as the West must help China be Chinese. As Mrs. Tu speaks English in Chinese syntax, so “sinologists” logicize in Chinese phrases. English speakers parse her to realize the distinctness (...)
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  • From Argument to Assertion.Michael S. Kochin - 2009 - Argumentation 23 (3):387-396.
    Acceptance or rejection of factual assertions is a far more important process than logical validation of arguments. Not only are assertions more persuasive than arguments; this is desirable, since we want our beliefs and actions to be reasonable and not just rational. When do we resort to argument? Real speeches heavy on arguments aim to present the speaker as calm, serious, and knowledgeable. In public life, one argues not in order to demonstrate the claim for which one is arguing, but (...)
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  • Computation and Early Chinese Thought.Carl M. Johnson - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (2):143-159.
    In recent years, it has become conventional to think of the world using metaphors taken from computation. Some have even suggested that the world itself is a kind of cosmological computer. In order to compare these suggestions to the process interpretation of early Daoism, I define computation as ?a process in which the fact that one system is rule governed is used to make reliable correlations to another rule governed system? and apply this definition to Yijing divination. I find that (...)
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  • Thinking Rocks, Living Stones: Reflections on Chinese Lithophilia.Graham Parkes - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (3):75-87.
    Chinese culture is distinguished among the world’s other great traditions by the depth and intensity of its love for rock and stone. This enduring passion manifests itself both in the art of garden making, where rocks form the frame and the central focus of the classical Chinese garden, and also on a smaller scale, in the practice of collecting stones to be displayed on trays or on scholars’ desks indoors. This essay sketches a brief history of lithophilia in China, then (...)
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  • Bibliografía seleccionada y comentada sobre Taoísmo Clásico : Obras generales y Zhuāng zǐ.Javier Bustamante Donas & Juan Luis Varona - 2015 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 20:269-311.
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  • Environmental Representation of the Body.Adrian Cussins - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):15-32.
    Much recent cognitive neuroscientific work on body knowledge is representationalist: “body schema” and “body images”, for example, are cerebral representations of the body (de Vignemont 2009). A framework assumption is that representation of the body plays an important role in cognition. The question is whether this representationalist assumption is compatible with the variety of broadly situated or embodied approaches recently popular in the cognitive neurosciences: approaches in which cognition is taken to have a ‘direct’ relation to the body and to (...)
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  • Research: Philosophy Intercultural.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):378-389.
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  • Don't Mind the Gap: Sinology as an Art of In‐Betweenness.Nicolas Standaert - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (2):91-103.
    Sinology is like a Chinese ritual dance: the key is not the movement, but rather the positions , the moments of non-action ‘in between’, that make rhythm and transformation possible. Sinology itself occupies an in-between position in the landscape of academic disciplines, though it is not the only one to undertake this dance, as various disciplines engage themselves into a similar quest. Its distinctiveness as intellectual inquiry is to point at intervals, interstices, gaps, cracks, pauses, poses, in-between moments or zones (...)
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  • Handbook of Philosophy of Management.Cristina Neesham & Steven Segal (eds.) - 2019
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  • Daoism and Confucianism.Karyn L. Lai - 2014 - In Xiaogan Liu (ed.), Dao Companion to Daoist Philosophy. Springer. pp. 489-511.
  • What is a Situation?Mercedes Valmisa - 2021 - In Livia Kohn (ed.), Coming to Terms with Timelessness. Daoist Time in Comparative Perspective. St. Petersburg, FL, USA: pp. 26-49.
    This paper leads us in reflections regarding the ontological status of a situation inspired by two main sources: the Zhuangzi--a multifarious compilation from Warring States China (ca. 4th c. BCE)--and José Ortega y Gasset's (1883-1955) Unas Lecciones de Metafísica (Some Lessons in Metaphysics)--the transcripts of a course on metaphysics by a Spanish philosopher of the early 20th century. Much as other ontologically subjective entities and events, situations do not preexist the intentional subject: instead, they are created alongside our act of (...)
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  • Two Paradigmatic Strategies for Reading Zhuang Zi's "Happy Fish" Vignette as Philosophy: Guo Xiang's and Wang Fuzhi's Approaches.John R. Williams - 2018 - Comparative Philosophy 9 (2).
    One of the most beloved passages in the Zhuang-Zi text is a dialogue between Hui Zi and Zhuang Zi at the end of the “Qiu-shui” chapter. While this is one of many vignettes involving Hui Zi and Zhuang Zi in the text, this particular vignette has recently drawn attention in Chinese and comparative philosophy circles. The most basic question concerning these studies is whether or not the passage represents a substantial philosophical dispute, or instead idle chitchat between two friends. This (...)
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  • Shen Dao's Theory of Fa and His Influence on Han Fei.Soon-ja Yang - 2013 - In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. pp. 47--63.
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  • Han Feizi and the Old Master: A Comparative Analysis and Translation of Han Feizi Chapter 20,“Jie Lao,” and Chapter 21,“Yu Lao”. [REVIEW]Sarah A. Queen - 2013 - In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. pp. 197--256.
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  • Epistemological Issues in the Theory of Chinese Medicine.Hai Hong - 2012 - Dissertation, London School of Economics and Political Science
    Traditional Chinese Medicine has been criticized for being unscientific because the theory on which it is based involves entities like qi and ’meridians’ that appear ambiguous and because the internal ‘organs’ like the kidney and the spleen are very different from those of modern anatomy and physiology. Even more so, TCM methods of therapy based on the yin-yang principle, the model of the five elements, and the classification of illnesses according to standard constellations of symptoms are largely unproven by the (...)
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