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  1. Darwin and Divergence: The Wallace Connection.Barbara G. Beddall - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (1):1-68.
    Wallace's contributions to biological thought tend to be overlooked or overly praised, neither of which produces a satisfactory assessment. Examples of the latter tendency are the recent expositions by Brackman and Brooks; although both books contain much worthwhile material, both are flawed. At critical points their theories fail to measure up, Brackman's because of his misinterpretations of events in the month of June 1858, and Brooks's Darwin's September 5 letter to Gray could, and probably did, represent an ordering of his (...)
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  • Between the Beagle and the Barnacle: Darwin’s Microscopy, 1837–1854.Boris Jardine - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (4):382-395.
    The discovery of a small collection of Darwin manuscripts at the Whipple Museum of the History of Science has allowed a reconsideration of Darwin’s interest in and knowledge of microscopy. Concentrating on the years between his return from the Beagle voyage and the publication of the major taxonomic work on barnacles, this paper recovers a number of important aspects of Darwin’s intellectual and practical development: on returning from the Beagle voyage he acquainted himself with the work of C. G. Ehrenberg, (...)
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  • Further Remarks on Darwin's Spelling Habits and the Dating of Beagle Voyage Manuscripts.Frank J. Sulloway - 1983 - Journal of the History of Biology 16 (3):361 - 390.
  • Further Remarks on Darwin's Spelling Habits and the Dating ofBeagle Voyage Manuscripts.Frank J. Sulloway - 1983 - Journal of the History of Biology 16 (3):361-390.
  • Darwin’s Conversion: The Beagle Voyage and its Aftermath.Frank J. Sulloway - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (3):325-396.
  • John Herschel and Charles Darwin: A Study in Parallel Lives.S. S. Schweber - 1989 - Journal of the History of Biology 22 (1):1 - 71.
  • Herschel, John and Darwin, Charles-a Study in Parallel Lives.Ss Schweber - 1989 - Journal of the History of Biology 22 (1):1-71.
  • Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution: A Review of Our Present Understanding. [REVIEW]David R. Oldroyd - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (2):133-168.
    The paper characterizes Darwin's theory, providing a synthesis of recent historical investigations in this area. Darwin's reading of Malthus led him to appreciate the importance of population pressures, and subsequently of natural selection, with the help of the wedge metaphor. But, in itself, natural selection did not furnish an adequate account of the origin of species, for which a principle of divergence was needed. Initially, Darwin attributed this to geographical isolation, but later, following his work on barnacles which underscored the (...)
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  • Darwin’s Methodological Evolution.James G. Lennox - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):85-99.
    A necessary condition for having a revolution named after you is that you are an innovator in your field. I argue that if Charles Darwin meets this condition, it is as a philosopher and methodologist. In 1991, I made the case for Darwin's innovative use of "thought experiment" in the "Origin." Here I place this innovative practice in the context of Darwin's methodological commitments, trace its origins back into Darwin's notebooks, and pursue Darwin's suggestion that it owes its inspiration to (...)
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  • Charles Darwin as a Prospective Geological Author.Sandra Herbert - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (2):159-192.
    On occasion Charles Darwin can seem our scientific contemporary, for the subjects he engaged remain engaging today, but in his role as author he belongs to the past. It is not customary today for scientists to write book after book, as Darwin did, or for these books to serve as the primary vehicle of scientific communication. For Darwin, however, the book was central. He wrote at least eighteen, depending on what one counts; in his Autobiography he entitled the section describing (...)
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  • Monkeys Into Men and Men Into Monkeys: Chance and Contingency in the Evolution of Man, Mind and Morals in Charles Kingsley’s Water Babies. [REVIEW]Piers J. Hale - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (4):551-597.
    The nineteenth century theologian, author and poet Charles Kingsley was a notable populariser of Darwinian evolution. He championed Darwin’s cause and that of honesty in science for more than a decade from 1859 to 1871. Kingsley’s interpretation of evolution shaped his theology, his politics and his views on race. The relationship between men and apes set the context for Kingsley’s consideration of these issues. Having defended Darwin for a decade in 1871 Kingsley was dismayed to read Darwin’s account of the (...)
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  • Wallace, Darwin, and the Practice of Natural History.Melinda B. Fagan - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (4):601 - 635.
    There is a pervasive contrast in the early natural history writings of the co-discoverers of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin. In his writings from South America and the Malay Archipelago (1848-1852, 1854-1862). Wallace consistently emphasized species and genera, and separated these descriptions from his rarer and briefer discussions of individual organisms. In contrast, Darwin's writings during the Beagle voyage (1831-1836) emphasized individual organisms, and mingled descriptions of individuals and groups. The contrast is explained by the different practices (...)
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  • Erratum To: Charles Darwin’s Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and “The Gradual Birth & Death of Species”. [REVIEW]Paul D. Brinkman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363 - 399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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  • Darwinism.James Lennox - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Darwinism designates a distinctive form of evolutionary explanation for the history and diversity of life on earth. Its original formulation is provided in the first edition of On the Origin of Species in 1859. This entry first formulates ‘Darwin's Darwinism’ in terms of five philosophically distinctive themes: (i) probability and chance, (ii) the nature, power and scope of selection, (iii) adaptation and teleology, (iv) nominalism vs. essentialism about species and (v) the tempo and mode of evolutionary change. Both Darwin and (...)
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