Switch to: References

Citations of:

Plato on the Metaphysical Foundation of Meaning and Truth

Cambridge University Press (2016)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. A Interpretação Aristotélica do Pensamento Protagoreano em MetafísicaΓ4-6.Anderson Borges - 2017 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):82-105.
    In Metaphysics Γ 4-6 Aristotle argues that Protagoras is committed not just to denying the PNC, but also to asserting its contrary. In this paper, I offer an analysis of this commitment. I try to show that Aristotle is working with a specific idea in mind: a Protagoreanism ontologically linked to the flux doctrine, as Plato suggested in Theaetetus 152-160.
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Knowledge and Truth in the Greatest Difficulty Argument: Parmenides 133b4–134b5.Gail Fine - 2020 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 10 (3-4):209-234.
    One of Plato’s central tenets is that we can know forms. In Parmenides 133b4–134b5, Plato presents an argument whose sceptical conclusion is that we can’t know forms. Although he indicates that the argument doesn’t succeed, he also says it’s difficult to explain how it fails. Commentators have suggested a variety of flaws. I argue that the argument can be defended against some, though not all, of the alleged flaws. But I also argue that Plato hints at a crucial distinction that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Between Truth and Meaning. A Novel Interpretation of the Symploke in Plato’s Sophist.Lorenzo Giovannetti - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (2):261-290.
    In this paper, I provide an interpretation of the symploke ton eidon at Soph. 259e. My goal is to show that the specific metaphysical view expressed by the interweaving of forms best accounts for Plato’s explanation of truth and falsehood. In the first section, I introduce the fundamentals of the interpretation of the greatest kinds and their functions. After that, I propose an interpretation of the assertion at 259e, the upshot of which is that the interweaving of forms only deals (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Eleaticism and Socratic Dialectic: On Ontology, Philosophical Inquiry, and Estimations of Worth in Plato’s Parmenides, Sophist and Statesman.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2019 - Études Platoniciennes 19 (19).
    The Parmenides poses the question for what entities there are Forms, and the criticism of Forms it contains is commonly supposed to document an ontological reorientation in Plato. According to this reading, Forms no longer express the excellence of a given entity and a Socratic, ethical perspective on life, but come to resemble concepts, or what concepts designate, and are meant to explain nature as a whole. Plato’s conception of dialectic, it is further suggested, consequently changes into a value-neutral method (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Socrates and Plato.Alex Long - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (3):351-358.
  • ‘Pushing Through’ in Plato’s Sophist: A New Reading of the Parity Assumption.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):159-188.
    At a crucial juncture in Plato’s Sophist, when the interlocutors have reached their deepest confusion about being and not-being, the Eleatic Visitor proclaims that there is yet hope. Insofar as they clarify one, he maintains, they will equally clarify the other. But what justifies the Visitor’s seemingly oracular prediction? A new interpretation explains how the Visitor’s hope is in fact warranted by the peculiar aporia they find themselves in. The passage describes a broader pattern of ‘exploring both sides’ that lends (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conceptions of Truth in Plato’s Sophist.Michail Peramatzis - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):333-378.
    The paper seeks to specify how, according to Plato’s Sophist, true statements achieve their being about objects and their saying that ‘what is about such objects is’. Drawing on the 6th definition of the sophist, I argue for a normative-teleological conception of truth in which the best condition of our soul –in its making statements or having mental states– consists in its seeking to attain the telos of truth. Further, on the basis of Plato’s discussion of original and image, his (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark