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  1. Płeć Kulturowa W Rozproszonych Systemach Poznawczych – Możliwości Konceptualizacji.Wachowski Witold - 2015 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 5 (1):135-150.
    Title - Gender in distributed cognitive systems: Possible conceptualizations. Abstract - There is a mismatch between social and biological approaches in the studies on sex and gender. Neurofeminist researchers critically examine gendered impacts of research in neuroscience and cognitive science, as well as develop more adequate and gender‑appropriate neuroscientific studies. However, they still seem to be focused on the brain and its relationship with the environment. Moreover, there are a little ‘science‑phobic’ feminist approaches based on actor‑network theory, and social science (...)
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  • How Many Epistemologies Should Guide the Production of Scientific Knowledge?: A Response to Maffie, Mendieta, and Wylie.Sandra Harding - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 212-219.
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  • Cultivating Trust, Producing Knowledge: The Management of Archaeological Labour and the Making of a Discipline.Allison Mickel & Nylah Byrd - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):3-28.
    Like any science, archaeology relies on trust between actors involved in the production of knowledge. In the early history of archaeology, this epistemic trust was complicated by histories of Orientalism in the Middle East and colonialism more broadly. The racial and power dynamics underpinning 19th- and early 20th-century archaeology precluded the possibility of interpersonal moral trust between foreign archaeologists and locally hired labourers. In light of this, archaeologists created systems of reward, punishment, and surveillance to ensure the honest behaviour of (...)
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  • Turning Around the Question of 'Transfer' in Education: Tracing the Sociomaterial.Monica Dianne Mulcahy - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (12):1276-1289.
    In this article I reconsider the issue of ?transfer? in education. Received views of learning transfer tend to rely upon a version of representation in which the world and the learner are held apart. The focus falls on how this gap can be closed; how learning can be transferred. A sociomaterial perspective, by contrast, puts learner and world back together, making each available to the other. Bringing the materialist sensibility of actor-network theory to bear and drawing on empirical data collected (...)
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  • From 'Implications' to 'Dimensions': Science, Medicine and Ethics in Society. [REVIEW]Martyn D. Pickersgill - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (1):31-42.
    Much bioethical scholarship is concerned with the social, legal and philosophical implications of new and emerging science and medicine, as well as with the processes of research that under-gird these innovations. Science and technology studies (STS), and the related and interpenetrating disciplines of anthropology and sociology, have also explored what novel technoscience might imply for society, and how the social is constitutive of scientific knowledge and technological artefacts. More recently, social scientists have interrogated the emergence of ethical issues: they have (...)
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  • The Emergence of Transcendental Norms in Human Systems.Mark Graves - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):501-532.
    Terrence Deacon has described three orders of emergence; Arthur Peacocke and others have suggested four levels of human systems and sciences; and Philip Clayton has postulated an additional, transcendent, level. Orders and levels describe distinct aspects of emergence, with orders characterizing topological complexity and levels characterizing theoretical knowledge and causal power. By using Deacon's orders to analyze and relate each of the four "lower" levels one can project that analysis on the transcendent level to gain insight into the teleodynamic emergence (...)
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  • Not the Only Game in Town.Werner Callebaut - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (2):107-111.
  • From Science Studies to Scientific Literacy: A View From the Classroom.Douglas Allchin - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (9):1911-1932.
  • Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste: A Long-Term Socio-Technical Experiment.Jantine Schröder - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):687-705.
    In this article we investigate whether long-term radioactive waste management by means of geological disposal can be understood as a social experiment. Geological disposal is a rather particular technology in the way it deals with the analytical and ethical complexities implied by the idea of technological innovation as social experimentation, because it is presented as a technology that ultimately functions without human involvement. We argue that, even when the long term function of the ‘social’ is foreseen to be restricted to (...)
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  • Editorial Overview: Public Science and Technology Scholars: Engaging Whom?Erik Fisher - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):607-620.
    Science policy mandates across the industrialized world insinuate more active roles for publics, their earlier participation in policy decisions, and expanded notions of science and technology governance. In response to these policies, engaged scholars in science studies have sought to design and conduct exercises aimed at better attuning science to its public contexts. As demand increases for innovative and potentially democratic forms of public engagement with science and technology, so also do the prospects for insights from science studies to contribute (...)
