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  1. To Create Psychology’s Own Capital.Mohamed Elhammoumi - 2002 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (1):89–104.
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  • Simulating Marx: Herbert A. Simon's Cognitivist Approach to Dialectical Materialism.Enrico Petracca - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):101-125.
    Starting in the 1950s, computer programs for simulating cognitive processes and intelligent behaviour were the hallmark of Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Intelligence and ‘cognitivist’ cognitive science. This article examines a somewhat neglected case of simulation pursued by one of the founding fathers of simulation methodology, Herbert A. Simon. In the 1970s and 1980s, Simon had repeated contacts with Marxist countries and scientists, in the context of which he advanced the idea that cognitivism could be used as a framework for simulating dialectical (...)
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  • The Mental Test as a Boundary Object in Early-20th-Century Russian Child Science.Andy Byford - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (4):22-58.
    This article charts the history of mental testing in the context of the rise and fall of Russian child science between the 1890s and the 1930s. Tracing the genealogy of testing in scientific experimentation, scholastic assessment, medical diagnostics and bureaucratic accounting, it follows the displacements of this technology along and across the boundaries of the child science movement. The article focuses on three domains of expertise – psychology, pedagogy and psychiatry, examining the key guises that mental testing assumed in them (...)
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  • The Impossible Project of Ivan Pavlov.David Joravsky - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):265-280.
  • Sterility and Suggestion: Minor Psychotherapy in the Soviet Union, 1956–1985.Aleksandra Brokman - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (4):83-106.
    This article explores the concept of minor or general psychotherapy championed by physicians seeking to popularise psychotherapy in the post-Stalin Soviet Union. Understood as a set of skills and principles meant to guide behaviour towards and around patients, this form of psychotherapy was portrayed as indispensable for physicians of all specialities as well as for all personnel of medical institutions. This article shows how, as a result of Soviet teaching on the power of suggestion to influence human organisms, every interaction (...)
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  • Soviet Psychiatry and the Origins of the Sluggish Schizophrenia Concept, 1912–1936.Benjamin Zajicek - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (2):88-105.
    This article seeks to understand the origins of the Soviet concept of ‘sluggish schizophrenia’, a diagnostic category that was used to imprison political dissidents in the post-WWII era. It focuses on the 1920s and 1930s, a period when Soviet psychiatrists attempted to find ways to diagnose schizophrenia at its earliest stages. The new Soviet state supported these efforts, funding new institutions where clinicians encountered types of patients they had not previously studied. Conceptual disagreements arose about what symptoms could be used (...)
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  • Vygotsky’s Reception in the West: The Italian Case Between Marxism and Communism.Luciano Mecacci - 2015 - History of the Human Sciences 28 (2):173-184.
    The diffusion of Vygotsky’s work in Italy was analysed by first considering the issues related to the translation of his texts since the 1970s, particularly with regard to the project promoted by the publishing house of the Italian Communist Party and supervised by the author of this article. Second, the reception of cultural-historical theory was discussed in the context of Italian psychology and medicine in the 1970s and 1980s. After an early acceptance of Pavlovian theory by a few Italian psychologists (...)
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  • Deconstructing Vygotsky’s Victimization Narrative: A Re-Examination of the ‘Stalinist Suppression’ of Vygotskian Theory.Jennifer Fraser & Anton Yasnitsky - 2015 - History of the Human Sciences 28 (2):128-153.
    Although many facets of Lev Vygotsky’s life have drawn considerable attention from historians of science, perhaps the most popular feature of his personal narrative was that his work was actively chastised by the Stalinist government. Almost all contemporary references to Vygotsky’s personal history emphasize that from 1936 to 1956, it was forbidden to either discuss or disseminate any of Vygotsky’s works within the Soviet Union. Although this ‘Vygotsky ban’ is both widely acknowledged and frequently cited by a variety of scholars, (...)
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  • Psychological Theory as Administrative Politics: Boris Lomov’s Systems Approach in the Context of the Soviet Science Establishment.Vladimir Konnov - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):218-242.
    The article is a study into the advent of the ‘systems approach’ in Soviet psychology in the 1970s. This arose mainly through the theoretical publications of B. F. Lomov, written after he had been appointed director of the newly established Institute of Psychology. These publications are examined as reflections of those interests related to the sociopolitical role of the director of this leading psychology institution, which was officially charged with building a common theoretical and methodological framework for all Soviet psychology. (...)
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  • A Family Discussion: The Herzens on the Science of Man.Irina Sirotkina - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):1-18.
    The article deals with the argument about free will and determinism between A. I. Herzen (1812—70) and his son, the physiologist A. A. Herzen (1839—1906). The topic, sufficiently familiar to Herzen scholars, interests me above all for its relevance to the history of science. The polemics between father and son touched upon such burning questions of the day as materialism in understanding human beings, positivism as scientific methodology, and the relation of the human sciences to the natural sciences. Seeing physiological (...)
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  • Pavlov and the Equivalence of Associability in Classical Conditioning.S. R. Coleman - 2007 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):115.
    The discovery of selective associability of cues in classical conditioning has often been treated as an embarrassment to Pavlov, because he has been represented as a proponent of the "equivalence of associability of cues." According to that doctrine, except for the influence of differences in stimulus intensity, all environmental stimuli are equally susceptible to becoming conditioned stimuli if they are arranged in a suitable time-relation to any effective unconditioned stimulus . The current paper asks whether Pavlov explicitly made such a (...)
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  • The Meaning of “Inhibition” and the Discourse of Order.Roger Smith - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2):237-263.