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  1. Ethical Aspects of Vulnerability in Research.Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):157-162.
    In connection with research on humans, the term “vulnerability” is only appropriate to identify the special need for protection of certain sections of the population and individuals, if this term refers to the additional risk of certain groups of subjects. Authors who focus on the additional risk suffering of a subject group when defining vulnerability succeed in considering the specific worthiness of protection in a context-sensitive way. The attempt to define the risk–benefit assessment for vulnerable subject groups on a binding (...)
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  • Vulnerability, Insecurity and the Pathologies of Trust and Distrust.Catriona Mackenzie - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies:624-643.
    While some trust theorists have adverted to the vulnerabilities involved in trust, especially vulnerability to betrayal, the literature on trust has not engaged with recent work on the ethics of vulnerability. This paper initiates a dialogue between these literatures, and in doing so begins to explore the complex interrelations between vulnerability and trust. More specifically, it aims to show how trust can both mitigate and compound vulnerability. Through a discussion of two examples drawn from literary sources, the paper also investigates (...)
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  • Health Within Illness: The Negativity of Vulnerability Revised.Ivana Zagorac & Barbara Stamenković Tadić - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (2):207-217.
    This paper attempts to philosophically articulate empirical evidence on the positive effects of illness within the wider context of a discussion of the positive aspects of vulnerability. The conventional understanding holds that to be vulnerable is to be open to harms and wrongs; it is to be fragile, defenseless, and of compromised autonomy. In this paper, we challenge the assumption that vulnerability consists of nothing but powerlessness and dependence on others. This paper attempts to: outline the theoretical conceptualisation of the (...)
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  • Vulnerability as a Key Concept in Relational Patient- Centered Professionalism.Janet Delgado - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (2):155-172.
    The goal of this paper is to propose a relational turn in healthcare professionalism, to improve the responsiveness of both healthcare professionals and organizations towards care of patients, but also professionals. To this end, it is important to stress the way in which difficult situations and vulnerability faced by professionals can have an impact on their performance of work. This article pursue two objectives. First, I focus on understanding and making visible shared vulnerability that arises in clinical settings from a (...)
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  • Psychosis, Vulnerability, and the Moral Significance of Biomedical Innovation in Psychiatry. Why Ethicists Should Join Efforts.Paolo Corsico - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):269-279.
    The study of the neuroscience and genomics of mental illness are increasingly intertwined. This is mostly due to the translation of medical technologies into psychiatry and to technological convergence. This article focuses on psychosis. I argue that the convergence of neuroscience and genomics in the context of psychosis is morally problematic, and that ethics scholarship should go beyond the identification of a number of ethical, legal, and social issues. My argument is composed of two strands. First, I argue that we (...)
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  • Do We Have a Moral Responsibility to Compensate for Vulnerable Groups? A Discussion on the Right to Health for LGBT People.Perihan Elif Ekmekci - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):335-341.
    Vulnerability is a broad concept widely addressed in recent scholarly literature. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are among the vulnerable populations with significant disadvantages related to health and the social determinants of health. Medical ethics discourse tackles vulnerability from philosophical and political perspectives. LGBT people experience several disadvantages from both perspectives. This article aims to justify the right to health for LGBT people and their particular claims regarding healthcare because they belong to a vulnerable group. Rawls’ theory of justice (...)
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  • Body Matters: Rethinking the Ethical Acceptability of Non-Beneficial Clinical Research with Children.Eva De Clercq, Domnita Oana Badarau, Katharina M. Ruhe & Tenzin Wangmo - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):421-431.
    The involvement of children in non-beneficial clinical research is extremely important for improving pediatric care, but its ethical acceptability is still disputed. Therefore, various pro-research justifications have been proposed throughout the years. The present essay aims at contributing to the on-going discussion surrounding children’s participation in non-beneficial clinical research. Building on Wendler’s ‘contribution to a valuable project’ justification, but going beyond a risk/benefit analysis, it articulates a pro-research argument which appeals to a phenomenological view on the body and vulnerability. It (...)
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  • Can Our Understanding of Informed Consent Be Strengthened Using the Idea of Cluster Concepts?Wayne Xavier Shandera - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):679-682.