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  • On Technological Determinism: A Typology, Scope Conditions, and a Mechanism.Allan Dafoe - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (6):1047-1076.
    “Technological determinism” is predominantly employed as a critic’s term, used to dismiss certain classes of theoretical and empirical claims. Understood more productively as referring to claims that place a greater emphasis on the autonomous and social-shaping tendencies of technology, technological determinism is a valuable and prominent perspective. This article will advance our understanding of technological determinism through four contributions. First, I clarify some debates about technological determinism through an examination of the meaning of technology. Second, I parse the family of (...)
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  • Representing Representation. [REVIEW]Götz Hoeppe - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (6):1077-1092.
    This review essay of two edited volumes sketches how STS scholars have analyzed scientific representation and visualization in recent work. Several key foci have emerged, among them attending closely to materiality, engaging the digital through embodied action, turning to ontology, as well as benefitting from artistic practice and critique. In diverse ways these choices are informed by a discontentment with the Cartesian split of mind and body as well as the picture theory of language. Yet, naturalism endures as a template, (...)
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  • Rawls’s Wide Reflective Equilibrium as a Method for Engaged Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Potentials and Limitations for the Context of Technological Risks.Behnam Taebi & Neelke Doorn - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (3):487-517.
    The introduction of new technologies in society is sometimes met with public resistance. Supported by public policy calls for “upstream engagement” and “responsible innovation,” recent years have seen a notable rise in attempts to attune research and innovation processes to societal needs, so that stakeholders’ concerns are taken into account in the design phase of technology. Both within the social sciences and in the ethics of technology, we see many interdisciplinary collaborations being initiated that aim to address tensions between various (...)
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  • Give Me an Experiment and I Will Raise a Laboratory.Matthias Gross - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (4):613-634.
    Bruno Latour once argued that science laboratories actively modify the wider society by displacing crucial actors outside the laboratory into the “field.” This article turns this idea on its head by using the case of geothermal energy utilization to demonstrate that in many cases it is the experimental setup outside the laboratory that is there first, with the activities normally associated with a laboratory setting only being decided upon and implemented post hoc. As soon as the actors involved perceive unknowns (...)
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  • Resisting Power, Retooling Justice: Promises of Feminist Postcolonial Technosciences.Banu Subramaniam & Anne Pollock - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (6):951-966.
    This special issue explores intersections of feminism, postcolonialism, and technoscience. The papers emerged out of a 2014 research seminar on Feminist Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan. Through innovative engagement with rich empirical cases and theoretical trends in postcolonial theory, feminist theory, and STS, the papers trace local and global circulations of technoscience. They illuminate ways in which science and technology are imbricated in circuits of state power and global (...)
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  • Sunlight in Cyberspace? On Transparency as a Form of Ordering.Mikkel Flyverbom - 2015 - European Journal of Social Theory 18 (2):168-184.
    While we witness a growing belief in transparency as an ideal solution to a wide range of societal problems, we know less about the practical workings of transparency as it guides conduct in organizational and regulatory settings. This article argues that transparency efforts involve much more than the provision of information and other forms of ‘sunlight’, and are rather a matter of managing visibilities than providing insight and clarity. Building on actor-network theory and Foucauldian governmentality studies, it calls for careful (...)
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  • Medicine, Technology, and Religion Reconsidered: The Case of Brain Death Definition in Israel.Hagai Boas, Shai Lavi & Sky Edith Gross - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (2):186-208.
    The introduction of respiratory machines in the 1950s may have saved the lives of many, but it also challenged the notion of death itself. This development endowed “machines” with the power to form a unique ontological creature: a live body with a “dead” brain. While technology may be blamed for complicating things in the first place, it is also called on to solve the resulting quandaries. Indeed, it is not the birth of the “brain-dead” that concerns us most, but rather (...)
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  • Governing Uncertainty or Uncertain Governance? Information Security and the Challenge of Cutting Ties.Rebecca Slayton - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):81-111.
