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  1. Finding categories through words: More nameable features improve category learning.Martin Zettersten & Gary Lupyan - 2020 - Cognition 196 (C):104135.
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  • Does Environmental Experience Shape Spatial Cognition? Frames of Reference Among Ancash Quechua Speakers.A. Shapero Joshua - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (5):1274-1298.
    Previous studies have shown that language contributes to humans' ability to orient using landmarks and shapes their use of frames of reference for memory. However, the role of environmental experience in shaping spatial cognition has not been investigated. This study addresses such a possibility by examining the use of FoRs in a nonverbal spatial memory task among residents of an Andean community in Peru. Participants consisted of 97 individuals from Ancash Quechua-speaking households who spoke Quechua and/or Spanish and varied considerably (...)
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  • Spatial Reasoning in Tenejapan Mayans.Anna Papafragou Peggy Li, Linda Abarbanell, Lila Gleitman - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):33.
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  • Frames of reference in discourse: Spatial descriptions in Bashkir.Tatiana Nikitina - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (3):495-544.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  • Facing the Sunrise: Cultural Worldview Underlying Intrinsic-Based Encoding of Absolute Frames of Reference in Aymara.Rafael E. Núñez & Carlos Cornejo - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (6):965-991.
    The Aymara of the Andes use absolute (cardinal) frames of reference for describing the relative position of ordinary objects. However, rather than encoding them in available absolute lexemes, they do it in lexemes that are intrinsic to the body: nayra (“front”) and qhipa (“back”), denoting east and west, respectively. Why? We use different but complementary ethnographic methods to investigate the nature of this encoding: (a) linguistic expressions and speech–gesture co-production, (b) linguistic patterns in the distinct regional Spanish-based variety Castellano Andino (...)
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  • Language supports young children’s use of spatial relations to remember locations.Hilary E. Miller, Rebecca Patterson & Vanessa R. Simmering - 2016 - Cognition 150 (C):170-180.
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  • Differences in the Visual Perception of Symmetric Patterns in Orangutans and Two Human Cultural Groups: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Katja Liebal, Carla Pritsch & Thomas Jacobsen - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Space in Hand and Mind: Gesture and Spatial Frames of Reference in Bilingual Mexico.Tyler Marghetis, Melanie McComsey & Kensy Cooperrider - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (12):e12920.
    Speakers of many languages prefer allocentric frames of reference (FoRs) when talking about small‐scale space, using words like “east” or “downhill.” Ethnographic work has suggested that this preference is also reflected in how such speakers gesture. Here, we investigate this possibility with a field experiment in Juchitán, Mexico. In Juchitán, a preferentially allocentric language (Isthmus Zapotec) coexists with a preferentially egocentric one (Spanish). Using a novel task, we elicited spontaneous co‐speech gestures about small‐scale motion events (e.g., toppling blocks) in Zapotec‐dominant (...)
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  • How children perceive fractals: Hierarchical self-similarity and cognitive development.Maurício Dias Martins, Sabine Laaha, Eva Maria Freiberger, Soonja Choi & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):10-24.
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  • Spatial reasoning in Tenejapan Mayans.Peggy Li, Linda Abarbanell, Lila Gleitman & Anna Papafragou - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):33-53.
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  • Competing perspectives on frames of reference in language and thought.Peggy Li & Linda Abarbanell - 2018 - Cognition 170 (C):9-24.
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  • Alternative spin on phylogenetically inherited spatial reference frames.Peggy Li & Linda Abarbanell - 2019 - Cognition 191 (C):103983.
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  • The Original Sin of Cognitive Science.Stephen C. Levinson - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (3):396-403.
    Classical cognitive science was launched on the premise that the architecture of human cognition is uniform and universal across the species. This premise is biologically impossible and is being actively undermined by, for example, imaging genomics. Anthropology (including archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistics, and cultural anthropology) is, in contrast, largely concerned with the diversification of human culture, language, and biology across time and space—it belongs fundamentally to the evolutionary sciences. The new cognitive sciences that will emerge from the interactions with the (...)
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  • Tools from evolutionary biology shed new light on the diversification of languages.Stephen C. Levinson & Russell D. Gray - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):167-173.