    Informed consent is thought to exist as a well-defined entity. Altered concepts of patient autonomy, differential cultural understanding of the entity, and the failure of clients to distinguish between research and clinical ethics, and various hierarchical cultural views of informed consent all suggest that alterations may be needed in the traditional concept. By using the methodology outlined by Gasking in which he defines the idea of “cluster concepts,” one may be able to enlarge the definition and augment the understanding of (...)
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  • Ethical Considerations for HIV Remission Clinical Research Involving Participants Diagnosed During Acute HIV Infection.Stuart Rennie, Maartje Dijkstra, Karine Dubé, Joseph D. Tucker & Adam Gilbertson - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    HIV remission clinical researchers are increasingly seeking study participants who are diagnosed and treated during acute HIV infection—the brief period between infection and the point when the body creates detectable HIV antibodies. This earliest stage of infection is often marked by flu-like illness and may be an especially tumultuous period of confusion, guilt, anger, and uncertainty. Such experiences may present added ethical challenges for HIV research recruitment, participation, and retention. The purpose of this paper is to identify potential ethical challenges (...)
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  • The Concept of Vulnerability in Medical Ethics and Philosophy.Joachim Boldt - 2019 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 14 (1):1-8.
    Healthcare is permeated by phenomena of vulnerability and their ethical significance. Nonetheless, application of this concept in healthcare ethics today is largely confined to clinical research. Approaches that further elaborate the concept in order to make it suitable for healthcare as a whole thus deserve renewed attention. Conceptual analysis. Taking up the task to make the concept of vulnerability suitable for healthcare ethics as a whole involves two challenges. Firstly, starting from the concept as it used in research ethics, a (...)
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  • Ethical Values and Principles to Guide the Fair Allocation of Resources in Response to a Pandemic: A Rapid Systematic Review.Áine Carroll, Cliona McGovern, Maeve Nolan, Áine O’Brien, Edelweiss Aldasoro & Lydia O’Sullivan - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundThe coronavirus 2019 pandemic placed unprecedented pressures on healthcare services and magnified ethical dilemmas related to how resources should be allocated. These resources include, among others, personal protective equipment, personnel, life-saving equipment, and vaccines. Decision-makers have therefore sought ethical decision-making tools so that resources are distributed both swiftly and equitably. To support the development of such a decision-making tool, a systematic review of the literature on relevant ethical values and principles was undertaken. The aim of this review was to identify (...)
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  • The Concept of Vulnerability in Aged Care: A Systematic Review of Argument-Based Ethics Literature.Chris Gastmans, Roberta Sala & Virginia Sanchini - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundVulnerability is a key concept in traditional and contemporary bioethics. In the philosophical literature, vulnerability is understood not only to be an ontological condition of humanity, but also to be a consequence of contingent factors. Within bioethics debates, vulnerable populations are defined in relation to compromised capacity to consent, increased susceptibility to harm, and/or exploitation. Although vulnerability has historically been associated with older adults, to date, no comprehensive or systematic work exists on the meaning of their vulnerability. To fill this (...)
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  • The Enabling Value of Group Vulnerability.Fabio Macioce - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory.
    The notion of vulnerable groups has gained relevance in international legal instruments while being criticised in philosophical literature for its disabling potential and disempowering consequences. The article argues that the category of group vulnerability should not be abandoned, being an opportunity for resistance, visibility, and a place for dissent: vulnerable groups can both function as a sounding board for claims and make demands for recognition, resetting the political agenda and the topics of public debate, and allow the level of collective (...)
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  • Community-Level Vulnerabilities and Political Field Experiments.Cara Evans - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 5 (1).
    Most research ethics literature on vulnerability focuses on the vulnerability of individuals and populations defined by the potential vulnerability of their members. However, research involving human participants does not always take the individual as the unit of analysis: political experiments may apply an intervention to a community as a whole. This paper argues that community-level vulnerability is not reducible to the sum of the vulnerabilities of community members, and that there is thus a need to consider vulnerability at the community (...)
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  • Motives and Risk Perceptions of Participants in a Phase 1 Trial for Hepatitis C Virus Investigational Therapy in Pregnancy.Yasaswi Kislovskiy, Catherine Chappell, Emily Flaherty, Megan E. Hamm, Flor de Abril Cameron, Elizabeth Krans & Judy C. Chang - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (2):132-150.
