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  1. What do our impressions say? The Stoic theory of perceptual content and belief formation.Simon Shogry - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (1):29-63.
    Here I propose an interpretation of the ancient Stoic psychological theory on which (i) the concepts that an adult human possesses affect the content of the perceptual impressions (φαντασίαι αἰσθητικαί) she forms, and (ii) the content of such impressions is exhausted by an ‘assertible’ (ἀξίωμα) of suitable complexity. What leads the Stoics to accept (i) and (ii), I argue, is their theory of assent and belief formation, which requires that the perceptual impression communicate information suitable to serve as the content (...)
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  • The Stoic Appeal to Expertise: Platonic Echoes in the Reply to Indistinguishability.Simon Shogry - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (2):129-159.
    One Stoic response to the skeptical indistinguishability argument is that it fails to account for expertise: the Stoics allow that while two similar objects create indistinguishable appearances in the amateur, this is not true of the expert, whose appearances succeed in discriminating the pair. This paper re-examines the motivations for this Stoic response, and argues that it reveals the Stoic claim that, in generating a kataleptic appearance, the perceiver’s mind is active, insofar as it applies concepts matching the perceptual stimulus. (...)
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  • The Wax and the River Metaphors in Ovid’s Speech of Pythagoras and Plato’s Theaetetus.Peter Kelly - 2019 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 163 (2):274-297.
    In the Speech of Pythagoras fromMetamorphoses15, Ovid uses a metaphor of how wax can be stamped with new images to illustrate how theanimacan remain substantially the same while altering in shape when undergoing transmigration. Shortly after he describes how all things are in a state of flux, and compares the flow of time to the movement of a river. In Plato’sTheaetetus, Socrates, in an extended analogy, tells us to imagine that the ψυχή contains a block of wax, upon which are (...)
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  • The Wax and the River Metaphors in Ovid’s Speech of Pythagoras and Plato’s Theaetetus.Peter Kelly - 2019 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 163 (2):274-297.
    In the Speech of Pythagoras from Metamorphoses 15, Ovid uses a metaphor of how wax can be stamped with new images to illustrate how the anima can remain substantially the same while altering in shape when undergoing transmigration. Shortly after he describes how all things are in a state of flux, and compares the flow of time to the movement of a river. In Plato’s Theaetetus, Socrates, in an extended analogy, tells us to imagine that the ψυχή contains a block (...)
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  • Alexander of Aphrodisias’ Criticism of the Stoic Theory of Perception: typos_ and _typōsis.Attila Hangai - 2022 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 43 (2):339-362.
    The Stoics identified the phantasia with the impression (typos) in the soul, or the impressing process (typōsis). Alexander of Aphrodisias engages directly with this account at De anima 68.10–21, and argues against the applicability of the impression in a theory of perception in Mantissa 10, especially 133.25–134.23. I analyse Alexander’s polemic account at De anima 68.10–21, I demonstrate that it differs from Chrysippus’ criticism of Cleanthes (contrary to some commentators), and I show how it fits in the context of his (...)
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  • Plotinus' Account of the Cognitive Powers of the Soul: Sense Perception and Discursive Thought. [REVIEW]Riccardo Chiaradonna - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):191-207.
    This paper focuses on Plotinus’ account of the soul’s cognitive powers of sense perception and discursive thought, with particular reference to the treatises 3. 6 [26], 4. 4 [28] and 5. 3 [49] of the Enneads . Part 1 of the paper discusses Plotinus’ direct realism in perception. Parts 2 and 3 focus on Plotinus’ account of knowledge in Enneads 5. 3 [49] 2–3. Plotinus there argues that we make judgements regarding how the external world is by means of discursive (...)
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  • Why Children, Parrots, and Actors Cannot Speak: The Stoics on Genuine and Superficial Speech.Sosseh Assaturian - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):1-34.
    At Varro LL VI.56 and SE M 8.275-276, we find reports of the Stoic view that children and articulate non-rational animals such as parrots cannot genuinely speak. Absent from these testimonia is the peculiar case of the superficiality of the actor’s speech, which appears in one edition of the unstable text of PHerc 307.9 containing fragments of Chrysippus’ Logical Investigations. Commentators who include this edition of the text in their discussions of the Stoic theory of speech do not offer a (...)
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  • Asentimiento y “lo que depende de nosotros”: dos argumentos compatibilistas en el estoicismo antiguo.Rodrigo Sebastián Braicovich - 2008 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 33 (2):131-160.
    El objetivo de este artículo es analizar dos argumentos estoicos (uno de ellos transmitido por Cicerón y Aulo Gelio, el otro por Nemesio y Alejandro) que han sido frecuentemente interpretados como una defensa del compatibilismo. Presentaremos una interpretación alternativa de ambos argumentos, concentrándonos en el horizonte naturalista ofrecido por la metafísica y la ética del estoicismo antiguo. El análisis se articulará sobre el concepto de “asentimiento” y sobre la distinción entre aquello que “depende de nosotros” y aquello que no.
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  • Gnoseología y determinismo en la Estoa antigua: ¿en qué sentido el sabio es capaz de controlar sus asentimientos?Natacha Bustos - 2012 - Argos (Universidad Simón Bolívar) 35 (2):60-74.
    El presente trabajo se propone advertir el momento del proceso cognitivo en el cual la habilidad del sabio de controlar sus asentimientos se haría manifiesta; dicho propósito presenta ciertas dificultades dado el marco de un determinismo radical que caracteriza al pensamiento estoico. Por tanto, y con el objetivo de dilucidar tales problemáticas, conjugaremos la existencia de una cadena de determinaciones (que constituye el destino) con la posibilidad de que un individuo cuente con una facultad que 'esté en su poder'. The (...)
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