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  1. Radical, Relevant, Reflective and Brilliant: Towards the Future of Business Ethics.Laura J. Spence - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (3):829-834.
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  • Let’s Join Forces: Institutional Resilience and Multistakeholder Partnerships in Crises.Gorgi Krlev - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    Institutional resilience refers to the capacity of institutions to deal with adversity. Crises are a major source of adversity. However, we poorly understand the relations between institutional resilience and crises. Through a comparative process tracing across three European countries, I investigate how multistakeholder partnerships in work integration contributed to institutional resilience in response to the economic and the refugee crises. I present these foremost as moral crises, where public, private, and nonprofit actors choose to engage or not engage out of (...)
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  • Looking Good in the Eyes of Stakeholders: Corporate Giving and Corporate Acquisitions.Yongqiang Gao, Miaohan Zhang & Haibin Yang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    In this study we examine how a firm’s corporate philanthropic behavior may affect its subsequent acquisitions. Drawing upon stakeholder theory, we argue that firms may strategically use philanthropic donations to obtain support or approval from stakeholders so as to advance subsequent acquisitions, suggesting a positive relationship between corporate giving and corporate acquisitions in terms of both acquisition number and value. We further contend that stakeholders’ support for acquisitions would be even more critical for firms with negative or conservative attitudes to (...)
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  • Particularizing Nonhuman Nature in Stakeholder Theory: The Recognition Approach.Teea Kortetmäki, Anna Heikkinen & Ari Jokinen - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Stakeholder theory has grown into one of the most frequent approaches to organizational sustainability. Stakeholder research has provided considerable insight on organization–nature relations, and advanced approaches that consider the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. However, nonhuman nature is typically approached as an ambiguous, unified entity. Taking nonhumans adequately into account requires greater detail for both grounding the status of nonhumans and particularizing nonhuman entities as a set of potential organizational stakeholders with different characteristics, vulnerabilities, and needs. We utilize the philosophical (...)
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  • Do CEOs with Sent-Down Movement Experience Foster Corporate Environmental Responsibility?Dayuan Li, Jialin Jiang, Lu Zhang, Chen Huang & Ding Wang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    As environmental issues have become increasingly prominent around the world, corporate environmental responsibility has begun to attract more attention. As the decision-makers of firms, top executives play an important role in the environmentally ethical behavior of their corporations. Few studies, however, have explored the motivations behind corporations’ environmentally responsible behavior from the perspective of how CEOs’ early experiences shape their decisions. This paper explores the impact that CEOs who experienced the Send-down movement have on their companies’ environmentally responsible behavior and (...)
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  • Ethical Research in Business Ethics.Gazi Islam & Michelle Greenwood - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (1):1-5.
    In this editorial essay, we argue that business ethics research should be aware of the ethical implications of its own methodological choices, and that these implications include, but go beyond, mere compliance with standardized ethical norms. Methodological choices should be made specifically with reference to their effects on the world, both within and outside the academy. Awareness of these effects takes researchers beyond assuring ethics in their methods to more fully consider the ethics of their methods as knowledge practices that (...)
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  • Quantitative Research on Corporate Social Responsibility: A Quest for Relevance and Rigor in a Quickly Evolving, Turbulent World.Shuili Du, Assaad El Akremi & Ming Jia - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    In this article, the co-editors of the corporate responsibility: quantitative issues section of the journal provide an overview of the quantitative CSR field and offer some new perspectives on where the field is going. They highlight key issues in developing impactful, theory-driven, and ethically grounded research and call for research that examines complex problems facing businesses and the society (e.g., big data and artificial intelligence, political polarization, and the role of CSR in generating social impact). By examining topics that are (...)
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  • A Framework for Authentic Ethical Decision Making in the Face of Grand Challenges: A Lonerganian Gradation.Patricia Larres & Martin Kelly - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (2):521-533.
    This paper contributes to the contemporary business ethics narrative by proposing an approach to corporate ethical decision making (EDM) which serves as an alternative to the imposition of codes and standards to address the ethical consequences of grand challenges, like COVID-19, which are impacting today’s society. Our alternative approach to EDM embraces the concept of reflexive thinking and ethical consciousness among the individual agents who collectively are the corporation and who make ethical decisions, often in isolation, removed from the collocated (...)
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  • Reviewing Paradox Theory in Corporate Sustainability Toward a Systems Perspective.Simone Carmine & Valentina De Marchi - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    The complexity of current social and environmental grand challenges generates many conflicts and tensions at the individual, organization and/or systems levels. Paradox theory has emerged as a promising way to approach such a complexity of corporate sustainability going beyond the instrumental business-case perspective and achieving superior sustainability performance. However, the fuzziness in the empirical use of the concept of “paradox” and the absence of a systems perspective limits its potential. In this paper, we perform a systematic review and content analysis (...)
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  • Corporate Purpose and Employee Sustainability Behaviors.C. B. Bhattacharya, Sankar Sen, Laura Marie Edinger-Schons & Michael Neureiter - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    This paper examines the effects of employees’ sense that they work for a purpose-driven company on their workplace sustainability behaviors. Conceptualizing corporate purpose as an overarching, relevant, shared ethical vision of why a company exists and where it needs to go, we argue that it is particularly suited for driving employee sustainability behaviors, which are more ethically complex than the types of employee ethical behaviors typically examined by prior research. Through four studies, two involving the actual employees of construction companies, (...)
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  • “Everyone Has a Truth”: Forms of Ecological Embeddedness in an Interorganizational Context.Lucie Baudoin & Daniel Arenas - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Environmental issues involve a wide range of actors often brought together in processes of collaborative environmental governance. Nonetheless, such actors frequently disagree on the definition of these issues. Even sharing an environmental concern does not preclude disagreements. This paper takes the concept of ecological embeddedness—so far analyzed in a single community—to explore differences of views among actors involved in collaborative environmental governance. It does so by pursuing a qualitative study of French River Basin Committees. Our findings show that Basin Committee (...)
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