    Information security governance has become an elusive goal and a murky concept. This paper problematizes both information security governance and the broader concept of governance. What does it mean to govern information security, or for that matter, anything? Why have information technologies proven difficult to govern? And what assurances can governance provide for the billions of people who rely on information technologies every day? Drawing together several distinct bodies of literature—including multiple strands of governance theory, actor–network theory, and scholarship on (...)
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  • Is Technology Value-Neutral?Boaz Miller - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):53-80.
    According to the Value-Neutrality Thesis, technology is morally and politically neutral, neither good nor bad. A knife may be put to bad use to murder an innocent person or to good use to peel an apple for a starving person, but the knife itself is a mere instrument, not a proper subject for moral or political evaluation. While contemporary philosophers of technology widely reject the VNT, it remains unclear whether claims about values in technology are just a figure of speech (...)
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  • Tracking and Targeting: Sociotechnologies of (In)Security.Jutta Weber, Karolina Follis & Lucy Suchman - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (6):983-1002.
    This introduction to the special issue of the same title sets out the context for a critical examination of contemporary developments in sociotechnical systems deployed in the name of security. Our focus is on technologies of tracking, with their claims to enable the identification of those who comprise legitimate targets for the use of violent force. Taking these claims as deeply problematic, we join a growing body of scholarship on the technopolitical logics that underpin an increasingly violent landscape of institutions, (...)
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  • Science and Technology Studies in Policy: The UK Synthetic Biology Roadmap.Jane Calvert & Claire Marris - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (1):34-61.
    In this paper, we reflect on our experience as science and technology studies researchers who were members of the working group that produced A Synthetic Biology Roadmap for the UK in 2012. We explore how this initiative sought to govern an uncertain future and describe how it was successfully used to mobilize public funds for synthetic biology from the UK government. We discuss our attempts to incorporate the insights and sensibilities of STS into the policy process and why we chose (...)
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  • Adopting Neuroscience: Parenting and Affective Indeterminacy.Celia Roberts & Adrian Mackenzie - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (3):130-155.
    What happens when neuroscientific knowledges move from laboratories and clinics into therapeutic settings concerned with the care of children? ‘Brain-based parenting’ is a set of discourses and practices emerging at the confluence of attachment theory, neuroscience, psychotherapy and social work. The neuroscientific knowledges involved understand affective states such as fear, anger and intimacy as dynamic patterns of coordination between brain localities, as well as flows of biochemical signals via hormones such as cortisol. Drawing on our own attempts to adopt brain-based (...)
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  • Is Technology an Autonomous Process? Technology, Scientific Experiment, and Human Person.Marco Buzzoni - 2020 - Axiomathes 30 (6):629-648.
    Despite the many turns that philosophy of technology has undergone in recent decades, the question of the nature and limits of technological determinism has been neglected, because it was considered as solved and overcome, and therefore not worth further discussion. This paper once again raises the problem of TD, by trying to save the opposing, but complementary elements of truth of the two main forms of TD that I shall call “nomological” and “normative”: technology is all-pervasive and has an inexorable (...)
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  • Making Quantitative Research Work: From Positivist Dogma to Actual Social Scientific Inquiry.Michael J. Zyphur & Dean C. Pierides - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (1):49-62.
    Researchers misunderstand their role in creating ethical problems when they allow dogmas to purportedly divorce scientists and scientific practices from the values that they embody. Cortina, Edwards, and Powell help us clarify and further develop our position by responding to our critique of, and alternatives to, this misleading separation. In this rebuttal, we explore how the desire to achieve the separation of facts and values is unscientific on the very terms endorsed by its advocates—this separation is refuted by empirical observation. (...)
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  • Objectivity and a Comparison of Methodological Scenario Approaches for Climate Change Research.Elisabeth A. Lloyd & Vanessa J. Schweizer - 2014 - Synthese 191 (10):2049-2088.
    Climate change assessments rely upon scenarios of socioeconomic developments to conceptualize alternative outcomes for global greenhouse gas emissions. These are used in conjunction with climate models to make projections of future climate. Specifically, the estimations of greenhouse gas emissions based on socioeconomic scenarios constrain climate models in their outcomes of temperatures, precipitation, etc. Traditionally, the fundamental logic of the socioeconomic scenarios—that is, the logic that makes them plausible—is developed and prioritized using methods that are very subjective. This introduces a fundamental (...)
