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  1. Combining Ethics and Compliance: A Systems Psychodynamic Inquiry Into Praxis and Outcomes.Jeremias J. Klerk - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
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  • The Nature of the Self, Self-Regulation and Moral Action: Implications From the Confucian Relational Self and Buddhist Non-Self.Irene Chu & Mai Chi Vu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    The concept of the self and its relation to moral action is complex and subject to varying interpretations, not only between different academic disciplines but also across time and space. This paper presents empirical evidence from a cross-cultural study on the Buddhist and Confucian notions of self in SMEs in Vietnam and Taiwan. The study employs Hwang’s Mandala Model of the Self, and its extension into Shiah’s non-self-model, to interpret how these two Eastern philosophical representations of the self, the Confucian (...)
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  • A Falling of the Veils: Turning Points and Momentous Turning Points in Leadership and the Creation of CSR.Christine A. Hemingway & Ken Starkey - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):875-890.
    This article uses the life stories approach to leadership and leadership development. Using exploratory, qualitative data from a Forbes Global 2000 and FTSE 100 company, we discuss the role of the turning point as an important antecedent of leadership in corporate social responsibility. We argue that TPs are causally efficacious, linking them to the development of life narratives concerned with an evolving sense of personal identity. Using both a multi-disciplinary perspective and a multi-level focus on CSR leadership, we identify four (...)
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  • Curbing the Undesirable Effects of Emotional Exhaustion on Ethical Behaviors and Performance: A Salesperson–Manager Dyadic Approach.Bruno Lussier, Nathaniel N. Hartmann & Willy Bolander - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 169 (4):747-766.
    Recent events and popularized stereotypes call into question the ethics of salesperson behaviors. Although prior research demonstrates that salespeople’s emotional exhaustion can have negative consequences for several job outcomes, little is known about the factors that can mitigate such relationships—particularly the relationship between emotional exhaustion and ethical behavior. To remedy this knowledge gap, we draw from self-control theory to propose a novel theoretical framework and develop hypotheses. These hypotheses are tested on a unique dataset consisting of survey data collected from (...)
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  • Moral Disengagement at Work: A Review and Research Agenda.Alexander Newman, Huong Le, Andrea North-Samardzic & Michael Cohen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):535-570.
    Originally conceptualized by Bandura as the process of cognitive restructuring that allows individuals to disassociate with their internal moral standards and behave unethically without feeling distress, moral disengagement has attracted the attention of management researchers in recent years. An increasing body of research has examined the factors which lead people to morally disengage and its related outcomes in the workplace. However, the conceptualization of moral disengagement, how it should be measured, the manner in which it develops, and its influence on (...)
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  • Moral Rationalization Contributes More Strongly to Escalation of Unethical Behavior Among Low Moral Identifiers Than Among High Moral Identifiers.Laetitia B. Mulder & Eric van Dijk - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Fences as Controls to Reduce Accountants’ Rationalization.Alan Reinstein & Eileen Z. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):477-488.
    Occupational fraud frequently involves the direct or indirect participation of professional accountants. To reduce fraud, companies often focus on the incentive/pressure and opportunity legs of the fraud triangle, perhaps believing that rationalization is beyond their control. We argue that rationalization reduction is necessary to minimize occupational fraud. We propose that educators and PA consider incorporating fences as controls to reduce rationalization. Because they focus on compliance and risk avoidance and are non-negotiable, fences appeal to accountant’s Myers Briggs personalities and conventional (...)
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