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  1. How experience makes a difference: practitioners' views on the use of deferred consent in paediatric and neonatal emergency care trials.Kerry Woolfall, Lucy Frith, Carrol Gamble & Bridget Young - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):45.
    In 2008 UK legislation was amended to enable the use of deferred consent for paediatric emergency care (EC) trials in recognition of the practical and ethical difficulties of obtaining prospective consent in an emergency situation. However, ambiguity about how to make deferred consent acceptable to parents, children and practitioners remains. In particular, little is known about practitioners’ views and experiences of seeking deferred consent in this setting.
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  • How do parents experience being asked to enter a child in a randomised controlled trial?Valerie Shilling & Bridget Young - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):1-.
    BackgroundAs the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words.DiscussionParents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to care for (...)
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  • Exceptions to the rule of informed consent for research with an intervention.Susanne Rebers, Neil K. Aaronson, Flora E. van Leeuwen & Marjanka K. Schmidt - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundIn specific situations it may be necessary to make an exception to the general rule of informed consent for scientific research with an intervention. Earlier reviews only described subsets of arguments for exceptions to waive consent.MethodsHere, we provide a more extensive literature review of possible exceptions to the rule of informed consent and the accompanying arguments based on literature from 1997 onwards, using both Pubmed and PsycINFO in our search strategy.ResultsWe identified three main categories of arguments for the acceptability of (...)
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  • The challenges of seeking consent from adults to participate in acute research studies.Jan Lecouturier, Lynne Stobbart, Madeleine J. Murtagh, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Stephen J. Louw & Helen Rodgers - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (2):73-76.
    In this paper the current legislative landscape and the challenges researchers face in obtaining informed consent in acute situations are explored. In such situations, some current guidelines can be difficult or impossible to apply. Capacity should be formally assessed before consent is sought to ensure that vulnerable persons are neither inappropriately recruited to a study nor denied the opportunity to participate. However, there is little guidance in current legislation as to how this should be achieved. When the patient is considered (...)
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  • Written versus verbal consent: a qualitative study of stakeholder views of consent procedures used at the time of recruitment into a peripartum trial conducted in an emergency setting.J. Lawton, N. Hallowell, C. Snowdon, J. E. Norman, K. Carruthers & F. C. Denison - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):36.
    Obtaining prospective written consent from women to participate in trials when they are experiencing an obstetric emergency is challenging. Alternative consent pathways, such as gaining verbal consent at enrolment followed, later, by obtaining written consent, have been advocated by some clinicians and bioethicists but have received little empirical attention. We explored women’s and staff views about the consent procedures used during the internal pilot of a trial, where the protocol permitted staff to gain verbal consent at recruitment. Interviews with staff (...)
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  • A comprehensive systematic review of stakeholder attitudes to alternatives to prospective informed consent in paediatric acute care research.Jeremy Furyk, Kris McBain-Rigg, Bronia Renison, Kerrianne Watt, Richard Franklin, Theophilus I. Emeto, Robin A. Ray, Franz E. Babl & Stuart Dalziel - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):89.
    A challenge of performing research in the paediatric emergency and acute care setting is obtaining valid prospective informed consent from parents. The ethical issues are complex, and it is important to consider the perspective of participants, health care workers and researchers on research without prospective informed consent while planning this type of research. We performed a systematic review according to PRISMA guidelines, of empirical evidence relating to the process, experiences and acceptability of alternatives to prospective informed consent, in the paediatric (...)
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  • Research in Emergency and Critical Care Settings: Debates, Obstacles and Solutions.Ayman El-Menyar, Mohammad Asim, Rifat Latifi & Hassan Al-Thani - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1605-1626.
    Research is an integral part of evidence-based practice in the emergency department and critical care unit that improves patient management. It is important to understand the need and major obstacles for conducting research in emergency settings. Herein, we review the literature for the obligations, ethics and major implications of emergency research and the associated limiting factors influencing research activities in critical care and emergency settings. We reviewed research engines such as PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE for the last two decades using (...)
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