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  • Negotiating Plausibility: Intervening in the Future of Nanotechnology.Cynthia Selin - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):723-737.
    The national-level scenarios project NanoFutures focuses on the social, political, economic, and ethical implications of nanotechnology, and is initiated by the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University (CNS-ASU). The project involves novel methods for the development of plausible visions of nanotechnology-enabled futures, elucidates public preferences for various alternatives, and, using such preferences, helps refine future visions for research and outreach. In doing so, the NanoFutures project aims to address a central question: how to deliberate the social implications (...)
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  • Introduction: The Coming of the Knowledge Society and the Challenges for the Future of Europe. [REVIEW]Francesco Coniglione - 2009 - Axiomathes 19 (4):353-372.
    This paper explicates the philosophical and epistemological background of the MIRRORS project, which is the starting point of the various contributions in this issue. Developments in the philosophy of science will be discussed, especially the watershed work of Kuhn, in order to analyze further developments in the sociology of science, particularly starting from the Strong Programme. Finally, it will be shown how a multidisciplinary approach in Science & Technology (S&T) studies, as opposed to an interdisciplinary one, is to be preferred. (...)
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  • How Many Epistemologies Should Guide the Production of Scientific Knowledge? A Response to Maffie, Mendieta, and Wylie.Sandra Harding - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):212-219.
  • Fixing Technology with Society: The Coproduction of Democratic Deficits and Responsible Innovation at the OECD and the European Commission.Sebastian Pfotenhauer, Tess Doezema & Nina Frahm - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (1):174-216.
    Long presented as a universal policy-recipe for social prosperity and economic growth, the promise of innovation seems to be increasingly in question, giving way to a new vision of progress in which society is advanced as a central enabler of technoeconomic development. Frameworks such as “Responsible” or “Mission-oriented” Innovation, for example, have become commonplace parlance and practice in the governance of the innovation–society nexus. In this paper, we study the dynamics by which this “social fix” to technoscience has gained legitimacy (...)
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  • “Once Upon a Time” Philosophy of Science: STS, Science Policy and the Semantic View of Scientific Theories. [REVIEW]Enrico Viola - 2009 - Axiomathes 19 (4):465-480.
    Is a policy-friendly philosophy of science possible? In order to respond this question, I consider a particular instance of contemporary philosophy of science, the semantic view of scientific theories, by placing it in the broader methodological landscape of the integration of philosophy of science into STS (Science and Technology Studies) as a component of the overall contribution of the latter to science policy. In that context, I defend a multi-disciplinary methodological integration of the special discipline composing STS against a reductionist (...)
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  • Disciplinary Networks and Bounding: Scientific Communication Between Science and Technology Studies and the History of Science. [REVIEW]Frédéric Vandermoere & Raf Vanderstraeten - 2012 - Minerva 50 (4):451-470.
    This article examines the communication networks within and between science and technology studies (STS) and the history of science. In particular, journal relatedness data are used to analyze some of the structural features of their disciplinary identities and relationships. The results first show that, although the history of science is more than half a century older than STS, the size of the STS network is more than twice that of the history of science network. Further, while a majority of the (...)
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  • Situational Analysis as a Framework for Interdisciplinary Research in the Social Sciences.Jan Kalenda - 2016 - Human Affairs 26 (3):340-355.
    This study presents situational analysis as a suitable framework for the development of qualitatively-oriented interdisciplinary research in the social sciences. The article argues that even though interdisciplinary research is considered a coveted form of research practice, it is not particularly well developed in the social sciences. This is partly due to institutional barriers, but also because the majority of disciplines lack a suitable theoretical and methodological framework capable of unifying a variety of theoretical bases and primarily methodological processes. Situational analysis, (...)
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  • The Science Policy Script, Revised.Alexandra Hofmänner & Elisio Macamo - 2021 - Minerva 59 (3):331-354.