    Limited research has been done among pregnant people participating in investigational drug trials. To enhance the ethical understanding of pregnant people’s perspectives on research participation, we sought to describe motives and risk perceptions of participants in a phase 1 trial of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir treatment for chronic Hepatitis C virus during pregnancy. Pregnant people with chronic HCV infection enrolled in an open-label, phase 1 study of LDV/SOF participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews to explore their reasons for participation and experiences within the study. (...)
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  • Benefit Sharing – From Biodiversity to Human Genetics.Doris Schroeder & Julie Cook Lucas (eds.) - 2013 - Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.
    Biomedical research is increasingly carried out in low- and middle-income countries. International consensus has largely been achieved around the importance of valid consent and protecting research participants from harm. But what are the responsibilities of researchers and funders to share the benefits of their research with research participants and their communities? After setting out the legal, ethical and conceptual frameworks for benefit sharing, this collection analyses seven historical cases to identify the ethical and policy challenges that arise in relation to (...)
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  • Vulnerability, Health, and Illness.Robyn Bluhm - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):147-161.
    Although it is intuitively obvious that having health problems makes people vulnerable, neither bioethics nor the philosophy of medicine has paid much attention to the relationship between vulnerability and health or illness. In this paper, I draw on work by Erinn Gilson on the nature of vulnerability in order to address this lack, showing that attending to vulnerability illuminates the relationship between health and illness.
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  • How Are Pregnant Women Vulnerable Research Participants?Verina Wild - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):82-104.
    Despite the attempts to promote the inclusion of pregnant women into clinical research, this group is still widely excluded. An analysis of the “vulnerability of pregnant women” that questions deeply internalized stereotypes is necessary for finding the right balance in the protection of pregnant women as research participants. Criticism of the traditional account of vulnerability will lead to an alternative that focuses on situations rather than groups and on the obligations of responsible parties. The paper adds to the current general (...)
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  • Vulnerability and Exploitation in a Globalized World.Agomoni Ganguli Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):91-102.
    Bioethics has changed considerably over the last few years. Increased global interaction, through the off-shoring of clinical trials, cross-border surrogacy, organ trafficking, and medical tourism, among others practices, has brought additional considerations to a discipline that has been, until recently, relatively contained within national borders. We aim to contribute to the discourse on exploitation and vulnerability in a way that reflects such global changes. We will explore the link between vulnerability and exploitation, and argue that exploitation can be understood as (...)
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  • Why Bioethics Needs a Concept of Vulnerability.Wendy Rogers, Catriona Mackenzie & Susan Dodds - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):11-38.
    Concern for human vulnerability seems to be at the heart of bioethical inquiry, but the concept of vulnerability is under-theorized in the bioethical literature. The aim of this article is to show why bioethics needs an adequately theorized and nuanced conception of vulnerability. We first review approaches to vulnerability in research ethics and public health ethics, and show that the bioethical literature associates vulnerability with risk of harm and exploitation, and limited capacity for autonomy. We identify some of the challenges (...)
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  • Contrasting Medical Technology with Deprivation and Social Vulnerability. Lessons for the Ethical Debate on Cloning and Organ Transplantation Through the Film Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (3):245-256.
    In the film Never Let Me Go, clones are forced to donate their organs anonymously. As a work of fiction, this film can be regarded as a negotiation of limited agency, since the clones are depicted as vulnerable individuals. Thereby, it evokes a confrontation with underprivileged positions in technocratic societies, encouraging the audience to take the perspective of the marginalised. The clones are situated in ‘privileged deprivation’; from the audience’s point of view, they are unable to evolve into autonomous agents—but (...)
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  • The Clinical Investigator-Subject Relationship: A Contextual Approach.David B. Resnik - 2009 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4:16-.
    BackgroundThe nature of the relationship between a clinical investigator and a research subject has generated considerable debate because the investigator occupies two distinct roles: clinician and scientist. As a clinician, the investigator has duties to provide the patient with optimal care and undivided loyalty. As a scientist, the investigator has duties to follow the rules, procedures and methods described in the protocol.Results and conclusionIn this article, I present a contextual approach to the investigator-subject relationship. The extent of the investigator's duty (...)
