Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Integrating Multiple Knowledge Systems Into Environmental Decision-Making: Two Case Studies of Participatory Biodiversity Initiatives in Canada and Their Implications for Conceptions of Education and Public Involvement.Elin Kelsey - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (3):381-396.
    Biodiversity initiatives have traditionally operated within a 'science-first' model of environmental decision - making. The model assumes a hierarchical relationship in which scientific knowledge is elevated above other knowledge systems. Consequently, other types of knowledge held by the public, such as traditional or lay knowledges, are undervalued and under -represented in biodiversity projects. Drawing upon two case studies of biodiversity initiatives in Canada, this paper looks at the role that constructivist conceptions of education play in the integration of alternative knowledge (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Will Neuroscientific Discoveries About Free Will and Selfhood Change Our Ethical Practices?Chris Kaposy - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (1):51-59.
    Over the past few years, a number of authors in the new field of neuroethics have claimed that there is an ethical challenge presented by the likelihood that the findings of neuroscience will undermine many common assumptions about human agency and selfhood. These authors claim that neuroscience shows that human agents have no free will, and that our sense of being a “self” is an illusory construction of our brains. Furthermore, some commentators predict that our ethical practices of assigning moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Integrating and Enacting 'Social and Ethical Issues' in Nanotechnology Practices.Ana Viseu & Heather Maguire - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):195-209.
    The integration of nanotechnology’s ‘social and ethical issues’ (SEI) at the research and development stage is one of the defining features of nanotechnology governance in the United States. Mandated by law, integration extends the field of nanotechnology to include a role for the “social”, the “public” and the social sciences and humanities in research and development (R&D) practices and agendas. Drawing from interviews with scientists, engineers and policymakers who took part in an oral history of the “Future of Nanotechnology” symposium (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Public Participation in the Making of Science Policy.Darrin Durant - 2010 - Perspectives on Science 18 (2):pp. 189-225.
    This paper argues that, because Science and Technology Studies lost contact with political philosophy, its defense of public participation in policy-making involving technical claims is normatively unsatisfactory. Current penchants for political under-laboring and normative individualism are critiqued, and the connections between STS and theorists of deliberative democracy are explored. A conservative normativity is proposed, and STS positions on public participation are discussed in relation to current questions about individual and group rights in a liberal democracy. The result is avenues to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Deliberative Public Opinion: Development of a Social Construct.Kieran C. O’Doherty - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (4):124-145.
    Generally, public opinion is measured via polls or survey instruments, with a majority of responses in a particular direction taken to indicate the presence of a given ‘public opinion’. However, discursive psychological and related scholarship has shown that the ontological status of both individual opinion and public opinion is highly suspect. In the first part of this article I draw on this body of work to demonstrate that there is currently no meaningful theoretical foundation for the construct of public opinion (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mobile Phones and Service Stations: Rumour, Risk and Precaution.Adam Burgess - 2007 - Diogenes 54 (1):125 - 139.
    This paper considers the implications of precautionary restrictions against technologies, in the context of the potential for creating and sustaining rumours. It focuses on the restriction against mobile phone use at petrol stations, based on the rumour that a spark might cause an explosion. Rumours have been substantiated by precautionary usage warnings from mobile phone manufacturers, petrol station usage restrictions, and a general lack of technical understanding. Petrol station employees have themselves spread the rumour about alleged incidents, filling the information (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ¿Nuevos patrones de investigación? Dinámicas de apertura y cierre en el proceso de integración socio-técnica.Andoni Eizagirre - 2019 - Arbor 195 (794):528.
    La formulación de las políticas de investigación y desarrollo está siendo transformada de manera novedosa en los documentos más recientes que se elaboran en Europa. Una de las peculiaridades es que los patrones de investigación transitan hacia prácticas científico-tecnológicas más interactivas entre los distintos actores de la sociedad. Así, como respuesta a la naturaleza compleja de la investigación las primeras medidas se revelan en aquellas estrategias para la promoción de actitudes emprendedoras y colaborativas entre los actores académico-empresariales de la investigación (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Trust in Nanotechnology? On Trust as Analytical Tool in Social Research on Emerging Technologies.Trond Grønli Åm - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):15-28.