    The paper considers the notion of Science Policy from a postcolonial perspective. It examines the theoretical implications of the recent trend to include emerging and developing countries in international Science Policies by way of the case study of Switzerland. This country’s new international science policy instruments and measures have challenged the classical distinction between international scientific cooperation and development cooperation, with consequences on standards and evaluation criteria. The analysis reveals that the underlying assumptions of the concept of Science Policy perpetuate (...)
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  • Machine Learning in Tutorials – Universal Applicability, Underinformed Application, and Other Misconceptions.Andreas Breiter, Juliane Jarke & Hendrik Heuer - 2021 - Big Data and Society 8 (1).
    Machine learning has become a key component of contemporary information systems. Unlike prior information systems explicitly programmed in formal languages, ML systems infer rules from data. This paper shows what this difference means for the critical analysis of socio-technical systems based on machine learning. To provide a foundation for future critical analysis of machine learning-based systems, we engage with how the term is framed and constructed in self-education resources. For this, we analyze machine learning tutorials, an important information source for (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences.Yuanlin Guo - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (9):1835-1844.
  • Where the Pasts and Futures of Science and Technology Studies Meet: U. Felt, R. Fouché, C. A. Miller and L. Smith-Doerr The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies, Fourth Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1208pp, US$ 75 HB.Gábor Bíró - 2018 - Metascience 27 (1):169-172.
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  • The Rise and Demise of the International Council for Science Policy Studies (ICSPS) as a Cold War Bridging Organization.Aant Elzinga - 2012 - Minerva 50 (3):277-305.
    When the journal Minerva was founded in 1962, science and higher educational issues were high on the agenda, lending impetus to the interdisciplinary field of “Science Studies” qua “Science Policy Studies.” As government expenditures for promoting various branches of science increased dramatically on both sides of the East-West Cold War divide, some common issues regarding research management also emerged and with it an interest in closer academic interaction in the areas of history and policy of science. Through a close reading (...)
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  • Gendered Boundary-Work Within the Finnish Skepticism Movement.Marjo Kolehmainen & Pia Vuolanto - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (4):789-814.
    As a worldwide social movement, skepticism aims to promote science and critical thinking. However, by analyzing texts published in the magazine of the Finnish skepticism movement between 1988 and 2017, we find that the movement carries out its mission in a way that maintains and produces gendered hierarchies. We identify six forms of gendered boundary-work in the data: science as masculine, questioning women, complementary and alternative medicine as feminine, debating the status of gender studies, gender within the skepticism movement, and (...)
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  • Justice in the Distribution of Knowledge.Faik Kurtulmus & Gürol Irzik - 2017 - Episteme 14 (2):129-146.
    In this article we develop an account of justice in the distribution of knowledge. We first argue that knowledge is a fundamental interest that grounds claims of justice due to its role in individuals’ deliberations about the common good, their personal good and the pursuit thereof. Second, we identify the epistemic basic structure of a society, namely, the institutions that determine individuals’ opportunities for acquiring knowledge and discuss what justice requires of them. Our main contention is that a systematic lack (...)
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  • Beyond the Triple Helix: Framing STS in the Developmental Context.Yanuar Nugroho & Sulfikar Amir - 2013 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 33 (3-4):115-126.
    For the past three decades or so, the field of Science and Technology Studies has shed light on the interrelationship between modern science and technology, on one side, and contemporary society, on the other. A majority of this knowledge and insights are situated in the context of Western societies, or more precisely, in economically and technologically advanced societies in Western Europe and North America. However, STS has much to offer to the discourse of science and technology in the Global South, (...)
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  • Narratives of Menstrual Product Consumption: Convenience, Culture, or Commoditization?Anna Davidson - 2012 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 32 (1):56-70.
    The environmental and social costs of consumer societies have increasingly been recognized. Achieving sustainable household consumption requires an understanding of the underlying roots of current consumption levels. Using the case study of menstrual care practices, different theoretical frameworks—or narratives—for understanding household consumption are evaluated. The author argues that theories of consumption that focus on individual choice based on assessments of convenience or cleanliness, or only on cultural imperatives need to be expanded to take account of the wider political–economic context. Using (...)
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  • Science, Technology, & Human Values at 40.Edward J. Hackett - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (5):439-442.
