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  1. Negotiating Options in Weight-Loss Surgery: “Actually I Didn't Have Any Other Option”.Karen Synne Groven & Gunn Engelsrud - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):361-370.
    In this study we explore how a selection of Norwegian women account for their decision to undergo weight loss surgery. We argue that women’s descriptions of their experiences leading up to this choice of action illuminate issues regarding social norms of bodily appearance and personal responsibility. The starting point is women’s own experiences within a cultural context in which opting for WLS often attracts moral scrutiny. Inspired by Merleau-Ponty’s notion of consciousness as embodied and de Beauvoir’s ideas concerning women’s situation, (...)
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  • Evidens, estetikk og etikk.Bjørn Hofmann - 2022 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1:33-52.
    Helsevesenet har blitt en sentral samfunnsaktør og medisinen dets førende fag. Hvorfor har det blitt slik? En grunn er at medisinen fører sammen sfærer som ellers har vært adskilt: det sanne, det gode og det skjønne. Medisinen som fag og helsevesenet som institusjon, har blitt et fascinerende skjæringspunkt nettopp mellom evidens, etikk og estetikk. Her kobles kunnskap til det som er vondt og skjønnhet til det som er friskt. Kunnskapsproduksjonen dirigeres ut fra ønsket om å gjøre det gode ved å (...)
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  • How Medical Technologies Shape the Experience of Illness.Bjørn Hofmann & Fredrik Svenaeus - unknown
    In this article we explore how diagnostic and therapeutic technologies shape the lived experiences of illness for patients. By analysing a wide range of examples, we identify six ways that technology can form the experience of illness. First, technology may create awareness of disease by revealing asymptomatic signs or markers. Second, the technology can reveal risk factors for developing diseases. Third, the technology can affect and change an already present illness experience. Fourth, therapeutic technologies may redefine our experiences of a (...)
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  • Lifestyle-Related Diseases and Individual Responsibility Through the Prism of Solidarity.Alena Buyx & Barbara Prainsack - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (2):79-85.
    The concept of lifestyle-related diseases and individual responsibility for health has played an important role in debates on the fair allocation of increasingly scarce health-care resources. In this article, we examine this discussion through the prism of solidarity. Based on an understanding of solidarity as shared practices reflecting a collective commitment to carry ‘costs’ (financial, social, emotional or otherwise) to assist others, we analyse frequent arguments in the debate and, in particular, the tool of risk-stratification. We then offer a solidarity-based (...)
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  • Ethical analysis in HTA of complex health interventions.Kristin Bakke Lysdahl, Wija Oortwijn, Gert Jan van der Wilt, Pietro Refolo, Dario Sacchini, Kati Mozygemba, Ansgar Gerhardus, Louise Brereton & Bjørn Hofmann - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    In the field of health technology assessment, there are several approaches that can be used for ethical analysis. However, there is a scarcity of literature that critically evaluates and compares the strength and weaknesses of these approaches when they are applied in practice. In this paper, we analyse the applicability of some selected approaches for addressing ethical issues in HTA in the field of complex health interventions. Complex health interventions have been the focus of methodological attention in HTA. However, the (...)
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  • Why We Never Eat Alone: The Overlooked Role of Microbes and Partners in Obesity Debates in Bioethics.Nicolae Morar & Joshua August Skorburg - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):435-448.
    Debates about obesity in bioethics tend to unfold in predictable epicycles between individual choices and behaviours and the oppressive socio-economic structures constraining them. Here, we argue that recent work from two cutting-edge research programmes in microbiology and social psychology can advance this conceptual stalemate in the literature. We begin in section 1 by discussing two promising lines of obesity research involving the human microbiome and relationship partners. Then, in section 2, we show how this research has made viable novel strategies (...)
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  • Obesity as a Socially Defined Disease: Philosophical Considerations and Implications for Policy and Care.Bjørn Hofmann - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):86-100.
    Obesity has generated significant worries amongst health policy makers and has obtained increased attention in health care. Obesity is unanimously defined as a disease in the health care and health policy literature. However, there are pragmatic and not principled reasons for this. This warrants an analysis of obesity according to standard conceptions of disease in the literature of philosophy of medicine. According to theories and definitions of disease referring to internal processes, obesity is not a disease. Obesity undoubtedly can result (...)
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  • The Controversy Over Pediatric Bariatric Surgery: An Explorative Study on Attitudes and Normative Beliefs of Specialists, Parents, and Adolescents With Obesity.Stefan M. van Geelen, Ineke L. E. Bolt, Olga H. van der Baan-Slootweg & Marieke J. H. van Summeren - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):227-237.
    Despite the reported limited success of conventional treatments and growing evidence of the effectiveness of adult bariatric surgery, weight loss operations for (morbidly) obese children and adolescents are still considered to be controversial by health care professionals and lay people alike. This paper describes an explorative, qualitative study involving obesity specialists, morbidly obese adolescents, and parents and identifies attitudes and normative beliefs regarding pediatric bariatric surgery. Views on the etiology of obesity—whether it should be considered primarily a medical condition or (...)
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  • Why Bariatric Surgery Should Be Given High Priority: An Argument From Law and Morality.Karl Persson - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (4):305-324.
    In recent years, bariatric surgery has become an increasingly popular treatment of obesity. The amount of resources spent on this kind of surgery has led to a heated debate among health care professionals and the general public, as each procedure costs at minimum $14,500 and thousands of patients undergo surgery every year. So far, no substantial argument for or against giving this treatment a high priority has, however, been presented. In this article, I argue that regardless which moral perspective we (...)
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  • Bariatric Surgery for Obese Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Moral Challenges. [REVIEW]Bjørn Hofmann - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):18.
    BackgroundBariatric surgery for children and adolescents is becoming widespread. However, the evidence is still scarce and of poor quality, and many of the patients are too young to consent. This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic) approach is applied to reveal underlying moral issues that can be relevant to an open and transparent (...)
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  • Don't Let Them Eat Cake! A View From Across the Pond.Robin Mackenzie - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):16-18.
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  • The Encompassing Ethics of Bariatric Surgery.Bjørn Hofmann - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):W1-W2.
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  • Bariatric Surgery, Ethical Obligation, and the Life Cycle of Medical Innovation.Kenneth De Ville - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):22-24.
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  • Stuck in the Middle: What Should a Good Society Do?John Z. Sadler, Nancy Puzziferri & Anna R. Brandon - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):18-20.
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  • Pondering the Ponderous: Are the “Moral Challenges” of Bariatric Surgery Morally Challenged?Sabrina Koperski & Beatrice A. Golomb - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):24-26.
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  • Parsing Neurobiological Dysfunctions in Obesity: Nosologic and Ethical Consequences.Paul S. Appelbaum, Michael J. Devlin & Carl E. Fisher - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):14-16.
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  • Exceptionalism Denied: Obesity Does Not Negate the Ability to Give Informed Consent.Rachel Zuraw - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):27-28.
  • Bariatric Surgery and the Social Character of the Obesity Epidemic.Jeremy R. Garrett & Leslie Ann McNolty - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):20-22.
  • Medical Tourism and Bariatric Surgery: More Moral Challenges.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):28-30.
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  • Moral Aspects of Bariatric Surgery for Obese Children and Adolescents: The Urgent Need for Empirical–Ethical Research.S. M. van Geelen, L. L. E. Bolt & M. J. H. van Summeren - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):30-32.
  • The Problem of Obesity: How Are We Going To Address It?Michael G. Sarr - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):12-13.