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  1. Seeing the Workers for the Trees: Exalted and Devalued Manual Labour in the Pacific Northwest Craft Cider Industry.Anelyse M. Weiler - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (1):65-78.
    Craft food and beverage makers regularly emphasize transparency about the ethical, sustainable sourcing of their ingredients and the human labour underpinning their production, all of which helps elevate the status of their products and occupational communities. Yet, as with other niche ethical consumption markets, craft industries continue to rely on employment conditions for agricultural workers that reproduce inequalities of race, class, and citizenship in the dominant food system. This paper interrogates the contradiction between the exaltation of craft cidermakers’ labour and (...)
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  • Food provisioning strategies among Latinx farm workers in southwestern Idaho.Lisa Meierotto & Rebecca Som Castellano - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (1):209-223.
    Food provisioning refers to the mental, physical and emotional labor involved in providing food for oneself and one’s family. The labor of food provisioning has been found to be made more difficult by a number of factors, including gender, socioeconomic status, age, and geography. However, little research has been done examining the labor of food provisioning among farm workers, a significantly marginalized population in the United States. In order to examine the food provisioning strategies and struggles of farm workers, we (...)
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  • When Farmers Are Pulled in Too Many Directions: Comparing Institutional Drivers of Food Safety and Environmental Sustainability in California Agriculture.Patrick Baur - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (4):1175-1194.
    Aspirations to farm ‘better’ may fall short in practice due to constraints outside of farmers’ control. Yet farmers face proliferating pressures to adopt practices that align with various societal visions of better agriculture. What happens when the accumulation of external pressures overwhelms farm management capacity? Or, worse, when different visions of better agriculture pull farmers toward conflicting management paradigms? This article addresses these questions by comparing the institutional manifestations of two distinct societal obligations placed on California fruit and vegetable farmers: (...)
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  • How wage structure and crop size negatively impact farmworker livelihoods in monocrop organic production: interviews with strawberry harvesters in California.Rachel Soper - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (2):325-336.
    Because organic certification standards institutionalized a product-based rather than process-based definition, certified organic produce can be grown on large-scale industrial monocrop farms. Besides toxicity of inputs, these farms operate in much the same way as conventional production. Scholars emphasize the fact that labor rights have been left out of certification criteria, and because of that, organic farms reproduce the same labor relations as conventional. Empirical studies of organic farm labor, however, rely primarily on the perspective of farmers. In this study, (...)
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  • Innovative Millennial Snails: The Story of Slow Food University of Wisconsin.Lydia Zepeda & Anna Reznickova - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (1):167-178.
    This is the story of Slow Food University of Wisconsin, a student organization that grew from one woman’s idea to a community of over 3200 people dedicated to making sustainable, fairly produced, delicious food accessible in a small city, with a big university, in the heart of the United States. Along the way SFUW has fostered new ideas, developed skills, and built relationships through conscious food procurement, cooking and eating. This essay describes the evolution of the organization and its four (...)
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