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  1. Operation of a triage committee for advanced life support during the COVID-19 pandemic.Benjamín Herreros, Rafael Ruiz de Luna, Natalia de la Calle, Diego Gayoso, Paula Martínez, Karmele Olaciregui Dague & Gregorio Palacios - 2022 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 17 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundDuring the first weeks of March 2020 in Spain, the cases of severe respiratory failure progressively increased, generating an imbalance between the clinical needs for advanced life support measures and the effective availability of ALS resources. To address this problem, the creation of triage committees was proposed, whose main function is to select the best candidates to receive ALS. The main objective of our study is to describe the clinical characteristics of the patients evaluated by the TC of the Alcorcón (...)
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  • Systemising Triage: COVID-19 Guidelines and Their Underlying Theories of Distributive Justice.Lukas J. Meier - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has been overwhelming public health-care systems around the world. With demand exceeding the availability of medical resources in several regions, hospitals have been forced to invoke triage. To ensure that this difficult task proceeds in a fair and organised manner, governments scrambled experts to draft triage guidelines under enormous time pressure. Although there are similarities between the documents, they vary considerably in how much weight their respective authors place on the different criteria that they propose. Since most (...)
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  • Multidisciplinary Support for Ethics Deliberations During the First COVID Wave.Bénédicte Lombart, Laura Moïsi, Valérie Bellamy, Valérie Landolfini, Marie-Josée Manifacier, Valérie Mesnage, Charlotte Heilbrunn, Dominique Pateron, Alexandra Andro-Melin, Olivier Fain, Nicolas Carbonell, Anne Bourrier, Caroline Thomas, Delphine Libeaut, Christian-Guy Coichard, Alice Polomeni & Bertrand Guidet - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):833-843.
    Background The first COVID-19 wave started in February 2020 in France. The influx of patients requiring emergency care and high-level technicity led healthcare professionals to fear saturation of available care. In that context, the multidisciplinary Ethics- Support Cell was created to help medical teams consider the decisions that could potentially be sources of ethical dilemmas. Objectives The primary objective was to prospectively collect information on requests for EST assistance from 23 March to 9 May 2020. The secondary aim was to (...)
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  • Can a Global Bioethical Lens Engender Color Blindness? An Examination of Public Health Disasters.Michael O. S. Afolabi - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (2):61-64.
    One of the central characteristics of public health disasters is the rapid overlapping of different needs and priorities that require making critical choices that inevitably elicit conflicti...
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  • Should Healthcare Workers Be Prioritised During the COVID-19 Pandemic? A View From Madrid and New York.Diego Real de Asua & Joseph J. Fins - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):397-400.
    While COVID-19 has generated a massive burden of illness worldwide, healthcare workers have been disproportionately exposed to SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection. During the so-called ‘first wave’, infection rates among this population group have ranged between 10% and 20%, raising as high as one in every four COVID-19 patients in Spain at the peak of the crisis. Now that many countries are already dealing with new waves of COVID-19 cases, a potential competition between HCW and non-HCW patients for scarce resources can still (...)
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  • Getting to the Truth: Ethics, Trust, and Triage in the United States Versus Europe During the Covid‐19 Pandemic.Kristina Orfali - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (1):16-22.
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  • The Principle of Salvage in the Context of COVID‐19.Alan J. Kearns - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (1).
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  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Pandemic Priority Decisions and Triage.Hans Flaatten, Vernon Van Heerden, Christian Jung, Michael Beil, Susannah Leaver, Andrew Rhodes, Bertrand Guidet & Dylan W. deLange - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):75-75.
    In this analysis we discuss the change in criteria for triage of patients during three different phases of a pandemic like COVID-19, seen from the critical care point of view. Availability of critical care beds has become a hot topic, and in many countries, we have seen a huge increase in the provision of temporary intensive care bed capacity. However, there is a limit where the hospitals may run out of resources to provide critical care, which is heavily dependent on (...)
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  • COVID-19 Current Controversies.Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (7):419-420.
    This July 2020 issue of JME introduces a new section, “COVID-19 Current Controversies,” which will be a recurring section in each issue for the foreseeable future. This issue reflects on some of the most pressing ethical issues that have arisen roughly 6 months into the pandemic. Kathleen Liddell and colleagues examine important legal considerations at play in ventilator allocation decisions raised by the pandemic.1 They point out that ethics-based triage protocols that argue from the principle of “saving the most lives” (...)
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  • COVID-19 and Justice.John McMillan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):639-640.
    John Rawls begins a Theory of Justice with the observation that 'Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought… Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override'1. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in lock-downs, the restriction of liberties, debate about the right to refuse medical treatment and many other changes to the everyday behaviour of persons. The justice issues it raises are diverse, (...)
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