    Trust has become an important aspect of evaluating the relationship between lay public and technology implementation. Experiences have shown that a focus on trust provides a richer understanding of reasons for backlashes of technology in society than a mere focus of public understanding of risks and science communication. Therefore, trust is also widely used as a key concept for understanding and predicting trust or distrust in emerging technologies. But whereas trust broadens the scope for understanding established technologies with well-defined questions (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Social Representations Approach To The Communication Between Different Spheres: An Analysis Of The Impacts Of Two Discursive Formats.Susana Batel & Paula Castro - 2009 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (4):415-433.
    This paper discusses the potential of the notions of reification and consensualization as developed by the theory of social representations as analytical tools for addressing the communication between the lay and scientific spheres. Social Representations Theory started by offering an over-sharp distinction between the reified and the consensual universes of which science and common sense, respectively, were presented as paradigmatic. This paper, however, suggests that the notions of consensual and reified can be considered as describing two distinct communicative formats: reification (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Policy Considerations for Random Allocation of Research Funds.Shahar Avin - unknown
    There are now several proposals for introducing random elements into the process of funding allocation for research, and some initial implementation of this policy by funding bodies. The proposals have been supported on efficiency grounds, with models, including social epistemology models, showing random allocation could increase the generation of significant truths in a community of scientists when compared to funding by peer review. The models in the literature are, however, fairly abstract. This paper introduces some of the considerations that are (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Interdisciplinarity and Climate Change: Transforming Knowledge and Practice for Our Global Future.Ted Benton - 2013 - Journal of Critical Realism 12 (2):260 - 265.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Scientific Communication and the Nature of Science.Kristian H. Nielsen - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (9):2067-2086.
  • Risk and Responsibility in a Manufactured World.Luigi Pellizzoni - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (3):463-478.
    Recent criticisms of traditional understandings of risk, responsibility and the division of labour between science and politics build on the idea of the co-produced character of the natural and social orders, making a case for less ambitious and more inclusive policy processes, where questions of values and goals may be addressed together with questions of facts and means, causal liabilities and principled responsibilities. Within the neo-liberal political economy, however, the contingency of the world is depicted as a source of unprecedented (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Are There Limits to Scientists' Obligations to Seek and Engage Dissenters?Kristen Intemann & Inmaculada de Melo-Martín - 2014 - Synthese 191 (12):2751-2765.
    Dissent is thought to play a valuable role in science, so that scientific communities ought to create opportunities for receiving critical feedback and take dissenting views seriously. There is concern, however, that some dissent does more harm than good. Dissent on climate change and evolutionary theory, for example, has confused the public, created doubt about existing consensus, derailed public policy, and forced scientists to devote resources to respond. Are there limits to the extent to which scientific communities have obligations to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Revisiting the Cultural Dope.Michael Lynch - 2012 - Human Studies 35 (2):223-233.
    This essay focuses on the "cultural dope," an ironic reference in Harold Garfinkel's Studies in Ethnomethodology to the rule-following actor in conventional sociological theories. In the nearly half-century since the publication of that book, the "cultural dope" has been incorporated into numerous criticisms of "models of man" in the human sciences. Garfinkel's account appeals to many writers because it seems to present an alternative picture of the actor: an individual who is self-aware, reflective, and skilled in the conduct of daily (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • From Deliberation to Production: Public Participation in Science and Technology Policies of the European Commission.Hadrien Macq, Élise Tancoigne & Bruno J. Strasser - 2020 - Minerva 58 (4):489-512.
    This article investigates how a discourse about the role and value of public participation in science, technology, and innovation emerged and evolved in the research policies of the European Commission. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, two main discourses have been successively institutionalized: the first focused on participation in policy-making, while the second aimed at participation in the production of knowledge and innovation. This paper distinguishes three main institutional phases: a phase dedicated to public participation in the governance of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Opening Up for Participation in Agro-Biodiversity Conservation: The Expert-Lay Interplay in a Brazilian Social Movement. [REVIEW]Ana Delgado - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (6):559-577.
    In science and environmental studies, there is a general concern for the democratization of the expert-lay interplay. However, the democratization of expertise does not necessarily lead to more sustainable decisions. If citizens do not take the sustainable choice, what should experts and decision makers do? Should the expert-lay interplay be dissolved? In thinking about how to shape the expert-lay interplay in a better way in agro-biodiversity conservation, I take the case of the MST (Movimento Sem Terra/Landless People’s Movement), possibly the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On Nanotechnology and Ambivalence: The Politics of Enthusiasm. [REVIEW]Matthew Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):131-142.