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  • Motives and Risk Perceptions of Participants in a Phase 1 Trial for Hepatitis C Virus Investigational Therapy in Pregnancy.Yasaswi Kislovskiy, Catherine Chappell, Emily Flaherty, Megan E. Hamm, Flor de Abril Cameron, Elizabeth Krans & Judy C. Chang - 2021 - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics 18 (2):132-150.
    Research Ethics, Volume 18, Issue 2, Page 132-150, April 2022. Limited research has been done among pregnant people participating in investigational drug trials. To enhance the ethical understanding of pregnant people’s perspectives on research participation, we sought to describe motives and risk perceptions of participants in a phase 1 trial of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir treatment for chronic Hepatitis C virus during pregnancy. Pregnant people with chronic HCV infection enrolled in an open-label, phase 1 study of LDV/SOF participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews to (...)
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries: On Social Harms, Big Tech, and Institutional Accountability.James A. Anderson, Melissa D. McCradden & Elizabeth A. Stephenson - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-3.
    The authors offer their sincere thanks to all of the commentators for taking the time to comment on our work ; one of the advantages of the AJOB format is immediate feedback,...
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  • IRBs and the Protection-Inclusion Dilemma: Finding a Balance.Phoebe Friesen, Luke Gelinas, Aaron Kirby, David H. Strauss & Barbara E. Bierer - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-14.
    Institutional review boards, tasked with facilitating ethical research, are often pulled in competing directions. In what we call the protection-inclusion dilemma, we acknowledge the tensions IRBs...
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  • „Wir wissen es alle, nur sprechen wir es nie aus.“: Institutionalisierte Uninformiertheit als Bedingung von Vulnerabilität beim Klonen und Organspende in Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):23-34.
    ZusammenfassungIm Spielfilm Never Let Me Go werden Klone als vulnerable und heteronome Individuen dargestellt, die zur anonymen Organspende gezwungen werden. In diesem Beitrag wird die Darstellung dieser Figuren in ihrer individuellen Entwicklung und gesellschaftlichen Sozialisation unter der Frage untersucht, welche Bezüge sich zu bioethischen Aspekten ergeben. Die Klone befinden sich in einer Situation der „privilegierten Deprivation“: Aus Sicht der Zuschauer sind sie sozial benachteiligt und können sich nicht zu komplett autonomen Wesen entwickeln, aber aus ihrer eigenen Perspektive sind sie im (...)
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  • The Perils of Protection: Vulnerability and Women in Clinical Research.Toby Schonfeld - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (3):189-206.
    Subpart B of 45 Code of Federal Regulations Part 46 (CFR) identifies the criteria according to which research involving pregnant women, human fetuses, and neonates can be conducted ethically in the United States. As such, pregnant women and fetuses fall into a category requiring “additional protections,” often referred to as “vulnerable populations.” The CFR does not define vulnerability, but merely gives examples of vulnerable groups by pointing to different categories of potential research subjects needing additional protections. In this paper, I (...)
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  • Structural Health Vulnerability: Health Inequalities, Structural and Epistemic Injustice.Ryoa Chung - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (2):201-216.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  • Abuses and Apologies: Irresponsible Conduct of Human Subjects Research in Latin America.Julie M. Aultman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):353-368.
    This paper explores the vulnerability of Latin American human subjects, and how their vulnerability is ignored due to the complexities and inconsistencies of oversight committees and institutional policies. Secondly, the concept of apology is examined and its meaning to victims of past research abuses.
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  • Why Physicians Ought to Lie for Their Patients.Nicolas Tavaglione & Samia Hurst - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):4-12.
    Sometimes physicians lie to third-party payers in order to grant their patients treatment they would otherwise not receive. This strategy, commonly known as gaming the system, is generally condemned for three reasons. First, it may hurt the patient for the sake of whom gaming was intended. Second, it may hurt other patients. Third, it offends contractual and distributive justice. Hence, gaming is considered to be immoral behavior. This article is an attempt to show that, on the contrary, gaming may sometimes (...)