  • Uphill and Downhill in a Flat World: The Conceptual Topography of the Yupno House.Kensy Cooperrider, James Slotta & Rafael Núñez - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (3):768-799.
    Speakers of many languages around the world rely on body‐based contrasts (e.g., left/right) for spatial communication and cognition. Speakers of Yupno, a language of Papua New Guinea's mountainous interior, rely instead on an environment‐based uphill/downhill contrast. Body‐based contrasts are as easy to use indoors as outdoors, but environment‐based contrasts may not be. Do Yupno speakers still use uphill/downhill contrasts indoors and, if so, how? We report three studies on spatial communication within the Yupno house. Even in this flat world, uphill/downhill (...)
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  • An information-theoretic approach to the typology of spatial demonstratives.Sihan Chen, Richard Futrell & Kyle Mahowald - 2023 - Cognition 240 (C):105505.
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  • What Early Sapiens Cognition Can Teach Us: Untangling Cultural Influences on Human Cognition Across Time.Andrea Bender - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Evidence of cultural influences on cognition is accumulating, but untangling these cultural influences from one another or from non-cultural influences has remained a challenging task. As between-group differences are neither a sufficient nor a necessary indicator of cultural impact, cross-cultural comparisons in isolation are unable to furnish any cogent conclusions. This shortfall can be compensated by taking a diachronic perspective that focuses on the role of culture for the emergence and evolution of our cognitive abilities. Three strategies for reconstructing early (...)
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  • Variability in the Alignment of Number and Space Across Languages and Tasks.Andrea Bender, Annelie Rothe-Wulf & Sieghard Beller - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Mapping spatial frames of reference onto time: A review of theoretical accounts and empirical findings. [REVIEW]Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2014 - Cognition 132 (3):342-382.
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  • Diversity as Asset.Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):677-688.
    We begin our commentary by summarizing the commonalities and differences in cognitive phenomena across cultures, as found by the seven papers of this topic. We then assess the commonalities and differences in how our various authors have approached the study of cognitive diversity, and speculate on the need for, and potential of, cross-disciplinary collaboration.
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  • Being In Front_ Is Good—But Where Is _In Front? Preferences for Spatial Referencing Affect Evaluation.Andrea Bender, Sarah Teige-Mocigemba, Annelie Rothe-Wulf, Miriam Seel & Sieghard Beller - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (6):e12840.
    Speakers of English frequently associate location in space with valence, as in moving up and down the “social ladder.” If such an association also holds for the sagittal axis, an object “in front of” another object would be evaluated more positively than the one “behind.” Yet how people conceptualize relative locations depends on which frame of reference (FoR) they adopt—and hence on cross‐linguistically diverging preferences. What is conceptualized as “in front” in one variant of the relative FoR (e.g., translation) is (...)
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  • Turn around to have a look? Spatial referencing in dorsal vs. frontal settings in cross-linguistic comparison.Sieghard Beller, Henrik Singmann, Lisa Hüther & Andrea Bender - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Beyond Language Shift: Spatial Cognition among the Ixcatecs in Mexico.Evangelia Adamou & Xingjia Rachel Shen - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (1-2):94-115.
    Recently there has been a renewed interest surrounding the role that language plays in the shaping of cognition based on the study of spatial relations with a particular attention to Mesoamerican languages. Since Brown and Levinson, several studies have shown that speakers of Mesoamerican languages largely prefer non-egocentric strategies in the solution of nonverbal tasks and that this preference strongly aligns to the spatial expressions found in these languages. Moreover, it has been argued that contact with Spanish increases the use (...)
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  • Me, Myself and the Other. Melanesian and Western Ideas on Selfhood and Recognition.Anita Caroline Galuschek - unknown
    In my thesis I argue for a philosophical-anthropological approach which enables investigations in empathy and care by opening up a window on the motivation of recognition. I show how biographies as narratives can help to understand the other within her or his own life-world, even if the life-world is the very part of our personality as a dividually conceived relational self. Therewith, personhood can be conceived in a new concept of personhood that is understood as a category of the human (...)
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