    The promise of scientific and technological innovation – particularly in fields such as nanotechnology – is increasingly set against what has been articulated as a deficit in public trust in both the new technologies and regulatory mechanisms. Whilst the development of new technology is cast as providing contributions to both quality of life and national competitiveness, what has been termed a ‘legitimacy crisis’ is seen as threatening the vitality of this process. However in contrast to the risk debates that dominated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • How Knowledge Deficit Interventions Fail to Resolve Beginning Farmer Challenges.Adam Calo - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (2):367-381.
    Beginning farmer initiatives like the USDA’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program, farm incubators, and small-scale marketing innovations offer new entrant farmers agricultural training, marketing and business assistance, and farmland loans. These programs align with alternative food movement goals to revitalize the anemic U.S. small farm sector and repopulate landscapes with socially and environmentally diversified farms. Yet even as these initiatives seek to support prospective farmers with tools for success through a knowledge dissemination model, they remain mostly individualistic and entrepreneurial (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Strength of Ethical Matrixes as a Tool for Normative Analysis Related to Technological Choices: The Case of Geological Disposal for Radioactive Waste.Céline Kermisch & Christophe Depaus - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):29-48.
    The ethical matrix is a participatory tool designed to structure ethical reflection about the design, the introduction, the development or the use of technologies. Its collective implementation, in the context of participatory decision-making, has shown its potential usefulness. On the contrary, its implementation by a single researcher has not been thoroughly analyzed. The aim of this paper is precisely to assess the strength of ethical matrixes implemented by a single researcher as a tool for conceptual normative analysis related to technological (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Avoiding Empty Rhetoric: Engaging Publics in Debates About Nanotechnologies.Renee Kyle & Susan Dodds - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (1):81-96.
    Despite the amount of public investment in nanotechnology ventures in the developed world, research shows that there is little public awareness about nanotechnology, and public knowledge is very limited. This is concerning given that nanotechnology has been heralded as ‘revolutionising’ the way we live. In this paper, we articulate why public engagement in debates about nanotechnology is important, drawing on literature on public engagement and science policy debate and deliberation about public policy development. We also explore the significance of timing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • A Cultural Political Economy of Research and Innovation in an Age of Crisis.David Tyfield - 2012 - Minerva 50 (2):149-167.
    Science and technology policy is both faced by unprecedented challenges and itself undergoing seismic shifts. First, policy is increasingly demanding of science that it fixes a set of epochal and global crises. On the other hand, practices of scientific research are changing rapidly regarding geographical dispersion, the institutions and identities of those involved and its forms of knowledge production and circulation. Furthermore, these changes are accelerated by the current upheavals in public funding of research, higher education and technology development in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Legalising Science.Mariachiara Tallacchini - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (3):329-337.
    The legal view of science has changed throughtime, moving from a positivist and noncriticalposition of law towards science to a criticalview of science – providing the potential formore objective knowledge, but value-laden aswell – and of the role of society. This paperexplores some judicial cases that illustratethese attitudes, suggesting that reference toscience can be rigorouslyand equitably made when it serves the cause oftransparency and democratisation both inscience and in law.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Constructivism in School Science Education: Powerful Model or the Most Dangerous Intellectual Tendency?Edgar W. Jenkins - 2000 - Science & Education 9 (6):599-610.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Votes and Lab Coats: Democratizing Scientific Research and Science Policy: Wiebe E. Bijker, Roland Bal, and Ruud Hendriks: The Paradox of Scientific Authority: The Role of Scientific Advice in Democracies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009, 223pp, $32 HBMark B. Brown: Science in Democracy: Expertise, Institutions, and Representation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009, 354pp, $29 PBMassimiano Bucchi: Beyond Technocracy: Science, Politics and Citizens. Translated by Adrian Belton. Dordrecht: Springer, 2009, 106pp, €99.95 HBMichel Callon, Pierre Lascoumes, and Yannick Barthe: Acting in an Uncertain World: An Essay on Technical Democracy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2009, 287pp, $37 HBPhilip Kitcher. Science in a Democratic Society. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2011, 270pp, $28 HB. [REVIEW]Gürol Irzık & A. Faik Kurtulmuş - 2013 - Metascience 22 (1):45-61.
  • Public Misunderstanding of Science? Reframing the Problem of Vaccine Hesitancy.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (5):552-581.