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  • Outreaching, Outsourcing, and Disembedding: How Offshore Wind Scientists Consider Their Engagement with Society.Sara Heidenreich - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (3):464-486.
    The role of the individual scientist as a socialization agent is increasingly emphasized in science policy. This article analyzes offshore wind scientists’ narratives about science–technology–society relations and their role in them. It particularly focuses on the nuanced and detailed reasons that scientists give for their level of engagement with society. The analysis is based on semistructured individual and focus group interviews with thirty-five scientists. It finds a diversity of narratives related to the questions of whether socialization of technology is needed (...)
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  • Making Nano Matter: An Inquiry Into the Discourses of Governable Science.Elena Simakova - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (6):604-626.
    The article examines science-policy conversations mediated by social science in attempts to govern, or set up terms for, scientific research. The production of social science research accounts about science faces challenges in the domains of emerging technosciences, such as nano. Constructing notions of success and failure, participants in science actively engage in the interpretation of policy notions, such as the societal relevance of their research. Industrial engagement is one of the prominent themes both in policy renditions of governable science, and (...)
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  • Is an FBI Agent a DIY Biologist Like Any Other? A Cultural Analysis of a Biosecurity Risk.Sara Angeli Aguiton & Sara Tocchetti - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (5):825-853.
    Biotechnology's promises has been widely recognized as a major enterprise accelerating the commodification of the biological. After the 9/11 events and the subsequent anthrax letters, biotechnologies have additionally been described as contributing to the construction of biosecurity risks. This paper proposes to investigate the collaboration between the FBI and the DIYbio network as a case study illustrating the productive entanglement of biological risks and promises. To do so, the paper explores the social construction of risks and promises associated with the (...)
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  • Perceptions of STS Topics Among Uruguayan College Students: Implications for Secondary School Curricular Reform.Marcos Sarasola, Rosina Pérez Aguirre & Wilson J. González-Espada - 2017 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 37 (1):15-22.
    The purpose of this descriptive and exploratory study was to measure the perceptions regarding a variety of science, technology, and society topics among a sample of Uruguay underclassmen college students. These perceptions were compared with the viewpoints of a group of professional scientists. It was found that, for some STS topics, such as the role of humans in global climate change, the perceptions of Uruguay underclassmen and scientists were statistically identical. For topics, such as the problem of human overpopulation, both (...)
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  • Argumentative Patterns for Justifying Scientific Explanations.Jean Wagemans - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (1):97-108.
    The practice of justifying scientific explanations generates argumentative patterns in which several types of arguments may play a role. This paper is aimed at identifying these patterns on the basis of an exploration of the institutional conventions regarding the nature, the shape and the quality of scientific explanations as reflected in the writings of influential philosophers of science. First, a basic pattern for justifying scientific explanations is described. Then, two types of extensions of this pattern are presented. These extensions are (...)
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  • Collingridge’s Dilemma and Technoscience.Wolfgang Liebert & Jan C. Schmidt - 2010 - Poiesis and Praxis 7 (1-2):55-71.
    Collingridge’s dilemma is one of the most well-established paradigms presenting a challenge to Technology Assessment (TA). This paper aims to reconstruct the dilemma from an analytic perspective and explicates three assumptions underlying the dilemma: the temporal, knowledge and power/actor assumptions. In the light of the recent transformation of the science, technology and innovation system—in the age of technoscience —these underlying assumptions are called into question. The same result is obtained from a normative angle by Collingridge himself; he criticises the dilemma (...)
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  • From the Bench to the Bedside in the Big Data Age: Ethics and Practices of Consent and Privacy for Clinical Genomics and Personalized Medicine.Peter A. Chow-White, Maggie MacAulay, Anita Charters & Paulina Chow - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):189-200.
    Scientists and clinicians are starting to translate genomic discoveries from research labs to the clinical setting. In the process, big data genomic technologies are both a risk to individual privacy and a benefit to personalized medicine. There is an opportunity to address the social and ethical demands of various stakeholders and shape the adoption of diagnostic genome technologies. We discuss ethical and practical issues associated with the networking of genomics by comparing how the European Union and North America understand and (...)
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