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  • Instrumentalist Analyses of the Functions of Ethics Concept-Principles: A Proposal for Synergetic Empirical and Conceptual Enrichment.Eric Racine, M. Ariel Cascio, Marjorie Montreuil & Aline Bogossian - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (4):253-278.
    Bioethics has made a compelling case for the role of experience and empirical research in ethics. This may explain why the movement for empirical ethics has such a firm grounding in bioethics. However, the theoretical framework according to which empirical research contributes to ethics—and the specific role it can or should play—remains manifold and unclear. In this paper, we build from pragmatic theory stressing the importance of experience and outcomes in establishing the meaning of ethics concepts. We then propose three (...)
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  • Family Vulnerability for Sick Older Adults: An Empirical Ethics Study.Xiang Zou & Jing-Bao Nie - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302096485.
    Background: In China, the conventional family-based ageing care model is under pressure from social transitions, raising the question of whether and to what extent families are still capable of dealing with the care of the aged. Objective: This article examines the vulnerability and inadequacy of families to bear responsibility for the care of the aged against a backdrop of socioeconomic transformation and diminishing institutional support in rural China. Research design: This article adopts an empirical ethical approach that integrates empirical investigation (...)
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  • Abuses and Apologies: Irresponsible Conduct of Human Subjects Research in Latin America.Julie M. Aultman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):353-368.
    As much as we can be squeamish and angry over what was being done in these studies, they force us to consider how we tell these stories and the policy we make now, as so much of our research is global and the risks and benefits of experimentation always in need of recalibration.Susan M. ReverbyA growing distrust exists among Latin American populations as past abuses in medical research have rightly been publicized, and as researchers continue to intentionally and unintentionally circumvent (...)
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  • Vulnerability as a Regulatory Category in Human Subject Research.Carl H. Coleman - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):12-18.
    The concept of vulnerability has long played a central role in discussions of research ethics. In addition to its rhetorical use, vulnerability has become a term of art in U.S. and international research regulations and guidelines, many of which contain specific provisions applicable to research with vulnerable subjects. Yet, despite the frequency with which the term vulnerability is used, little consensus exists on what it actually means in the context of human subject protection or, more importantly, on how a finding (...)
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  • Vulnerability as a Regulatory Category in Human Subject Research.Carl H. Coleman - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):12-18.
    This article examines and critiques the use of the term “vulnerability” in U.S. and international regulations and guidelines on research ethics. After concluding that the term is currently used in multiple, often inconsistent, senses, it calls on regulators to differentiate between three distinct types of vulnerability: “consent-based vulnerability,”“risk-based vulnerability,” and “justice-based vulnerability.”.
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  • A Matter of Heart: Beyond Informed Consent.Haavi Morreim - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):18-20.
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  • Instrumentalist Analyses of the Functions of Health Ethics Concepts and Principles: Methodological Guideposts.Eric Racine, M. Ariel Cascio & Aline Bogossian - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):16-18.
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  • 'Vulnerability', an Interesting Concept for Public Health: The Case of Older Persons.Florencia Luna - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):180-194.
    Traditional accounts of vulnerability tend to label entire populations as vulnerable. This approach is of limited utility. Instead, this article utilizes a layered approach to vulnerability, identifying multiple vulnerabilities that older people experience. It focuses on distinguishing the different layers of vulnerability that may be experienced by the elderly in middle-income countries of Latin America. In doing so, I show how the layered approach to vulnerability functions, and demonstrate why it is more interesting and useful than the traditional approach. The (...)
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  • Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers.Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, sanitation, (...)
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  • Vulnerability and Exploitation in a Globalized World.Agomoni Ganguli Mitra & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):91-102.
    Concerns arising from global sociopolitical differences, and increasing economic and health disparities, have brought new considerations to the field of bioethics, both in terms of applications and to foundational concepts such as exploitation and vulnerability.In this paper, we aim to contribute to the discourse on exploitation and vulnerability in a way that reflects such global changes. We will explore the link between vulnerability and exploitation, and argue that exploitation can be understood as taking advantage of vulnerabilities, provided we recognize that (...)