    The public rejection of scientific claims is widely recognized by scientific and governmental institutions to be threatening to modern democratic societies. Intense conflict between science and the public over diverse health and environmental issues have invited speculation by concerned officials regarding both the source of and the solution to the problem of public resistance towards scientific and policy positions on such hot-button issues as global warming, genetically modified crops, environmental toxins, and nuclear waste disposal. The London Royal Society’s influential report (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • La Ciencia de la Ciudadanía: Más Allá de la Necesidad de Expertos.Steve Fuller - 2003 - Isegoría 28:33-53.
    Comienzo examinando algunas pistas, en gran medida falsas, que se han seguido desde los griegos para definir la naturaleza de la ciudadanía científica en una democracia. Sin embargo, el linaje que va desde Platón al positivismo proporciona un contexto útil para entender la evolución de la concepción moderna de conocimiento experto y de los diferentes problemas que éste plantea a las democracias modernas. Estos problemas giran en torno a las cuestiones de la institucionalización —en concreto, a cómo diseñar instituciones que (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Science, Stories and the Anti-Vaccination Movement.Marcela Veselková - 2014 - Human Affairs 24 (3):287-298.
    This paper discusses the theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the use or non-use of expert-based information in policy-making. Special attention is paid to the Narrative Policy Framework introduced by Jones & McBeth in 2010. This theory of the policy process adopts a quantitative, structuralist and positivist approach to the study of policy narratives. The Narrative Policy Framework is useful for the analysis of the use of expert-based information to resolve so-called wicked problems, which are characterized by intense (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Toolkit for Democratizing Science and Technology Policy: The Practical Mechanics of Organizing a Consensus Conference.Carol Lobes, Judith Adrian, Joshua Grice, Maria Powell & Daniel Lee Kleinman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (2):154-169.
    A widely touted approach to involving laypeople in science and technology policy-related decisions is the consensus conference. Virtually nothing written on the topic provides detailed discussion of the many steps from citizen recruitment to citizen report. Little attention is paid to how and why the mechanics of the consensus conference process might influence the diversity of the participants in theses fora, the quality of the deliberation in the citizen sessions, the experiences of the participants and organizers, and other outcomes that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Illich, Education, and the Human Genome Project: Reflections on Paradoxical Counterproductivity.Jason Scott Robert - 1998 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 18 (4):228-239.
    The Human Genome Project brings genetics and genetic knowledge to the point of paradoxical counterproductivity. Population-wide genetic screens, replacing specific tests intended for and useful to those at risk, become counterproductive when the HGP's "normal human " defines everybody as at risk. More over, the knowledge generated by the HGP disables those whom it is meant to serve: We are rendered impotent as a laity, subject to expertise regarding the truth of our being. The standard response here is that we (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Public Understanding of Science—A Rhetorical Invention.Simon Locke - 2002 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 27 (1):87-111.
    This article contributes to the development of a rhetorical approach to the public understanding of science or science literacy. It is argued that rhetoric promises an alternative approach to deficit models that treat people as faulty scientists. Some tensions in the relevant rhetorical literature need resolution. These center on the application to science of an Aristotelian conception of rhetorical reasoning as enthymematic, without breaking from the Platonic/aristotelian division between technical and public spheres. The former opens science to the potential of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Participatory Approaches in Science and Technology: Historical Origins and Current Practices in Critical Perspective.Martin Lengwiler - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (2):186-200.
    Recent science and technology studies have analyzed questions of nonexpert participation in science, technology, and science policy from an empirically grounded perspective. The introduction to this special issue offers a double contribution to this debate. First, it presents a summary of the state of the art and an outline of the historical emergence of the participatory question. The argument distinguishes four periods since the late nineteenth century, each with a specific relationship between expert and nonexpert knowledge ranging from a hybrid, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Outreaching, Outsourcing, and Disembedding: How Offshore Wind Scientists Consider Their Engagement with Society.Sara Heidenreich - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (3):464-486.
    The role of the individual scientist as a socialization agent is increasingly emphasized in science policy. This article analyzes offshore wind scientists’ narratives about science–technology–society relations and their role in them. It particularly focuses on the nuanced and detailed reasons that scientists give for their level of engagement with society. The analysis is based on semistructured individual and focus group interviews with thirty-five scientists. It finds a diversity of narratives related to the questions of whether socialization of technology is needed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • New Democratic Sciences, Ethics, and Proper Publics.Sara Giordano - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (3):401-430.
