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  1. Does a Help Giver Seek the Help from Others? The Consistency and Licensing Mechanisms and the Role of Leader Respect.Qiqi Wang, Xueling Fan, Jun Liu & Wenjing Cai - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    This study adopts an intrapersonal perspective to explore how and when employees shift roles from help giver to help seeker by investigating the relationship between their help-giving and following help-seeking behavior. Based on self-regulation theory, we hypothesize two contradictory psychological processes via which employees determine whether to seek help after giving help. Importantly, we differentiate autonomous help-seeking from dependent help-seeking and propose stronger effects of help-giving on dependent help-seeking. Further, we identify leader respect as a moderator to solve the opposite (...)
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  • The Paradox of Paranoia: How One’s Own Self-Interested Unethical Behavior Can Spark Paranoia and Reduce Affiliative Behavior Toward Coworkers.Annika Hillebrandt, Daniel L. Brady, Maria Francisca Saldanha & Laurie J. Barclay - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    How are individuals affected by their own self-interested unethical behavior? Although self-interested unethical behavior commonly occurs as people attempt to advantage themselves, we argue that this unethical behavior can have deleterious implications for individuals and their social relationships. We propose that engaging in self-interested unethical behavior is positively related to state paranoia—an aversive psychological state. In turn, the social cognitive biases underlying state paranoia can prompt people to misjudge the potential for social threat. This may motivate them to curtail coworker-directed (...)
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  • Does A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors.Xingwen Chen, Zheng Zhu & Jun Liu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):615-634.
    The concept of _feeling trusted_, which has received far less attention from researchers than _trusting_, refers to the trustee’s awareness of trustor’s exposed vulnerability and positive expectations. Previous research has merely centered on employees’ feeling of being trusted by their leaders and its influences on their work-related outcomes, but there is little work about the impact of leader feeling trusted by employees. Grounded in social exchange theory and moral licensing theory, the current research centers on explaining why leaders’ sense of (...)
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  • Unable to Resist the Temptation to Tell the Truth or to Lie for the Organization? Identification Makes the Difference.Carolin Baur, Roman Soucek, Ulrich Kühnen & Roy F. Baumeister - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (4):643-662.
    Previous research indicates that the depletion of self-regulatory resources can promote unethical behavior that benefits the self. Extending this literature, we focus on norm-transgressing behavior that is intended to primarily benefit others. In particular, we predicted a differing effect of self-regulatory resource depletion on dishonesty that benefits one’s group, depending on the degree of identification with the group. Following a dual process approach, we argue that if identification with the group is strong, then people may have an automatic inclination to (...)
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  • Will You Forgive Your Supervisor’s Wrongdoings? The Moral Licensing Effect of Ethical Leader Behaviors.Rong Wang & Darius K.-S. Chan - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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