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  • Denying Assisted Dying Where Death is Not ‘Reasonably Foreseeable’: Intolerable Overgeneralization in Canadian End-of-Life Law.Kevin Reel - unknown
    The recent change in Canadian law to allow access to medical assistance in dying restricts eligibility, among its other criteria, to those for whom “natural death has become reasonably foreseeable.” A recent review of certain aspects of the law examined the evidence pertaining to extending access to assisted dying in three particular request situations currently denied: requests by mature minors, advance requests, and requests where mental illness is the sole underlying medical condition [1]. The requirement for this review was included (...)
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  • Vulnerability Identified in Clinical Practice: A Qualitative Analysis.Laura Sossauer, Mélinée Schindler & Samia Hurst - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-10.
    Background Although it is the moral duty of physicians to protect vulnerable patients, there are no data on how vulnerability is perceived in clinical practice. This study explores how physicians classify someone as “vulnerable”. Method Thirty-three physicians were initially questioned about resource allocation problems in their work. The results of these interviews were examined with qualitative study software to identify characteristics associated with vulnerability in patients. Data were conceptualized, classified and cross-linked to highlight the major determinants of vulnerability. The findings (...)
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  • Ethical Considerations for Epidemic Vaccine Trials.Joshua Teperowski Monrad - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):465-469.
    Vaccines are a powerful measure to protect the health of individuals and to combat outbreaks such as the COVID-19 pandemic. An ethical dilemma arises when one effective vaccine has been successfully developed against an epidemic disease and researchers seek to test the efficacy of another vaccine for the same pathogen in clinical trials involving human subjects. On the one hand, there are compelling reasons why it would be unethical to trial a novel vaccine when an effective product exists already. First, (...)
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  • Ethical Issues Raised by Cluster Randomised Trials Conducted in Low-Resource Settings: Identifying Gaps in the Ottawa Statement Through an Analysis of the PURE Malawi Trial.Tiwonge K. Mtande, Charles Weijer, Mina C. Hosseinipour, Monica Taljaard, Mitch Matoga, Cory E. Goldstein, Billy Nyambalo & Nora E. Rosenberg - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):388-393.
    The increasing use of cluster randomised trials in low-resource settings raises unique ethical issues. The Ottawa Statement on the Ethical Design and Conduct of Cluster Randomised Trials is the first international ethical guidance document specific to cluster trials, but it is unknown if it adequately addresses issues in low-resource settings. In this paper, we seek to identify any gaps in the Ottawa Statement relevant to cluster trials conducted in low-resource settings. Our method is to analyse a prototypical cluster trial conducted (...)
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  • Vulnerability of Pregnant Women in Clinical Research.Indira S. E. van der Zande, Rieke van der Graaf, Martijn A. Oudijk & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):657-663.
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  • Ethical Questions Identified in a Study of Local and Expatriate Responders’ Perspectives of Vulnerability in the 2010 Haiti Earthquake.Evelyne Durocher, Ryoa Chung, Christiane Rochon, Jean-Hugues Henrys, Catherine Olivier & Matthew Hunt - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (9):613-617.
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  • Research in Disaster Settings: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Ethical Guidelines.Signe Mezinska, Péter Kakuk, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligóra & Dónal P. O’Mathúna - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):62.
    Conducting research during or in the aftermath of disasters poses many specific practical and ethical challenges. This is particularly the case with research involving human subjects. The extraordinary circumstances of research conducted in disaster settings require appropriate regulations to ensure the protection of human participants. The goal of this study is to systematically and qualitatively review the existing ethical guidelines for disaster research by using the constant comparative method. We performed a systematic qualitative review of disaster research ethics guidelines to (...)
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  • Health Without Care? Vulnerability, Medical Brain Drain, and Health Worker Responsibilities in Underserved Contexts.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):17-32.
    There is a consensus that the effects of medical brain drain, especially in the Sub-Saharan African countries, ought to be perceived as more than a simple misfortune. Temporary restrictions on the emigration of health workers from the region is one of the already existing policy measures to tackle the issue—while such a restrictive measure brings about the need for quite a justificatory work. A recent normative contribution to the debate by Gillian Brock provides a fruitful starting point. In the first (...)
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  • Vulnerability as a Concept for Health Systems Research.Margaret Meek Lange - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):41-43.
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  • Beyond the Framework.Marianne L. Burda - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):11 - 13.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 11-13, January 2012.
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