    In this article, I examine the rhetoric of democratic science within the field of synthetic biology. The still emerging field of synthetic biology claims to be a new kind of science based on the promises of affordable medicines, environmental bioremediation, and democratic, do-it-yourself science practices. I argue that the formation of a more democratic, DIY portion of this field represents an intervention into ethics debates by becoming “the proper informed public.” Through an analysis of twelve DIY and community-based synthetic biology (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Public Expectations of Gene Therapy: Scientific Futures and Their Performative Effects on Scientific Citizenship.Maja Horst - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (2):150-171.
    The article combines a criticism of public understanding of science with the sociology of expectations to examine how particular expectations toward scientific progress have performative effects for the construction of publics as citizens of science. By analyzing a particular controversy about gene therapy in Denmark, the article demonstrates how different sets of expectations can be used to discriminate among three different assemblages: the assemblage of consumption, the assemblage of comportment, and the assemblage of heroic action. Each of these assemblages makes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Making a Difference: Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and Urban Energy Policies.Simon Marvin, Simon Guy & Robert Evans - 1999 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 24 (1):105-131.
    Infrastructure management has traditionally been based on a logic of predict and provide in which rising demand was met with an increase in infrastructure capacity. However, recent changes in political, economic, and environmental priorities mean that projects such as new roads, which simply expand supply, have become more controversial, and that reducing demand is now a key challenge. This article is about the different ways in which infrastructure managers have tried to achieve reductions in demand, as well as the range (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Paradise Lost? ‘‘Science’’ and ‘‘the Public’’ After Asilomar.Monika Kurath & Priska Gisler - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (2):213-243.
    Scientists continually face public concerns over the potential risks of biotechnology. This article reflects on the 1970s when leading molecular biologists established a moratorium, and initiated the second international Asilomar conference, on recombinant DNA molecules. Since then, this event has been widely perceived as an important historical moment when scientific actors took into account public concerns. Yet, by focusing on the history of the Public Understanding of Science discourse, we gain new insight into how ‘‘science’’ and the ‘‘public’’ have in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Strongly Participatory Science and Knowledge Justice in an Environmentally Contested Region.Barbara L. Allen - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (6):947-971.
    This article draws insights from a case study examining unanswered health questions of residents in two polluted towns in an industrial region in southern France. A participatory health study, as conducted by the author, is presented as a way to address undone science by providing the residents with relevant data supporting their illness claims. Local residents were included in the health survey process, from the formulation of the questions to the final data analysis. Through this strongly participatory science process, the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dazzled by the Mirage of Influence?: STS-SSK in Multivalent Registers of Relevance.Brian Wynne - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (4):491-503.
    Andrew Webster proposes that science and technology studies align itself more thoroughly with practical policy contexts, actors and issues, so as to become more useful, and thus more a regular actor in such worlds. This commentary raises some questions about this approach. First, I note that manifest influence in science or policy or both should not become-by default, or deliberately-a criterion of intellectual quality for STS research work. I distinguish between reflective historical work, which delineates the contingent ways in which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Introduction.Linda L. Layne - 1998 - Science, Technology and Human Values 23 (1):4-23.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Ethical Reflection Must Always Be Measured.Alfred Moore, Sabine Könninger, Svea Luise Herrmann & Kathrin Braun - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (6):839-864.
    The article analyses what we term governmental ethics regimes as forms of scientific governance. Drawing from empirical research on governmental ethics regimes in Germany, Franceand the UK since the early 1980s, it argues that these governmental ethics regimes grew out of the technical model of scientific governance, but have departed from it in crucial ways. It asks whether ethics regimes can be understood as new ‘‘technologies of humility’’ and answers the question with a ‘‘yes, but’’. Yes, governmental ethics regimes have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Speaking Out: Toward an Institutional Agenda for Refashioning STS Scholars as Public Intellectuals.Sharon McKenzie Stevens - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (6):730-753.
    Bijker calls for scholars in science and technology studies to become public intellectuals by actively working toward “democratizing... technological culture.” Many STS scholars have developed practices that support democratic and public activity; yet, these typically require individual commitment with inadequate institutional support. The public work of STS scholars can be better supported through a program that includes using specialist research in nonreproductive educational contexts, redefining and revaluing academic service, developing more accessible ways of writing, and publishing and valuing STS-based texts (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Continuity in Discontinuity: Changing Discourses of Science in a Market Economy.Joanne Duberley, John McAuley & Laurie Cohen - 2001 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 26 (2):145-166.
    There is an emerging consensus that we are experiencing radical change in the way that science is organized and performed. Frequently described as a shift from Mode 1 to Mode 2, this view emphasizes application, transdisciplinarity, collaboration, and accountability. This article examines the ways in which U.K. public sector scientists make sense of scientific endeavor. The data reveal that the extent to which science is being constructed varied both across and between institutions. Data highlight how individual scientists weave their own (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Articulating Scientific Practice with PROTEE: STS, Loyalties, and the Limits of Reflexivity.Ruth McNally & Helena Valve - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (4):470-491.
    Scientific knowledge is the outcome of a collective, for example, of experts, methods, equipment, and experimental sites. The configuration of the collective shapes the scientific findings, allowing some interactions to become visible and meaningful at the expense of others. PROTEE is a methodology that aims to increase the reflexivity of research and innovation projects by helping to sensitize practitioners to the demarcations their projects enact and to think through how these may affect the relevance of the outcomes. We used PROTEE (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Locating Scientific Citizenship: The Institutional Contexts and Cultures of Public Engagement.Nick Pidgeon, Mavis Jones, Irene Lorenzoni & Karen Bickerstaff - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):474-500.
    In this article, we explore the institutional negotiation of public engagement in matters of science and technology. We take the example of the Science in Society dialogue program initiated by the UK’s Royal Society, but set this case within the wider experience of the public engagement activities of a range of charities, corporations, governmental departments, and scientific institutions. The novelty of the analysis lies in the linking of an account of the dialogue event and its outcomes to the values, practices, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Public Knowledge of and Attitudes to Science: Alternative Measures That May End the “Science War”.Pepka Boyadjieva, Kristina Petkova & Martin W. Bauer - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (1):30-51.
    Research on the public understanding of science has measured knowledge as acquaintance with scientific facts and methods and attitudes as evaluations of societal consequences of science and technology. The authors propose alternative concepts and measures: knowledge of the workings of scientific institutions and attitudes to the nature of science. The viability, reliability, and validity of the new measures are demonstrated on British and Bulgarian data. The instrument consists of twenty items and takes ten to fifteen minutes to apply. Differences in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Talking Shops or Talking Turkey?: Institutionalizing Consumer Representation in Risk Regulation.Henry Rothstein - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (5):582-607.
    Participative reforms to risk regulation are often argued to enhance the evidence base, improve the representation of the public interest, and build support for policy processes and outcomes. While rationales and mechanisms for participation have received most scholarly attention, less attention has been paid to the actual impact of participation on policy processes and outcomes. This article, therefore, considers the impacts of participation by examining the UK Food Standards Agency's Consumer Committee, which was created in 2002 to institutionalize consumer representation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Biotechnology Discourse.Bill Doolin - 2007 - Discourse Studies 9 (1):5-8.
    This article analyses the discursive practices of scientists engaged in controversial science in their narrated accounts of encounters with activists. It explores what happens when scientific credibility and authority are challenged in a public debate on the benefits and risks of such science. The aim is to understand how scientists discursively negotiate and make sense of their encounters with activists, the range of subject positions they claim, and how power is implicated in identification with the public. The article shows how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Talking ‘Facts’: Identity and Rationality in Industry Perspectives on Genetic Modification.George Cheney, C. Kay Weaver & Alison Henderson - 2007 - Discourse Studies 9 (1):9-41.
    Despite the potential political impact of industry attempts to influence public policy about genetic modification, little research has focused on critical understanding of industry perspectives. This article explores the rhetorical and discursive construction of public messages about this controversial issue by two major New Zealand export industries. The kiwifruit industry advocates a very cautious public policy position, while the dairy industry has been a strong advocate for the commercial development of genetic modification. We demonstrate that these industries draw on multiple (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Embodied Experience: Representing Risk in Speech and Gesture.Beverly Sauer - 1999 - Discourse Studies 1 (3):321-354.
    This article investigates the ways in which individuals assume two distinct viewpoints in both speech and gesture - both simultaneously and sequentially - when they represent the uncertain knowledge that characterizes risk. In the mimetic viewpoint, individuals represent events as characters in their own narrative or mimic the character viewpoint of an Other. In the analytic viewpoint, individuals move outside of embodied experience to analyze events from a distance. As part of a larger study investigating viewpoint in discourses of risk, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation